/ MTB tool kit

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Bimble on 17 Feb 2013
I'm after a decent workshop tool kit that doesn't cost the earth, if anyone can recommend one? I've managed to knacker my steed after thrashing it around the MBR at Coed Y Brenin this weekend and have finally had enough of paying the bloke at the shop to fix it for me.
James Dunn - on 18 Feb 2013
In reply to TryfAndy: not Park Tools obviously and not as good in terms of feel or durability but I've got this set and have been pleased with it. It does all the jobs I would want to do and the toolbox is nice to keep it all tidy and in one place. And I thought it was a good deal at £50!

http://www.chainreactioncycles.com/Models.aspx?ModelID=40997
Martin W on 18 Feb 2013
In reply to TryfAndy: Edinburgh Bicycle Co-op also do a couple of reasonably-priced tool kits:
http://www.edinburghbicycle.com/products/revolution-tune-up-tool-kit
http://www.edinburghbicycle.com/products/revolution-tune-up-advanced-tool-kit

They also do a good work stand, which makes working on your bike vastly easier:
http://www.edinburghbicycle.com/products/revolution-tune-up-workstand
(although I see they also list a Park Tools work stand at only £10 more!)

Over the years I've slowly acquired just about everything that's included in those tool kits, probably at vastly greater total cost!
AlisonSmiles - on 18 Feb 2013
In reply to TryfAndy:

I reckon it's one of those things where you accumulate over time or identify carefully what you need. I have a Drapers many years old. 25% used regularly, 25% occasionally, other bits rarely and some in honesty absolutely never.
Frank4short - on 18 Feb 2013
In reply to TryfAndy: Tools are one of those areas where buying cheap will usually cost you double in the long run. As cheaper tools are both not as good, usually made from softer steels, they'll also damage nuts and bolts on your bike if you're in anyway ham fisted.
Bimble on 19 Feb 2013
In reply to James Dunn:

Ta, that looks spot on :)
I'm considering doing a full DIY build soon too (On-One Inbred I think) and having a decent base set will be most useful. I've never been much use at mechanical stuff, so when I do manage to fix something like my brakes or drivetrain, I get so much satisfaction from it.
MHutch - on 19 Feb 2013
In reply to TryfAndy:

Tool kits will have some bits you will either never use or never be brave or stupid enough to try to use. I tend to just buy the tool I need for the job - haven't got the total up to toolkit prices yet.

What have you trashed?
Bimble on 19 Feb 2013
In reply to MHutch:

The rear axle has started to disintegrate and make some less than attractive noises and the bottom bracket sounds like it's full of gravel and wobbles all over the place. That and the fact that I need to do a full strip and overhaul anyway, with complete degrease, deep clean and re-lube, plus cable changes etc.
MHutch - on 20 Feb 2013
In reply to TryfAndy:

You might be better off just buying a few bits of better quality - just the right BB tool and cone spanners for the hub (if it's a shimano), plus a chain whip/cassette removal tool and a chainring bolt tool to get your bits off for degreasing.

The x-tools cheap kit doesn't look like it has the chainring bolt tool. Can't see a cable cutter either, which would be a must if you're swapping out cables. Or a spoke key.

If your hub is cheapy cup and cone, it could well be replacement time from what you describe.
Bimble on 20 Feb 2013
In reply to MHutch:

The x-tools kit has the chainring bolt tool in there, and I've already got a spoke key (somewhere in the garage). The cable tool will be something I'll need to buy extra, but I doubt I could get all of that for the same price if buying it separately.

It's a Shimano hub, but not a particularly top-spec one, and I've got a feeling the seal worked its way loose during the thrashing and is now likely to be full of gunk (which then got ridden into the bearings etc.) Will get it stripped when I can and check the damage.
MHutch - on 20 Feb 2013
In reply to TryfAndy:

Duh- didn't spot it the chainring tool. Also missed that it does have a spoke key...

It's not a bad price for all that, and I guess you'll end up using most of it now and again.

Alun - on 20 Feb 2013
In reply to TryfAndy:

Well done for taking it on yourself!

I agree with MHutch though. Full toolkits invariably have loads of stuff that you don't need - technologies advance quickly (e.g. the tool to extract a modern outboard bearing BB is very different to that required for older models such as octalink, ISIS or square-taper - all of which are different).

> The rear axle has started to disintegrate and make some less than attractive noises

For that you just need some cone-spanners and maybe a handy adjustable spanner. And patience.

> bottom bracket sounds like it's full of gravel and wobbles all over the place

That means a new BB bracket (modern internal BBs are cartridge-based, so not servicable) and a tool to remove/fit- check your new one is of the same type as the old one otherwise your cranks won't fit.

> hat and the fact that I need to do a full strip and overhaul anyway, with complete degrease, deep clean and re-lube, plus cable changes etc.

If your bike was made at any point in the last 15 years then all you really need for this is a decent set of allen keys, maybe a spanner or two. If you really want to a super deep clean then maybe a chain whip, cassette tool, and chain-tool (depending on chain type), but with some good degreaser, decent brushes, and a chain cleaner, this might not be necessary.

The Park Tools website has a loads of great info on taking your bike apart and putting it back together again. Good luck!
Phil79 - on 20 Feb 2013
In reply to TryfAndy:

http://www.on-one.co.uk/i/q/TOJWTK/jobsworth_tool_kit

Full kit for less than £30, bargain. If I dont already own most of the tools I'd buy one.
Bimble on 20 Feb 2013
In reply to Alun:

Thanks mate :) As I said before, I'm a bit of a muppet when it comes to fixing stuff, but have always wanted to be able to, and I get such a great feeling of satisfaction when I do. I changed the disc pads on it a couple of weeks ago and grinned for a whole day afterwards lol
The BB is a splined one, not a hollow jobby, so will check how to get it out.


And nice one, Phil79, that looks top notch, I'll be getting that one. May have to stick the Inbred frame on the order while I'm at it, give meself something to aim at and learn towards.
Phil79 - on 20 Feb 2013
In reply to TryfAndy:

TBH fixing bikes is all fairly straight forward, there's very little thatís complicated about them (compared to cars say) as you can generally see all the parts involved and what they do. Plus thereís lots of free info out there, the Park Tools and Sheldon Brown websites being particularly good.

Once you've got a handful of specialist tools and good basic tool kit you can do most things with a bit of patience and thought. There are obviously some areas that require considerably more skill (wheel building and servicing shocks etc) and worth just getting the LBS to do it.

Incidentally, I was thinking of building an inbred myself, lovely looking bit of steel & the frame only is very keenly priced ATM.
Bimble on 20 Feb 2013
In reply to Phil79:

I think it was trying to fix my car myself (and failing badly) that scared me a bit when it comes to fixing myself. I'm starting to get the hang of it all now though, including the importance of working methodically.

I've got my current Marin Northside Trail hardtail, which does the job most of the time, but is a little small for me and a bit unresponsive on occasion. I'm going to stick with it and keep it going whilst building the Inbred up as a long-term project bike, buying little bits here & there when I can. It should keep me amused, and at £140 for the frame (white, sucker for cleaning punishment), I can't complain.
ads.ukclimbing.com
Horse on 20 Feb 2013
In reply to TryfAndy:
> (In reply to Phil79)
>
> I'm starting to get the hang of it all now though, including the importance of working methodically.
>
That is important. It is helpful to think the task through in advance, I do this, then that, then the other and I will need this tool then that one etc and then have them all to hand; it is a real pain trying to hold something while scrabbling around in the tool box for correct sized tool. Take your time and check things at each stage.

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