/ NEWS: Major Rock Chipping on Peak Gritstone

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UKC News - on 18 Feb 2013
Close up of the damage to the popular preoblem of Razor Roof, 3 kbThe popular gritstone venues of Cratcliffe and Robin Hood's Stride have been badly damaged by a mystery rock chipper.

The chips on the rock are widespread and specifically on known and popular rock climbs and boulder problems. The nature of the chips is such that this is not a case of hold improvement, but just damage to the climbs. All of the affected areas of rock were probably chalk-covered...

Read more at http://www.ukclimbing.com/news/item.php?id=67831

JimboWizbo - on 18 Feb 2013
In reply to UKC News:
Sounds like somebody has a chip on their shoulder.
geordiepie - on 18 Feb 2013
In reply to UKC News:

This person clearly has very low intelligence
mad1693 - on 18 Feb 2013
In reply to UKC News:

Well thats just sad.....what a shame :(
GrahamD - on 18 Feb 2013
In reply to UKC News:

Sounds like somene took a very strong objection to seeing the countryside plastered white in chalk.
dale1968 - on 18 Feb 2013
In reply to GrahamD: obviously not defending such actions, but from the phots it looked very unsightly
THardSevere on 18 Feb 2013
In reply to UKC News:

Even if the person who did it did surface or was caught is there anything legally that any one could do? I can't imagine anyone spending a night in the cells for chipping a piece of rock.
SteveSBlake - on 18 Feb 2013
In reply to THardSevere:

It is unlikely to come to it, but were the perpetrator known, and the owner of the land complained then I suspect the offence 'criminal damage' could be applied.

Steve
Dave Garnett - on 18 Feb 2013
In reply to GrahamD:
> (In reply to UKC News)
>
> Sounds like somene took a very strong objection to seeing the countryside plastered white in chalk.

I'd have had more sympathy if they'd been caught with a bucket of water and soft brush. To respond like this strikes me as positively unbalanced.
Quiddity - on 18 Feb 2013
In reply to GrahamD:
> (In reply to UKC News)
>
> Sounds like somene took a very strong objection to seeing the countryside plastered white in chalk.

And do you think this is a proportionate response?
Ramblin dave - on 18 Feb 2013
In reply to GrahamD:
Is there any evidence that this causes significant friction with locals or other outdoor groups? Are hillwalking forums full of people bemoaning how their enjoyment of a nice walk in the peak was spoilt by seeing masses of chalk on some boulders? Are the local papers full of slightly unhinged letters about how chalk marks left on gritstone are one of the greatest evils facing modern society? Or is it just something that climbers like to beat each other up over that no-one else cares about?

That's a genuine, non-rhetorical question, btw - I'd be interested to know the answer.
GrahamD - on 18 Feb 2013
In reply to Quiddity:

>
> And do you think this is a proportionate response?

Of course not. But its the only reason I can think of targeting chalked holds specifically.

GrahamD - on 18 Feb 2013
In reply to Ramblin dave:

> Is there any evidence that this causes significant friction with locals or other outdoor groups?

I don't know how widespread it is TBH, but something caused significant friction with someone !
mctrials23 - on 18 Feb 2013
In reply to GrahamD:

If you want to piss off climbers you wouldn't chip all the bits that were not used in a climb. The fact they only targeted the chalked holds tells us nothing apart from the fact they wanted to ruin/damage the climbs. Their motives for it cannot be gleaned from their target.
GrahamD - on 18 Feb 2013
In reply to mctrials23:

The fact that they wanted to ruin or damage climbs isn't apparent either. You don't know whether the perpetrator is even aware they were climbs at all, only that the rock had been covered in chalk.
Offwidth - on 18 Feb 2013
In reply to UKC News:

The main earlier discussion on this matter:

http://www.ukclimbing.com/forums/t.php?t=536650
buddha1369 - on 19 Feb 2013
A really sad day indeed!
Christheclimber - on 19 Feb 2013
In reply to UKC News:

This is unbelievable what is happening to bouldering/climbing that attracts such idiots?

I visited Burbage South Boulders on Sunday and thought that either there has been some chipping or more probably some very vigourouus brushing of holds.
DAVETHOMAS90 - on 19 Feb 2013
In reply to UKC News:

This is all such a shame, and we've been here before - "Sweet Thing" etc - and it's easy to think this has something to do with climbing.

I've known geology students get excited about strange deposits on the surface of the rock, which may suggest a different motive worth exploring here. Were any of the holds particularly hard to reach? Could they have been chipped off for testing in the lab? Any geology/earth sciences tutors out there who've been approached by students with "strange rock samples"? Some time ago, some students were seen chopping off bits of Vesicular basalt at Raven Tor. Even so, it still seems remarkably violent, but maybe more understandable than we assume.

As an aside, I also remember the outcry over chipping on the Clifftop boulders, which was actually wear and tear from climbing. The grit here is much softer than that at Stanage, Burbage etc. Worth remembering that we're all culpable of course.

Dave T.
Offwidth - on 19 Feb 2013
In reply to DAVETHOMAS90:

There are clear hammer marks and mostly on chalked rock and in at least ten different locations around the area. This is a nutter with a grudge, plain mean, or whatever.

You're right to point out climbers damage the rock, especially though climbing damp rock with dirty feet. The best example of this I know is the old cut steps on the Cork Stone at Stanton Moor the big bottom step is ground down to vertical now through wear from tourists scrabbling in muddy shoes.
Tony Simpson - on 19 Feb 2013
In reply to DAVETHOMAS90:

You've hit the nail on the head there. Not saying the damage at CC & RHS is not outrageous but have you seen what we climbers / boulders have done to these places. I visited Rowtor a place I use o go lots when I lived in Matlock and the venue was not such an in place back then, and had not visited for a good few number of year 6 maybe more.

I was shocked and horrified at how much wear this place has had and the amount of damaged rock that is just left to wether and degrade without even such a thought of stabilising the surface with super glue.

I left the area that day feeling very down on the venue especially as the locals have tried to cultivate the land at the bottom ( which I don't think they own. Well they never did when I lived in the area) and are now complaining about climbers disturbing the gardens etc. anyway when I heard about the RHS damage it made me feel really sad.

But my main point here is ( and I count myself in this as well) we are contributing to this wear and tear, but where do we draw the line. When do we say, ok we won't use these venues for x years to try and slow down this process. I don't know if anything can be done bu what is for sure is these areas look a mess and it is our fault.
Offwidth - on 20 Feb 2013
In reply to Tony Simpson:

Sure we contribute but I feel you are exagerating slightly about Rowtor and the impact of climbers needn't be so apocalyptic. The issue is some rock erodes faster than other rock, especially soft gritstone when the surface layer has gone and particularly when it is damp. Another huge factor is dirty feet when combined with sloppy footwork: this erodes orders of magnnitude more than clean feet and clean technique. People should remove dirt before climbing and keep their feet still on holds and avoid damp problems (more so when the surface has gone). The routes at Rowtor face away from problems (the woman who keeps chickens) are quite good and actually need more traffic.

Walter Mitty - on 14 Mar 2013
In reply to geordiepie: clearly a climber then
Walter Mitty - on 14 Mar 2013
In reply to GrahamD: c'mon get real!. This is clearly a climber, or more to the point an ex-climber who can't stand climbers anymore!. There are a lot of them around.
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Nye Meerkat - on 14 Mar 2013
In reply to Ramblin dave: I have climbed at Rowtor and had a certain local Lady very much not acting like a chicken (ahem) be very vociferous about chalk use, and how it is "illegal in Germany", not to mention an extremely rude attitude towards us.
She was, how might I put this, rather strident in her opposition to any climbing in the area...

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