/ Trek Madone 5 - the perfect compromise?

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Aberdeen Rambler - on 21 Feb 2013
Having returned to road bikes via a Ribble Sportive I have gotthe bug and really enjoyed some sportives and time trials last season. Now I have started to wonder about getting a bike better suited to racing and the Tek Madone has caught my eye - aero & light frame ... Is it the next step ? I have also seen some criticism of Trek on these pages - is there any good basis for this ?

Also been daydreaming of Scott Foils - the Madone seems to be a more comfortable Foil..

thoughts/ experience appreciated
Toby_W on 21 Feb 2013
In reply to Aberdeen Rambler:

Loads of my friends have Treks. Look lovely, I think one or two had frame problems but this was also true with specialized frames in both cases within a week or two they were replaced under warranty.

The most important thing is which one makes you smile.

Have a look at the Cannondales, I think the super 6 has been bike of the year or scored top in the C+ tests a few times and again being a big American bike company they back their warranty (quickly) if there are problems. Some companies can take a while and be a nightmare to deal with even if they do eventually get there in the end months later.

Cheers

Toby
Lord of Starkness - on 21 Feb 2013
In reply to Aberdeen Rambler:

I'll give my mate's firm Onix a plug. http://www.onixbikes.co.uk/

He was just setting his company up and doing the frame development and testing work after I'd already bought my Ribble Gran Fondo, or else I'd have probably bought one even though they're a bit pricier.

The RH (Rob Hayles) signature models do look the 'canines gonads' and apparently ride very well.
nr on 21 Feb 2013
In reply to Aberdeen Rambler:

http://www.spinmyride.com/

Surprisingly inexpensive for titanium. The MkX was initially designed for criterium racing, but is beautifully comfy for tootling around on. The MkIII has more relaxed geometry if you want something a bit softer round the edges.

Both are beautifully put together, and the frames come with a lifetime warranty.

nr.
Aberdeen Rambler - on 21 Feb 2013
In reply to Lord of Starkness:
The question with ONIX is what is the quality of the frame material? Having been delighted (though my judgement is of limited value as my experience of different bikes is very limited) with the Ribble I am listening to the critics and wondering what exactly the frame material is, and is it suitable?
Lord of Starkness - on 21 Feb 2013
In reply to Aberdeen Rambler:
> (In reply to Lord of Starkness)
> The question with ONIX is what is the quality of the frame material? Having been delighted (though my judgement is of limited value as my experience of different bikes is very limited) with the Ribble I am listening to the critics and wondering what exactly the frame material is, and is it suitable?

Even though Onix are a relatively new company, I don't think a multiple Olympic and Worlds medallist of Rob Hayles stature would put his name to anything that's not of sufficient quality. He was actually involved in a lot of the original product testing work -- (though at the time Onix were sworn to secrecy due to Rob's involvement with team GB).

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Dave Kerr - on 21 Feb 2013
In reply to Aberdeen Rambler:

I wonder when Trek will rename the Madone series given the rather central role the Col de la Madone played in Armstrong and co's doping activities.

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