/ My first Ski tour - Thank you Braemar Mountain Rescue et al.

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David Barratt - on 24 Feb 2013
Got lost on the Glenshee Plateau last night and had to be rescued. Really very embarrassed to have made such a basic navigation error but thought I'd share to say thanks to all those involved.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o8DP_a-q_k8
David Barratt - on 24 Feb 2013
In reply to David Barratt: My first ever ski tour did not go well! As planned I skied up Carn an Tuirc and then towards Cairn of Claise. I am used to navigating when walking, but due to moving faster with skis and a bit of complacency, I over shot my next point and did not notice quick enough. By the time I realised I was in the wrong place, I was off my map sheet and unable to identify any features. I took a bearing in a North West direction to try and get back to somewhere identifiable. After some time, it got dark and clouds came in. Visibility was down to a few meters. I called Mountain rescue for assistance who then told me to stay put and wait for them.... VERY embarrassing, But I had the right kit and was warm in my emergency shelter. Mountain rescue picked me up at 11pm and were happy that I understood what had gone wrong and that after my mistake I made the right decisions. So nothing damaged other than my pride (and a finger).
David Barratt - on 24 Feb 2013
In reply to David Barratt: Additional point, The dodgy skiing at the beginning was due to trying to avoid rocks and then loosing control on the ice. After that point I had no problems (other than the obvious)
Milesy - on 24 Feb 2013
Maybe a bit late but if you dont know where you are but can make out other peaks (you dont need to know what they are) you can get to a high point of where you currently are, take a bearing by eye to the peaks/summits close by (or few). You can then draw across your map with the bearings and find a position on your map that would allow you to draw a line to one or more summits from it. Easier said in theory rather in the panic of being lost though :) a technique worth learning though if you have good visibility.
David Barratt - on 24 Feb 2013
In reply to Milesy: Thanks. I'm definitely learning from the experience. The initial error and subsequent panic lost me a lot of time. by the time I realised what direction I needed to be going it was too late. Thanks for the input though.
jamesofdeath - on 24 Feb 2013
In reply to David Barratt:

* And Tayside MRT. And Rescue 131.
David Barratt - on 24 Feb 2013
In reply to jamesofdeath: Thanks, Wasn't sure about the RAF details.
Luke Brooks - on 24 Feb 2013
In reply to David Barratt: As an aside: very cool video.
In reply to Luke Brooks:
> As an aside: very cool video.

It is all rather smoothly edited but David is a braver man than me putting it up on the internet! :) If the falling of Aladdin's Mirror Direct video is anything to go by, you can expect a harsh ride!

David - when you first realised you weren't sure where you were, could you not just retrace your steps? Follow your own tracks back? The video at least give the impression that the weather was still quite good then. I know that navigating in the mist when skiing can be really hard as your skis seem to turn you to the fall line on their own and in thick cloud you can find yourself going in a very different direction quickly. Years back, I bought a wrist compass so I could check roughly that I was staying on bearing when skiing in bad conditions.
David Barratt - on 24 Feb 2013
In reply to TobyA: Retracing is effectively what I was doing in the end. just should have started sooner. I accept I'll get a bit of flack, but that'll just add to the learning. The video is smooth, the navigation decisions were not!
grithugger on 24 Feb 2013 - host86-191-131-32.wlms-broadband.com
In reply to David Barratt: ha ha,you will definitely learn from that experience!
Now i think you owe it to the mrt members to get on a nav course,buy the books ,swot up and practice in the hills(with an experienced partner!).

All in all a nice film,a small f**k up and a great learning experience!



Grithugger
Dave Kerr - on 25 Feb 2013
In reply to David Barratt:

Bearings are mainly for when you can't see. When you have good vis you should be able to confirm your position by matching what you see to the map.

Lost in clear weather? As they say where I'm from 'that's a pure beamer'

Still, no harm done eh?
Flat4matt - on 25 Feb 2013
In reply to David Barratt:

Cracking video and really nicley edited!
Very brave for posting up!

Another interesting video that didnt run as planned and we will all learn lessons from, fair play!!

Well, done MRT!!
Gael Force - on 25 Feb 2013
In reply to Flat4matt: I've got to say the only thing Ive learned from this video is what an absolute buffoon the poster was.
If I made a total arse of myself and inconvenienced the RAF and a mountain rescue team I wouldn't be boasting about it on the internet.
People like you are why I gave up mountain rescue after 20 years, I had more to do with my time.
Personally, I think you should pay the helicopter costs.
paraffin on 25 Feb 2013
In reply to David Barratt:

Well done on the attention seeking.
nickyrannoch on 25 Feb 2013
In reply to David Barratt:

I think the OP has stated he is embarrassed and wishes to thank those involved. i dont see any bragging or attention seeking here.

IMHO the the nav error was forgiveable but the inability to correct that shows an insufficient grasp of navigation skills.

However, by posting this the OP has allowed that discussion to take place, has learned something himself and so might some others who have read the thread.

never ceases to amaze me the amount of people who come out of the womb with an intimate knowlesge of mountaincraft who have never made an error in their time on the mountains.

I'm not above castigating those who's errors are down to arrogance, stupidity etc but this seems like an hoest error compunded by a bit of inexperience.
paraffin on 25 Feb 2013
In reply to nickyrannoch:

> IMHO the the nav error was forgiveable but the inability to correct that shows an insufficient grasp of navigation skills.
>
Agreed - the OP appears to be lost in time & space. His log of the account does not tally. i.e. time taken, time of sunset, lost mobile phone signal etc. etc.

ScraggyGoat on 25 Feb 2013
Obviously we have to be greatful that the OP didn't come to a sticky end ski-ing off something, for both his own sake, and for not providing the press with another mountain fatality with which to fuel thier little anti-hill goer campaign.

However it might be better for the OP to write in person to thank the assests involved, rather than do it publicy and provide you-tube evidence for all an sundry to interpret in whatever biased manner they choose......whch may of course in include the press look at this 'we keep saying not to go on the hill in winter, and look what happened to this chap...' sub text to the non-hill going public 'idiot'...they should all be banned!
Simon Wells - on 25 Feb 2013
In reply to David Barratt:

Dear Dave,

Don't listen to the moaners and whingers. Well done for being honest and thanks for a great video. learning from our mistakes is how must us aquire our wisdom.

Hope you get some more tours in!

Simon
Jim Hamilton - on 25 Feb 2013
In reply to Simon Wells:
> Don't listen to the moaners and whingers. Well done for being honest and thanks for a great video. learning from our mistakes is how must us aquire our wisdom.

As with the AMD video, the Persian quotation Tilman quoted in his one of books springs to mind - "the wise man sits on the hole in his carpet"
David Barratt - on 25 Feb 2013
In reply to Simon Wells: Thanks. I have thanked those involved directly. I expect some less than constructive criticism but hope that others can learn from my error/s. Touring done for this year I think, but I'll be up there again next year. I'll spend next weekend in familiar territory, climbing, hiking or skiing on piste.
MG - on 25 Feb 2013
In reply to Milesy: If you can see other peaks you are hardly likely to be lost, I would think!
Gael Force - on 25 Feb 2013
In reply to parafinn: There is a problem with some attention seeking weirdo's who go out pretend they are lost etc and then call the mountain rescue, there have been some well documented cases, not sure if Braemar didn't have one a few years ago, again around the Glenshee area.
This case seems to fit the bill quite well as the facts don't add up if examined carefully, and now we have a video posted of our hero for everybody to look at.
Having managed to get "lost" in good visibility why did the OP not just keep walking, all night if necessary instead of expecting others to give up their time, and indeed having a helicopter undertake an unnecessary flight. Helicopter flights always have an element of risk as I know from first hand experience and many countries would make people behaving irresponsibly like this pay for the cost of the flight.
JamButty - on 25 Feb 2013
In reply to Gael Force: I can't watch the video in work, but your comments seem a bit harsh to me.

OP perhaps a donation to the the local MR's involved will be a good step.

Glad you're safe, and can practice a bit more Nav

OwenM - on 25 Feb 2013
In reply to David Barratt: Why were you on your own? Surely when trying something new, which you're clearly not sure about, wouldn't it have been better to go along with someone who does know what their doing. You can afford fancy cameras and ski gear but not a navigation course.
NottsRich on 25 Feb 2013
In reply to David Barratt: Again, I can't see the video at work, so forgive me if my question is answered in it.

How did MRT find you, if you didn't know where you were? Genuine question!
Cuthbert on 25 Feb 2013
In reply to David Barratt:

Fair doos for putting that up and inviting comment but I think you made a fundamental mistake even before you set off on the hill - you thought you had enough experience to make sound judgements. It wasn't the lack of a bearing or otherwise, it was a lack of experience as a winter mountaineer (not the speed travelled on skis) that caught you out.

So before you go on the hill again, make sure you consider if you over extend yourself which you did this time.

I think presumed experience and a lack of real mountain experience is a factor in a fair few recent incidents. People think they are experienced because they have little to say they arent through peers or presumptions about winter in the Scottish Mountains.
Postmanpat on 25 Feb 2013
In reply to David Barratt:
> (In reply to Simon Wells) I'll spend next weekend in familiar territory, climbing, hiking or skiing on piste.

Not being much of a winter mountaineer I hesitate to ask but: you've done a winter mountaineering course and you choose to go high level ski touring, in Scotland, in mid February and don't carry gloves?

Did I understand that correctly?

blurty - on 25 Feb 2013
In reply to David Barratt:

I can't watch the video at work, but I got caught out years ago when I first started, skiing in crap vis, not appreciating how fast you cover ground on skis. Ended up down into the wrong valley! (Bought a GPS subsequently!).

Don't listen to the grumpy buggers on this forum, learn from your mistakes
Cuthbert on 25 Feb 2013
In reply to blurty:

It's not grumpy, it's sensible. There are more and more people who believe they have the skills and experience to make informed choices in the hills. They often don't but don't know that they dont, to quote my namesake!

The basic problem with the OP was lack of sound mountain judgment which led to a situation where his lack of hill skills put him in a further problematic situation. The mistake happened before the skis left the road.
Scomuir on 25 Feb 2013
In reply to David Barratt:
There's lots about your outing that i don't get, and apart from the obvious, I can't help wondering why you were carrying a blue rubber duck with you (about 1:08 into the clip), and not a GPS?
Tricky Dicky - on 25 Feb 2013
In reply to OwenM:
> (In reply to David Barratt) Surely when trying something new, which you're clearly not sure about, wouldn't it have been better to go along with someone who does know what their doing.

Agree with this, I think it applies to all outdoor adventerous activities. If you haven't done it before, go with somebody who has (or at least don't go on your own.)

Still, nobody's perfect (I've done some daft things in the past) and I'm glad you're OK.
Gael Force - on 25 Feb 2013
I agree we have all made mistakes, but what I don't understand is calling the mountain rescue out and then filming everything.
Whats wrong with walking out it's hardly the middle of the polar ice cap?
How many of us have called the MRT when slightly lost?
Was this the intent from the start?
Weird!!
Sonya Mc on 25 Feb 2013
In reply to Gael Force: David climbs down at my local wall and I don't think he'd do this sort of thing purposely, especially as one of the MR guys who may have been involved (he certainly was involved in the other call out that evening of 2 people on the Kilbo path earlier in the eve) works at the very same wall :D

He's a young lad and I should imagine got a bit scared finding he was lost and on his own and without the skill to find his way back down. The filming was perhaps killing time while he waited for MR?

But sorry David, you're a muppet for posting your video on here :D (though I quite liked the way you had your skis over the map and the line of your ski tour).
Can your Uni club not organise a navigation and micro navigation course for it's members? And perhaps an avalanche awareness course also if you're going to get into ski touring?
SteveCarter - on 25 Feb 2013
In reply to David Barratt:
Everyone makes mistakes.... but no gloves...?
Erik B - on 25 Feb 2013
In reply to David Barratt: just watched your excellent video production. I suspect your video production skills are much better than your skiing and mountain skills.

honestly what is the world coming to? maybe that odious bint grace-elder has a point?!

please please please people, for the love of christ stop making these movies! its not doing our cause/freedom any good!!!
Douglas Griffin - on 25 Feb 2013
In reply to Erik B:

> maybe that odious bint grace-elder has a point?!

It's funny, but that was my first (involuntary) thought on seeing the video last night.
paraffin on 25 Feb 2013
In reply to Erik B:
+ that.

I log on to UKC for entertainment rather than educational purposes.

This video comes across as unintentional tragi-comedy.

It has some parallels with the Coen Bros Oscar winning Fargo. It is set in the snow and the characters seem helplessly drawn to disaster.

Seems only fair that the Barrat Bros watch all 94 minutes of Fargo in return for the 304 views x 2 mins 35 secs of viewing their production has had so far. Then tell us all, what lessons can be drawn from Fargo - cos the Coen Bros will never let on.

xplorer on 25 Feb 2013
In reply to David Barratt:

Everybody can get lost, I'm sure we have all been there in some respect.

Why's everyone worried about the press. Who cares what they print, just don't read it and let yourself be lied to!

There will always be accidents and mishaps, ignore them your a fool, instead learn by them.

You were always going to get the average UKC user trying to ruin your day even more. Ignore them, no doubt they didn't manage to get out over the weekend.
paraffin on 25 Feb 2013
Learn from your mistakes?

Is that a template for avoidance?

Would it not be better to follow & learn from the masters at this game?
marmot hunter - on 25 Feb 2013
In reply to parafinn:
Entertaining film which also puts some serious points over.
David Barratt - on 25 Feb 2013
In reply to David Barratt: It would be pretty hard to sum up all the questions asked... but I had gloves, didn't put them on at the beginning of the day. The day was down so genuine error and yes, inexperience. I should not have gone out touring alone for the first time. I was not paying attention to my navigation. If I had given proper attention to the navigation, I would never have got into a situation where my navigation skills were inadequate, but I arsed up so bad that the were. I accept these errors were stupid.
xplorer on 25 Feb 2013
In reply to parafinn:

The masters of this game. Haha

One guess your a guide
IainRUK - on 25 Feb 2013
In reply to David Barratt:
> (In reply to David Barratt) It would be pretty hard to sum up all the questions asked... but I had gloves, didn't put them on at the beginning of the day. The day was down so genuine error and yes, inexperience. I should not have gone out touring alone for the first time. I was not paying attention to my navigation. If I had given proper attention to the navigation, I would never have got into a situation where my navigation skills were inadequate, but I arsed up so bad that the were. I accept these errors were stupid.

I don't see why being solo is an issue..

You went out, had a go, screwed up, made a sensible decision and live to go again..

Erik B - on 25 Feb 2013
In reply to IainRUK: dear god man, watch the tips of his skis before he falls on his arse..!! this man should not be heading out ski touring on his own!
Erik B - on 25 Feb 2013
In reply to parafinn: more tragi than comedy though?, bloody great prduction skills eh?! Im thinking its more Threads than Fargo
paraffin on 25 Feb 2013
In reply to xplorer:
> (In reply to parafinn)
>
> The masters of this game. Haha
>
> One guess your a guide

Ha, ha, ha, ha, ha!

Girl Guide maybe? Keep guessing.

paraffin on 25 Feb 2013
In reply to Erik B:

Just love it don't you?
I am up for a bit of skiing at the mighty one this week before going back to work Monday. Get in touch.

Davie


xplorer on 25 Feb 2013
In reply to parafinn:

Ahhhhhh

A big eared skier

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