/ A Days Pack

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Anhibian - on 27 Feb 2013
What do people pack for a day out on the mountain? And how big are your packs? Everyone seems to have smaller backpacks than me!
Pinkney - on 27 Feb 2013
In reply to Anhibian:

I've got a 32l sack and inside it can fit...
a small/half rack
60m Half rope
Synthetic belay jacket
Couple of pairs of gloves
Helmet
1l bottle of water
Sandwiches/various snacks
Map/compass/GPS
Head torch
Foil sleeping bag thing
Crampons and axes on the outside.
Over trousers and jacket go in too if not being worn

It's a bit of a squeeze but it does the job.
martinph78 on 27 Feb 2013
In reply to Anhibian: Depends where I'm going, what the weather is doing/likely to do, who I am with, what I am doing etc.

Usually make do with a 32 litre pack, but have a 50+10 for everything that's not big enough for.

Milesy - on 27 Feb 2013
Map + Compass
Headtorch
Emergency GPS. Dont use it.
Spare batteries (for headtorch or GPS)
Cheap orange survival bag.
1L water.
4 choc bars.
caffeine + paracetamol tablets.

Goretex trousers, jacket, Gloves and Hat normally stay in sack until gearing up.

Then harness, rope, rack (or part of), helmet. Axes and crampons.

Once geared up my sack is virtually empty.
Milesy - on 27 Feb 2013
I dont take spare layers or stuff I wont definately use any more as it just slows me down.
Snoweider - on 27 Feb 2013
In reply to Anhibian:

I use a 45 litre Macpac Pursuit Classic. Its a bit of a beast when full but I carry as standard in winter:

Map, compass, headtorch plus spares.
Mobile phone. I have an EPIRB if I'm solo but will leave behind if there are 2 of us.
Big gloves, small gloves and emergency mitts (poss more depending on weather)
Hat and spare balaclava
Goggles/shades
Synthetic duvet jacket.
Waterproof trousers (I wear Paramo Aspira smock so this is usually on, not in pack)
Survival bag
One of us will have the 1st aid kit and the other may carry a bothy or snow shovel, depending on whether we are walking/climbing (leave this behind if climbing).
Tons of food (I'm a pig and I get low blood sugar quite easily)
1 litre of hot squash.
Crampons/axe/rope/rack etc depending on activity

I expect this is more than most people but I like a bit of comfort on the hill.
BnB - on 27 Feb 2013
In reply to Anhibian:

For winter, from bottom up:

Silver survival bag (unless we're cutting grams)
Lightest cheapest throwaway waterproof trousers
Spare gloves
Goggles
Belay jacket
Crampons
Winter Rack (set of wires, torque nuts, couple of hexes to fill in the gaps, QDs, Bug, HMS, screws, slings)
Half rope either 30m (solo days, mountaineering/moving together, mmmmm... nice and light...) or 50m (climbing)
Proshell waterproof
Water bladder/bottle
Gloves
Hat
2 x torch
Compass
Lunch

Axes, helmet and gaiters strapped outside, map or guidebook in softshell pocket.

All this in a 35 litre pack (just). Have I forgotten anything? It would all go much better in a 40 litre. Sometimes it's easier to just wear the rack from the off. It seems to me to weigh less on the hips than on the back and creates plenty of space in the pack. Anyone else feel that way?




goose299 - on 27 Feb 2013
In reply to BnB:
No harness?
BnB - on 27 Feb 2013
In reply to goose299: As the rack is fairly minimal it lives on the harness. I should have explained. I use a lightweight BD Alpine Bod with leg clips for easy on/off over crampons.
Snoweider - on 27 Feb 2013
In reply to goose299:
> (In reply to BnB)
> No harness?

Oh yeah, I might have one of those... Doh!
Robert Durran - on 27 Feb 2013
In reply to BnB:

> It would all go much better in a 40 litre.

So why not use a 40l sack then?

> Sometimes it's easier to just wear the rack from the off.

Don't cams and hexes bouncing around your thighs drive you nuts?

> It seems to me to weigh less on the hips than on the back.

Well it doesn't!
BnB - on 27 Feb 2013
In reply to Robert Durran:
> (In reply to BnB)
>
> So why not use a 40l sack then?
>
Because you spend in haste and repent at leisure
>
> Don't cams and hexes bouncing around your thighs drive you nuts?
>
Those Torque Nuts make a racket I agree but you can tune the dyneema lengths to minimise noise
>
> Well it doesn't!

Don't underestimate the mind's ability to fool itself!!
Nath93 - on 27 Feb 2013
In reply to Anhibian: In order;

Belay jacket (mitts in the pockets)
Rope
Half rack
Harness
Crampons
Waterproofs
Helmet (lunch stowed inside)
Gloves
Litre of water or flask of fruit tea

In the lid goes map, compass, buff, headlamp etc. Axes got on the compression straps. Got a 3/4 foam mat cut up to fit into the bladder pouch as a lightweight back support or emergency bivi mat if shit hits the fan (also works well for flaking the rope in summer)Just about all fits into a 35l but i'm too poor to afford anything bigger which is as good as my current sack.

Carry whatever else in my pockets.
BnB - on 27 Feb 2013
In reply to BnB:

Did I mention Haribo?!
The Ex-Engineer - on 27 Feb 2013
In reply to Anhibian: I've currently got a POD Alpine 50 and I did think before the start of this Winter season that it might be a bit on the large size for Scottish Winter mountaineering and climbing. The rapid conclusion was that it isn't.

Some days I could certainly get away with a smaller pack. However, with the Alpine 50 I can always get everything I need packed inside which wouldn't be the case with something smaller.

I haven't done it yet, but it can be stripped down if I did want to cut weight so I see little to be gained, for me at least, in having a pack in the 40 litre range.

For summer rock routes and the Alps something much smaller is probably ideal.
dutybooty - on 27 Feb 2013
In reply to Anhibian:

This is for the walk in

26L sack.

Helmet and rope (these fit on special straps sort of outside the lid)
Mitts
Waterproof Gloves
Soft Shell Gloves
Soft Shell Jacket
Primaloft Jacket
Hardshell Jacket and Trew
Map
Compass
Shovel and Probe (when appropriate)
Half the rack (normally a few screws, a hex or two, half a set of nuts, 2/3 cams and a few quickdraws/slings)
Harness + belay device
Crampons
Goggles/Sunglasses in case
Balaclava
Beanie
1ltr water
bit of a snack (normally a pack of moralibo)
Gaitors
Foil bag thing
Probably a few other small bits and bobs I forgot.

Its a real squeeze, but as you only really pack this all at the car/back on a nice bit of ground it seems worth it to me.

When climbing? In pack is just hardshells, water and snack, belay jacket, gaitors and spare gloves. The sack just looks empty.
Milesy - on 27 Feb 2013
In reply to dutybooty:
> bit of a snack (normally a pack of moralibo)

I read that as a bit of smack haha
steveshaking - on 27 Feb 2013
In reply to dutybooty: I get similar in a 30L sac, it does have a forgiving skirt if it doesn't go back in as neatly at the end of the day. Helmet likely to be on the outside. I much prefer this to less full 40L sack as its not harder to carry and much easier to climb with - doesn't get caught up as easily, almost forget it, which you can't with a big pack.
Milesy - on 27 Feb 2013
I have a 40 but it has compression straps so job done once everything is out it.
Andy Syme - on 27 Feb 2013
In reply to BnB: totally agree, put rack on harness and it seems to weigh far less :-)
ads.ukclimbing.com
dutybooty - on 27 Feb 2013
In reply to steveshaking:
> (In reply to dutybooty) ... it does have a forgiving skirt if it doesn't go back in as neatly at the end of the day. ... doesn't get caught up as easily, almost forget it, which you can't with a big pack.


Exactly. Mine doesn't have an extending lid, but I get all that in at the start cinched up tight, so a little looser and it fits fine, just a tiniest bit less head movement. Teaches you not to look up!

And not getting caught up has huge advantages
ffati - on 27 Feb 2013
In reply to Anhibian:
60 meter rope
Half a rack
Harness
Crampons
Soft shell gloves
Thickish gloves
Datchstines
Patagonia nano puff
Belay jacket
Half liter water
Snack
Gogles
Map etc
Axes outside all in a osprey mutant 28 without the lid
ffati - on 27 Feb 2013
In reply to Anhibian: o and helmet also in bag hate stuff outside bag!!
Robert Durran - on 27 Feb 2013
In reply to Anhibian:

What are people doing with their gaitors in their sack? What's that all about?
BnB - on 28 Feb 2013
In reply to Robert Durran: My gaiters only go on at same time as crampons, and only then if snow is fresh and deep. Otherwise they really aren't necessary unless you like having hot sweaty ankles!!
a lakeland climber on 28 Feb 2013
In reply to ffati:

Pretty much the same except no belay jacket but add camera and first aid kit. Axes and crampons on outside of sack. Easy in a 35litre sack, needs a bit of thought with a 30 litre one.

ALC
martinph78 on 28 Feb 2013
In reply to BnB: Ditto. Can't stand wearing gaiters, only use them to protect my trousers from crampons!
mkean - on 28 Feb 2013
In reply to Anhibian:
I was reading this thread and wondering at all the people who only take half a rack and a half rope with them, then it suddenly occurred to me. I've been carrying all my partners gear and mine. In all fairness they normally carry my lunch.
Robert Durran - on 28 Feb 2013
In reply to BnB:
> (In reply to Robert Durran) My gaiters only go on at same time as crampons, and only then if snow is fresh and deep.

Fair enough (I don't use them at all now I have some flashy soft shell trousers with built in mini gaiters), but someone said they would be in their sack while climbing!
Irk the Purist - on 28 Feb 2013
In reply to Anhibian:

Lots of people NOT carrying first aid kits which is pretty incredible really.

Euge - on 28 Feb 2013
In reply to Snoweider: Nope.. that is about the same as mine...

E
Milesy - on 28 Feb 2013
In reply to Eric the Red:
> Lots of people NOT carrying first aid kits which is pretty incredible really.

Paracetamol and Caffeine I carry as they can be very useful. Cleaning out wounds or something isnt something I would likely be doing on the hill. If I needed to stop blood flowing I can always improvise with many bits of kit or clothing.

What exactly do you have in your first aid kit? Defib? Surgical kit? :)
CurlyStevo - on 28 Feb 2013
In reply to Eric the Red:
All you really need is a bandage, a couple of plasters, a small amount of zinc tape and some paracetamol in a plastic bag, weighs next to nothing.
dutybooty - on 28 Feb 2013
In reply to Robert Durran:
> but someone said they would be in their sack while climbing!

That would be me if there wasn't deep snow on route.
Anhibian - on 28 Feb 2013
In reply to Robert Durran:

> Don't cams and hexes bouncing around your thighs drive you nuts?
>
Aha! I am at least going to give you credit for that

mick taylor - on 28 Feb 2013
In reply to Eric the Red: Depending on the current status, I may take some anusol. And duct tape. And a whistle (not all form the same situation)
iksander on 28 Feb 2013
I have a 40l bag. During the walk-in it would have:

Rack and/or 60m Half rope
Synthetic belay jacket with shell mitts in pockets
1 pairs climbing gloves (swap for walkin gloves after gearing up)
Helmet
Harness
Gerber multitool
500cl bottle of water/ electrolyte (I drink 1-2 litres at the car beforehand) with duct tape around it
Snacks: nuts, cheese, salami, halva, jelly beans, flapjack etc.
Map/compass/Phone
Head torch
SOL foil bivvy bag
Crampons (one stainless steel ziptie in the bag)
Axes (swap for poles when climbing)
Waterproofs
Zip bag with FAK - 4" NATO trauma bandage, naproxen, 10ml woundwash, dioralyte sachet, 1 pair rubber gloves, "hot hands" chemical handwarmers

Last week was one of those very rare occasions where the forecast was so solid that I didn't wear or take waterproofs.
sweenyt - on 28 Feb 2013
In reply to Eric the Red:
You don't really need very much for a first aid kit, so I take one, it contains:

paracetamol
ibuprofen
codeine
tampons

that's it. If immobilisation is needed there are enough slings/ropes/axes around to bodge something, tampons fill puncture wounds, held in by tape, pills stop it hurting/swelling.

That will be enough to wait for the MRT... though not taking one, not too much of a problem really, it will just hurt more, puncture wounds can be filled with fingers/clothes etc.
Irk the Purist - on 28 Feb 2013
In reply to Milesy:
"I dont take spare layers or stuff I wont definately use any more as it just slows me down."

So you don't have spare layers but you can stem bloodflow with many bits of clothing? Bits of clothing you should be wearing as you don't carry any spare presumably. In winter.

A first aid kit of a few banadages, a bit of tape and some dressings (more absorbant than primaloft I find) weighs about 150g and packs into a space the size of a rolled up pair of socks. I'm not one of these St John's ambulance nerds for whom first aid is a hobby, but I always carry a first aid kit.

I was surprised that many people were not carrying anything at all.



Irk the Purist - on 28 Feb 2013
In reply to sweenyt:

I respect your right, but I go onto the hills with the attitude that I will get off again on my own. My kit reflects that and I don't base it on 'waiting for MRT' which could take many hours to happen and relies on volunteers. I find it odd that you carry tampons but not bandages.

Anyway, I never wanted to turn this into a first aid kit debate (which can rage for hours) so I'll bow out now. Carry on.

Milesy - on 28 Feb 2013
In reply to Eric the Red:
> So you don't have spare layers but you can stem bloodflow with many bits of clothing? Bits of clothing you should be wearing as you don't carry any spare presumably. In winter.

I reckon I could sacrifice the sleeve of my micro fleece or another layer in an emergency. A piece of cord, a sling. Strapping from my rucksack. The spare bootlace I carry. I might consider some dressing so consider your job done. ;)
sweenyt - on 28 Feb 2013
In reply to Eric the Red:
haha, yeah I agree about not turning it into a first aid debate.

Very briefly, the reason for tampons not bandages is that they are VERY absorbent, fit into puncture wounds better, can be pulled apart and taped onto cuts, so do all that bandages can do plus more.

Re waiting for MRT, in general I agree with you, but some injuries will be too severe for this, others will be time critical. If with a lot of pills for the pain, some strapping to keep things still and an attempt at stopping blood loss you still can't get down on your own, it is IMHO time to get on the phone. Even with a full trauma kit I doubt I'd be able to get someone that badly injured off on my own.

Anyway, its a personal choice - I don't think there is a right or wrong answer at all.

H
ralphio - on 28 Feb 2013
In reply to Anhibian: Just out of interest, how do people pack their rope? I tend to just fold mine into coils, fold in half again, then shove it in the bottom of my back but it seems to take up loads of room and leave a lot of dead spce that i cant use. Any tips?
xplorer on 28 Feb 2013
In reply to ralphio:

Shake the bag about. The rope fills the dead spaces
iksander on 28 Feb 2013
In reply to ralphio: Pack your rope under your sack lid?
iksander on 28 Feb 2013
Nath93 - on 28 Feb 2013
In reply to ralphio: I tend to use a single large sized liner rather than separate smaller dry bags and then crush everything into the bigger bag in whatever order they'll be needed most. I just coil my rope and fold it in half and stuff it in and push it down as far as it will go and then more. That's with a 50m single so would be much easier with a skinny 50m double.

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