/ Ghyll scrambling environmental considerations

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goose299 - on 02 Mar 2013
Hi

Been lumbered with the section talking about this for a uni project.
Does anyone know any papers/journals that talk about ghyll scrambling and erosion specifically? So far, I've just used generic papers about footpath erosion and water erosion
marsbar - on 02 Mar 2013
In reply to goose299: I suspect the water will cause more erosion than the scramblers. I can only think of generic things like transport, and possible damage to the banks if lots of people get in and out at the same place.
Jon Stewart - on 02 Mar 2013
In reply to goose299:

It's hardly a new craze that's sweeping the nation. I'd be surprised if you find any specific research, and if you did some I think you'd be hard pushed to find any evidence of a problem, unless there were extremely rare plant species that could be damaged by the passage of a few feet.
butteredfrog - on 02 Mar 2013
In reply to goose299:

The only ghyll I can think of that might have been subject to a study is Stonycroft ghyll, nr Keswick. Its used regularly by groups from the outdoor centres and sees conciderable footfall.
sargy - on 03 Mar 2013
In reply to goose299:
How about Chrurch Beck in Coniston? It's subject to a user agreement, so there maybe some studies available?
sbc_10 - on 03 Mar 2013
In reply to goose299:

Yes, I'm with Jon on this one. The number of people you meet on crag based scrambles is very few for the large part of the year, let alone the Ghylls, even though it is meant to be quite a popular activity.
Yearly floods and sediment transport will scour a lot more vegetation than the handful of scramblers. As a scrambler myself, you do tend to look for the clean rock as a preference for handhold/footholds instead of vegetated areas when on routes.
What may be of interest is the path that is created in getting to a scramble, because these are not the obvious or natural lines of ascent for a hillside. They will be caused by people doing a particular route.
KellyKettle - on 03 Mar 2013
In reply to Jon Stewart:
> (In reply to goose299)
>
> unless there were extremely rare plant species that could be damaged by the passage of a few feet.

That's exactly the problem that some of the operations in Snowdonia have to deal with, due to rare lichens...

Also don't forget that in the lower reaches of a ghyll salmon redds can be disturbed by people walking on the gravel, exactly how vulnerable they are is a matter of some contention... but they are legally protected by SAFFA (Salmon And Freshwater Fisheries Act 1975)!
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goose299 - on 03 Mar 2013
In reply to goose299:
Yeh, we're running our session at stonycroft.
all worthwhile points, and some that are new to me. Anyone know of any evidence as I'll get pulled apart without references

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