/ Dolomites without a car

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Ed Saint on 11 Mar 2013
Hi there,

I was just wondering if anyone knew how good the bus links are in the Dolomites during the Summer? I'll probably be based in Cortina, and would be interested to know how accessible the wider area is by bus.

Many thanks

Ed
silhouette - on 11 Mar 2013
In reply to Ed Saint: I am trying to find out exactly the same information; certainly it is easy to get to Cortina by bus; there is a regular service from the railhaed at Calalzo; additionally there are some fast services from Venice and Mestre. I know there's an out-and-back service from Cortina to Misurina via Tre Croci. i am not sure if there is a summer service extending from Misurina to Rif Auronzo near Tre Cime di Lavaredo. I have heard somewhere that such a service starts early July. Can't confirm that.
Further west, there's a circular bus several times a day around the Sella group - Sella Ronde bus? (calls at Selva, Colfosco, Corvara, Canazei, sella pass and runs in both directions; Canazei can be reached on a slow but frequent bus from Trento and Selva on a frequent bus from Chiusa. What i can't work out is whether there's a summer service from Cortina, west via Falzarego. to link with the aforementioned Sella Ronde bus.
Can't remember which website is which but try searching on "dolomiti bus", SAD bus, SellaRonde bus, Trentino bus, and a site which has all public transport in the Tirol, both Italy and Austri. Also the trenitalia site. Let me know if you answer any of my missing info.
sarahlizzy - on 11 Mar 2013
In reply to Ed Saint:

It can be done, but it will eat into your days significantly. Based in Cortina, you'll struggle to do much in Val Badia, Val Gardena and especially the Val Di Fassa. It's complicated by the watersheds being the boundaries between the Veneto (Cortina, Val Fodom), Sudtirol (Badia, Gardena) and Trentino (Fassa). There's not fantastic interconnect between them.

Realistically, if you're doing it by bus, you're probably best sticking to the valley you're based in. There is a lot to do in Cortina though, especially if you're there for the ferratas.
Miranda on 11 Mar 2013
In reply to sarahlizzy:
Agreed there is a lot to do in Cortina.
And hitch-hiking is an option if you get to the bus stop at the end of your route after the last bus has gone. Worked for us.
sarahlizzy - on 11 Mar 2013
In reply to Miranda:
> (In reply to sarahlizzy)
> Agreed there is a lot to do in Cortina.

There is indeed, but if you're not used to ferratas, a lot of it is quite stiff! Having said that, nothing overly challenging for those used to technical climbing.
dsh - on 12 Mar 2013
In reply to Ed Saint:

We had a good time sprinting down through the maze of tunnels on the Hexenstein to catch the last bus back to Cortina.
Erstwhile on 12 Mar 2013
In reply to sarahlizzy:
> (In reply to Ed Saint)

> Realistically, if you're doing it by bus, you're probably best sticking to the valley you're based in.

Yes, there is a sort of tradition that in the Dolomites you need to move around. Nowadays (probably never) that is hardly true, with enough to keep you busy for a month or more at any of the main climbing bases.
If I was you I would "exploit" the fact of not having a car and travel between huts doing things as you go. You could probaly find a place to stash a tent and spare kit as a reserve in case you decide to come down and camp. (You could leave it at my house, just for example, near Arco). The nice thing is you can combine some big traverses with routes and ferratas, finishing wherever you fancy without having to go back and recover the car.

James Rushforth - on 12 Mar 2013
In reply to sarahlizzy:
> (In reply to Ed Saint)
>
> It can be done, but it will eat into your days significantly. Based in Cortina, you'll struggle to do much in Val Badia, Val Gardena and especially the Val Di Fassa. It's complicated by the watersheds being the boundaries between the Veneto (Cortina, Val Fodom), Sudtirol (Badia, Gardena) and Trentino (Fassa). There's not fantastic interconnect between them.
>
> Realistically, if you're doing it by bus, you're probably best sticking to the valley you're based in. There is a lot to do in Cortina though, especially if you're there for the ferratas.

Spot on post. Have fun and enjoy your trip!


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