/ Gritstone climbing shoes

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itsonlyRick - on 14 Mar 2013
At the moment im using Sportiva Pythons and I dont know what it is, maybe its because its my first pair of slipper type shoe. But I just dont trust them on grit. They just dont give me that confidence I have in them at the gym. So im looking for some shoes that give me that on grit, price range around 80 to around 100.

Looking to move away from the Sportiva brand because its as all I buy. Cheers.
Jon Stewart - on 14 Mar 2013
In reply to Rick Randall:

Just depends what fits your feet. Well fitting shoes are far better than ones with stickier rubber or whatever. Try some on.
The Ex-Engineer - on 14 Mar 2013
In reply to Rick Randall: For general gritstone climbing below English Tech 6a, the answer would be whatever fits your feet well, is comfortable and not massively expensive.

I've found out over the years that whenever I've thought I was struggling because of issues with shoes, the real problem has always been that I lacked technique and just wasn't a good enough climber.
GrahamD - on 14 Mar 2013
In reply to Rick Randall:

Not sure how much outside climbing you have done, but feet always feel less secure on rock than on the wall with well defined foot holds. Basically fit is everything so what is best for you depends on your foot shape. You shouldn't need to get anything too aggressive (down turned toe) for grit.
turtlespit - on 14 Mar 2013
In reply to Rick Randall: assuming they fit your feet, I find the Anasazi VCS a good grit shoe.
neil the weak - on 14 Mar 2013
In reply to Rick Randall: While the VCS would be a sensible choice (flat, sensitive etc), they are quite a different shape to the Pythons. Making the wild assumption that your Pythons fit you really well, then I'd suggest trying Miura Lace Ups as they're flatter and quite a similar fit if perhaps a little stiff when brand new, or maybe the 5.10 Verde (narrower than the velcro version).
Kemics - on 14 Mar 2013
In reply to Rick Randall:

I personally find the Anasazi's a great grit shoe as they have enough of an edge for anything small but still smear well (which is more likely!)

I've always found it strange to see people using super aggressive down turned bouldering shoes for grit severe classics. Like cutting pizza with a sword :)
Hannes on 14 Mar 2013
In reply to Rick Randall: Anasazis are great for your typical grit route with a fair amount of smearing. If there are actual holds or pebbles I would rather take a pair of Scarpa Vapour lace, they edge better than anasazis and smear nearly as well not to mention that they seem to last about three times as long
Styx - on 14 Mar 2013
Either Anasazi's or Miura laces, whichever fit your feet best, sorted!

You don't need an aggressive downturned shoe at the grade you're climbing on grit, most foot holds consist of smears, a bit of edging or smedging (smeary edges!). Downturned shoes are designed for grabbing small holds with the tips of the toe and getting power through it on overhanging terrain. Your average grit route involves smears and a bit of edging, that means a moderately stiff, flat shoe that allows you to get as much rubber in contact with the rock as possible.
WILLS - on 14 Mar 2013
In reply to Rick Randall: 5:10 verde.
kingofthering on 15 Mar 2013
In reply to Rick Randall:
Pythons are great shoes for smearing. I wouldnŽt buy any new shoes.
They are not as downturned as some might think.
since they are soft they smear great and also edge a little better on any postive holds than anasazis in my opinion.
The only thing anasazis do noticeable better are pockets, but from all iŽve seen of grit pics n videos pockets are not a common thing on gritstone.
IŽd say (like someone mentioned before) you need to get used to the not so stuctured Outdoor-Holds and your footwork and the trust in your shoes will come with the time.
Mr Fuller on 15 Mar 2013
I climb grit in Anasazi VCSs and think they're incredible on slabs and thin stuff but aren't great for jamming as my feet hurt. What I really mean is, am I just a wuss who needs to man up on the foot jamming (ironically I'm half decent at the hand jams), or are stiffer shoes going to help?
kingofthering on 15 Mar 2013
In reply to Mr Fuller:
I think it depends more on how much your toes are curled in the shoe not on stiffness.

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