/ Pain in Elbow

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climber007 - on 17 Mar 2013
Hello,

I get a pain in my elbow when bouldering. It's a sharp pain which although fairly transient, it does prevent me from climbing as it is quite painful.

Having a look around, I assume that it's tendonitis. Is there anything preventative that I can do?

Thanks.
highclimber - on 17 Mar 2013
In reply to climber007:
> Hello,
>
> I get a pain in my elbow when bouldering. Is there anything preventative that I can do?
>
> Thanks.

Stop climbing?
ERU - on 17 Mar 2013
In reply to highclimber:
> (In reply to climber007)
> [...]
>
> Stop climbing?


Or have a look at this:
http://www.facebook.com/groups/WinterClimbsinSouthWales/585869764761238/
neilwiltshire on 17 Mar 2013
In reply to climber007: Tendon problems pretty much just have to be rested for a long time. Can easily recur and get worse if you don't rest it for long enough. That said, if it only hurts when climbing and not when doing other less strenuous things, its probably not too bad.
turtlespit - on 17 Mar 2013
In reply to climber007: check out these two options:

http://www.ukclimbing.com/articles/page.php?id=3614
http://tomrandallclimbing.wordpress.com/2012/11/23/golfers-elbow-a-possible-solution/

Also look at Dave MacLeod's coaching blog for tips on managing injuries.

You'll probably need some sort of rest, but it's up to you to figure out what your body needs. You might be able to focus on slabs or balancy vertical routes dialling back the difficulty whilst your elbow recovers.
JTM - on 17 Mar 2013
In reply to climber007:

- Good rest- may need at least 6 weeks solid rest.

- Ice (wrapped in cloth) on affected area can help with pain/swelling.

- Physiotherapy

- Pain killers

Hope this helps!
JTM - on 17 Mar 2013
In reply to JTM: That treatment is for tendonitis (my previous comment)!
Pompey - on 18 Mar 2013
In reply to climber007:
Hi, you don't say exactly where the pain is in your elbow, but if it's on the outside where you can feel a bony lump that the tendons originate from then it's likely to be 'tennis elbow', if its on the inside then probably 'golfer's elbow'. Through climbing you could be prone to either, this is worth a read: http://www.nicros.com/training/articles/treating-climbers-elbow/

There are other causes of elbow pain such as bursitis or tunnel syndrome, in which case if the advice given in this article and by the folk above doesn't work then it's worth heading to the doc for a physio referral. It may be that you have a specific area of muscle weakness that needs addressing. You can get elbow supports that may help things when climbing, but tbh it's better to find and treat the original cause rather than to try and mask it. Ditto the advice from others re resting it until it's better (i've got to say sensible things like that because i'm a physio, but i freely admit to never taking my own advice and to spending two years running on a dodgy knee whilst munching brufen, thus ensuring that I now have near-constant knee pain whilst on the hill - clever girl!). good luck getting it sorted :)
bpmclimb - on 24 Mar 2013
In reply to climber007:
> Hello,

Is there anything preventative that I can do?
>

My advice would be to consult a physio who knows about climbing and climbers

Robi - on 28 Mar 2013
In reply to climber007: Hi ,My 12 years practicing experience with Tui Na (chinese medical massage)you do not do that move what made you hurt ,have planty of warm up before climbing ,very good to put lot of sesame oil on the effected area and massage it in ,take oil every morning to fill up your body with (like 1 tablespoon)seasame oil.Massage the painfull area every day and your arm ,you go where it is hurt .yes give rest also but do not need totally rest ,better moving so you keep up your circulation in your arm ..,
and you have to see your self as healed already .Happy climbing Cheers Robert
gingerwolf - on 30 Mar 2013
In reply to climber007: check out:

http://thomasbondphysio.blogspot.com/2013/02/medial-and-lateral-epicondylitis.html

for more info if it is a tendonitis problem

And, as always, without a proper diagnosis, seek professional help!

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