/ Recommend me a book

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PebblePusher - on 25 Mar 2013
Morning all,

I am looking for inspiration for my next book. I'm not a fan of fiction and have read pretty much nothing but expedition books and climbers autobiographies for the last year and a bit. Fancy reading something a bit different but am short of ideas (something about the history of the British empire maybe?).

Any and all ideas welcomed!!
Thanks
Chris
Tall Clare - on 25 Mar 2013
In reply to PebblePusher:

Have you read A Voyage for Madmen by Peter Nicholls? The story of the 1968 round the world yacht race. It had me gripped and I still feel a little queasy when I see a certain shape of racing yacht.
Kemics - on 25 Mar 2013
In reply to PebblePusher:

I'd really recommend Helter Skelter. It's written by the attorney who prosecuted the Charles Manson case. Really gripping read and very well written. Probably the most absorbing non-fiction book i've read
PebblePusher - on 25 Mar 2013
In reply to both:

Well, that's why I asked UKC! I never in a million years would have thought of those but have read a couple of reviews and they sound really interesting.

Not sure if I'll go for the boating one just yet, I read (shocking confession here) the Bear Grylls book on crossed the Atlantic in an open RIB boat. Must say I thought it would be a struggle to maintain interest when all they have to descibe is a 360 degree view of water but he managed it and I thought it was a good read.

The Charles Manson book sounds fascinating.

Any more suggestions??

Cheers
Chris
Tall Clare - on 25 Mar 2013
In reply to PebblePusher:

We Wish To Inform You That Tomorrow We Will Be Killed With Our Families by Philip Gourevitch - it's about the Rwandan genocide and it's a brilliant book. As you'd expect, it's not particularly light reading, but it's definitely worth it.

Waterlog by Roger Deakin - a swimming journey round and within Britain.
gd303uk - on 25 Mar 2013
In reply to PebblePusher: Achebe, things fall apart.
Kemics - on 25 Mar 2013
In reply to PebblePusher:

I really cant recommend it enough. Not at all the sort of book I'd normally go for, but I picked it up and literally couldn't put it down. The sort of book i'd sneak off on my lunch break to try and read a few more pages.

Also could go for Homage to Catalonia by George Orwell. It's a kind of autobiographical account of serving in the Spanish civil war. Gives are really unique insight into the war and into Orwell's life.
LaMentalist on 25 Mar 2013
In reply to PebblePusher:

I thought The Wettest County in the World by Matt Bondurant was good it covers the trial of The Great Franklin County Moonshine Conspiracy of the 1920's . Its not for the squeamish but it is well written & views it from two different perspectives so you get a good idea of what actually went on.

Nick Cave helped to adapt the story for it to become the film Lawless . He scored the soundtrack too which helped give it an authentic atmosphere I thought .
Tim Chappell - on 25 Mar 2013
In reply to PebblePusher:


A Short Walk in the Hindu Kush by Eric Newby.

A Time of Gifts by Patrick Leigh Fermor.

Into the Silence by Wade Davis.
Ramblin dave - on 25 Mar 2013
In reply to PebblePusher: #
Just My Type - A Book About Fonts by Simon Garfield. Very readable book about a surprisingly interesting topic. Will literally change the way you look at the modern world...
Toby S - on 25 Mar 2013
In reply to PebblePusher:

I know you said you're not keen on fiction but give 'The Martian' by Andy Weir a try. It's only 77p for the Kindle at the moment and I'd highly recommend it.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/The-Martian-ebook/dp/B009IEXKXI
Kelcat - on 25 Mar 2013
In reply to PebblePusher:
A short history of nearly everything - if school texts had been written like this we'd all be a little bit smarter.
Trawler - a war correspondent spends two weeks on a deep sea trawler, sounds odd but was a fascinating insight into a truly weird world.
Depending on your age/location; Pies & Prejudice. & Cider with Roadies. The former is an excellent love letter to the concept of The North (with the bonus of why the South has no soul) the latter is a must for anyone who was an adolescent music fan in the 80's & 90's.
Tall Clare - on 25 Mar 2013
In reply to Ramblin dave:

I *loved* that! Good call!
PebblePusher - on 25 Mar 2013
In reply to PebblePusher:

Thank you for all the ideas everyone, I have a nice list of books to go check out in Waterstones after work now.

Cheers
Chris
PebblePusher - on 28 Mar 2013
In reply to Kemics:
> (In reply to PebblePusher)
>
> I'd really recommend Helter Skelter.

Hey Kemics, just to let you know thanks to you I am exhausted today! I bought Helter Skelter on Monday night and have not been able to put it down, have been reading past midnight every night this week. Thank god it's a short week as I might have fallen asleep at my desk after another night of little sleep.

So far it is one of the most gripping books I have read, information overload because of all the detail in it!

Thanks for a great suggestion.
Chris

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