/ Getting people psyched to start winter climbing!!!

This topic has been archived, and won't accept reply postings.
David86 - on 31 Mar 2013
I know this may be a bit of a delicate issue but as a beginner to Scottish winter climbing I have found it hard to get psyched to start climbing. I know a lot of beginners like myself try to get information on the does and dont's of it all from the internet as it is an extremely accessible source of information however when you start to trawl through all the forums you cant help but notice that 99% of the comments are negative and condescending. I just wanted to try and get people to remember what it is like as a beginner and that we should be trying to get these people stoked to get off of their sofas rather than attempting to smash their ambitions. It would be amazing if you could positive information off of these forums as I imagine there is a lot that could be learned.
mysterion on 31 Mar 2013
In reply to David86:

I think it is because winter climbing is like that. I only do grade I/II stuff but feel pretty intimidated approaching the start of the route. Getting out the door is just an earlier test of willing.
ice.solo - on 31 Mar 2013
In reply to David86:

I agree with you, but consider it a test: if you can navigate the negative bullshit you are a step along the way in what is an uncomfortable sport.
Wee Davie - on 31 Mar 2013
In reply to David86:

>as a beginner to Scottish winter climbing I have found it hard to get psyched to start climbing

I've been climbing for about 20yrs and I've never struggled with the psyche aspect of it. I'm excited by the possibility of good conditions and good climbing (regardless of the grade).
Top tip- don't worry about the armchair pundits- if you like it you'll keep liking it.
So what if you see a bit of flaming on t'net? Do you know these people- no.
Neil Pratt - on 31 Mar 2013
In reply to David86:

There's lots of good info online that will help along the way, but winter climbing is definitely one of those areas of life where's there's no substitute for learning 'on the job'. In some respects, getting from the bottom to the top of a particular bit is the easiest part of the day - judging what is an appropriate round given the weather and snow conditions now and over the past weeks, having good navigation skills and the confidence to use them, even learning how to manage yourself and your kit to keep everything safe and warm are all important as well.

I think just about everyone who's out and about on the hills in winter has had the opportunity to learn from their own screw ups, but the ideal situation is to get yourself in tow with one or two more experienced folks who can help you develop the knowledge and understanding in as safe an environment as possible. You may already have done this, but getting involved with organisations like the Scouts, Cadets or similar might be worthwhile, as they tend to have well-developed programmes for introducing people to the hills in summer and winter.

I'm 50 now, so hopefully I still have a good few years left in the hills yet, but if I have any regrets about the last 30-odd years of hillwalking and climbing, it's about the stuff I didn't do, rather than the things I have. If you have dreams and ambitions, then pursue them, however daft they seem to other people.You might not achieve everything you want to, but nothing guarantees failure more than never getting off your arse to try anything at all.
Dave Perry - on 31 Mar 2013
In reply to David86:

David

When I started climbing, you found a partner, who hopefully was a bit more experienced than yourself. (There was no internet). You didn;t need 'stoking'. All you wanted was a partner!!

If folkj are glued to their sofas, no amount of internet encouragement is going to change it.
The Ex-Engineer - on 31 Mar 2013
In reply to David86: There is a massively good reason most climbers don't evangelise about Winter climbing and openly encourage novices, especially those your age.

It would be morally reprehensible and flat wrong if we did.

It is dangerous, easily more dangerous than anything most UK citizens, outside of our soldiers serving in Afghanistan, will do in the course of their day to day life.

If you want to go climbing, go climbing.

However, don't expect others to actively encourage you to undertake an activity that would very possibly double or triple the chances of you dying next year.
deanstonmassif on 01 Apr 2013
In reply to David86:
> I know a lot of beginners like myself try to get information on the does and dont's of it all from the internet as it is an extremely accessible source of information

There's your problem.

There used to be things called books and friends, or at least trusted acquaintances. I believe they still exist, but you have to go out to find them. They will help provide some of the knowledge and confidence you seek, but ultimately climbing is a journey of exploration for the individual - the curiosity and motivation must come from within.

Now get off the internet and go outside; I don't want to see you until teatime. ;-)

Nick

Jamie B - on 01 Apr 2013
In reply to David86:

I'm with the Ex-Engineer; winter climbing is great and if you ask me about it I'm going to be enthusiastic. But equally I'm going to counsel caution if that seems appropriate. It's possible to be motivated and yet careful at the same time.

This topic has been archived, and won't accept reply postings.