/ Navigation technology

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Bolderben - on 01 Apr 2013
Hi there,

GPS navigation technology is the topic for my dissertation. If you go into the mountains for recreation or on a professional basis, please take a few moments to complete this survey.

All CONSTRUCTIVE comments are welcomed!

Thanks for your time,

http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/WHJ9J7W
RJP - on 01 Apr 2013
In reply to Bolderben: I completed your survey and it looked like a reasonable one. I'm personally not a massive fan of GPS or Smart Phones in the outdoors, but I do see their benefits as an aid to traditional nav.
Ridge - on 01 Apr 2013
In reply to RJP:

Also filled it in.

I don't have a problem with smartphones etc, provided people are aware of the limitations. The survey seemed to be constructed to elicit a "maps good, electronics bad" or "electronics good, maps bad" response.

Stupid people are the greatest risk, regardless of the technology used.
butteredfrog - on 01 Apr 2013
In reply to Bolderben:

Completed

Congratulations on a legible survey by the way.
Horse on 01 Apr 2013
In reply to Bolderben:

Done, I think the distinction between GPS and Phone is a bit false. My phone has a GPS built in and comes with OS maps.
highclimber - on 01 Apr 2013
In reply to Bolderben: Done.
blurty - on 01 Apr 2013
In reply to Bolderben:

An unusually cogent survey, well done.
Wainers44 - on 01 Apr 2013
In reply to Bolderben: done. Good survey!
Jim C - on 01 Apr 2013
In reply to Horse:
> (In reply to Bolderben)
>
> Done, I think the distinction between GPS and Phone is a bit false. My phone has a GPS built in and comes with OS maps.

Agreed, many GPS systems also have a full OS capability, so the map reading skill is still required when using a mapping GPS or a plain old map, both have advantages and disadvantages.
I have also completed the survey, and made the point there. I'm all for good map skills, but I have been out with 'map only ' types enough times, to know that they are fallible in difficult conditions , and therefore a backup is worthwhile. If they would just leave their ego at home and put a cheap GPS in their sack they have nothing to lose.

Smartphones I have found are still very unreliable, battery life and cold make them less useful, but every option is better than none if you are in a difficult situation.
NeilMac - on 01 Apr 2013
In reply to Bolderben:
RJP on - 18:22 Mon
In reply to Bolderben: I completed your survey and it looked like a reasonable one. I'm personally not a massive fan of GPS or Smart Phones in the outdoors, but I do see their benefits as an aid to traditional nav.


^^^my sentiments to a word!

Will you be publishing your findings here?
Ridge - on 02 Apr 2013
In reply to NeilMac:

My take is that no single type of navigation is 'bad', they all have weaknesses and limitations. Provided you're aware of those limitations then it's all good.

Take smartphones. Fragile, vulnerable to wet, touchscreens don't like water, quite slow on initial fix and very heavy battery drain. That said I have a waterproof case for mine, and for a 4/5 hour walk running a mapping app that displays your position is a lot less hassle than gettting the map out if it's windy and raining. The map and compass are always there as a back up.

If it's a longer trip then the phones switched off and stored safely away and it's back to map and compass. If for whatever reason you've lost position and have zero visibility then the ability to get a 6 figure grid by briefly switching on the phones GPS is invaluable.

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