/ Your Second cannot follow a Traverse?

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SCrossley on 12 Apr 2013
Did a 20m Traverse the other day and there was no issue and if there had I could have reversed the route and walked off. But what if it was an inescapable multipitch and your second cannot follow you on a traverse, what do you do?
AlanLittle - on 12 Apr 2013
In reply to sjc:

Show them, preferably in advance, how to set up a backrope. (You are climbing on double ropes, right?)

Reverse the traverse and ab off? But wait, "inescapable" you said? Really inescapable no matter how much gear it might cost you? It's still more sociable to await rescue together than at opposite ends of the traverse.

You made sure they know how to prusik, right? How poorly protected is this traverse? They can fall off, prusik up to the gear, repeat as required ... unlikely to be either fast or much fun for them, granted.

Rethink your choice of route or partner next time?
nbonnett - on 12 Apr 2013
In reply to sjc:

quickest way is just pull him off and use the ''opps, i slipped , sorry''excuse.

It works a treat every-time , especially if your bored waiting.
SCrossley on 12 Apr 2013
In reply to nbonnett:
LOL, sounds less faffing.
SCrossley on 12 Apr 2013
In reply to AlanLittle:
Yes double ropes, they can prussik and I am thinking the Dolomites and sudden case of severely gripped.
Ramblin dave - on 12 Apr 2013
In reply to sjc:
Making it up as I go along here, but could they make themself safe on a sling, tie their ends of the rope together and clip them into the belay, have you take in both ropes until they're tight (and maybe tie them off) and then dangle across on prussics, collecting gear as they go? When they get there you can pull through the ropes from your end and only have to sacrifice the belay gear.

Would work better on a route with bolted belays which are bombproof in all directions and where you're attached with a sling rather the ropes are part of the belay.

There might be something wrong with that, though, and I'd hate to have to explain it to a second at the other end of the pitch. TBH I think the "pull them off idea" is probably easier and might be safer.
EeeByGum - on 12 Apr 2013
In reply to nbonnett:
> (In reply to sjc)
>
> quickest way is just pull him off and use the ''opps, i slipped , sorry''excuse.

Agreed. That was going through my head too. I think there is some difference between can't and won't.
Turdus torquatus on 12 Apr 2013
In reply to nbonnett:
> (In reply to sjc)
>
> quickest way is just pull him off

I suppose that might take his mind off things for a while, and bring you closer to each other maybe.
AlanLittle - on 12 Apr 2013
In reply to sjc:

Why on earth would you go on a route, in the Dolomites of all places, where you're not confident in your partner's ability to do it? The different route/different partner option would seem to be the obvious choice.

(It's not the Big Micheluzzi is it? I'm having trouble finding a victim for that)
AlanLittle - on 12 Apr 2013
In reply to Ramblin dave:
> Would work better on a route with bolted belays which are bombproof in all directions

He's in the Dolomites, so confidence-inspiring belays are pretty much ruled out.

Otoh so is having to ab into the sea, which would score pretty highly for "inescapable"
Offwidth - on 12 Apr 2013
In reply to sjc:

Back-rope them across then get them to belay you back to retrieve the gear. Knowledge and practice of prussics (or similar) are a must because if they fall they may need them to get back to you.
GrahamD - on 12 Apr 2013
In reply to sjc:

Hindsight is a beautiful thing - reflect carefully on your poor choice of route and/or second.
wilkie14c - on 12 Apr 2013
In reply to AlanLittle: I'd tend to agree but remember the OP is only suggesting this senario. Traverses are just as bold for the second as it is for the leader so just cause you can drag your mate up a VS doesn't mean he'll be fine on a VS traverse. Some thought is needed of route choice and if at all possible you can work the ropes so your second has a rope from above the whole time. This really is the beauty of double ropes. Valkirie at the Roaches is a good example, the leader can climb the second pitch on one rope so the other rope can be free to be above the second when they make the scarey down traverse.
nbonnett - on 12 Apr 2013
In reply to Turdus torquatus:
Yeh I pondered that one as I typed it but get if it works for them so what -:)!!!
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rocky57 - on 12 Apr 2013
In reply to sjc:

Interesting comments there. I've never been "pulled off" on a route, but I can always live in hope.

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