/ nikwax rope proof

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taffyboy - on 13 Apr 2013
can anyone help please. as i am on a tight budget i bought two half ropes, brand new for 75 pounds each. reading the description, these ropes are not dry treated, i have only just found that there is a product by nikwax for dry treating your ropes, can anyone recomend this product if they themselves have used this.thanks
cyberpunk - on 13 Apr 2013
In reply to taffyboy: This product is not as good as buying a pre-dry treated rope. What I have done in the past is I only dry treat my rope for winter climbing. I find no point in dry treating it for summer rock climbing. I usually treat the rope as in December and again end of Feb start of Mar. Hope this helps.
Baron Weasel - on 13 Apr 2013
In reply to taffyboy: More effective with a little gentle heat to activate the repellancy i.e put over the back of a chair near a radiator.

BW
taffyboy - on 13 Apr 2013
In reply to taffyboy: cheers guys, most appreciated.
David Barratt - on 13 Apr 2013
In reply to taffyboy: I wonder if nikwax is the best option? I am aware for waterproofing jackets, Nikwax applies to where there is already some DWR on the material, where as grangers applies to the entire material. This is why it's best not to use Grangers for garments like Vaporise. but maybe that makes it better for things like untreated ropes? anyone else any thoughts?
taffyboy - on 13 Apr 2013
In reply to David Barratt: cheers mate for the input. ive never heared of grangers and dont even know where to look to purchase it. any ideas.
David Barratt - on 13 Apr 2013
In reply to taffyboy: Certainly sold widely in Scotland. You'll find it in Tiso and cotswold. Not sure how widely it's available elsewhere but definitely online from the above.
taffyboy - on 13 Apr 2013
In reply to David Barratt: cheers mate, will look into it.
Baron Weasel - on 13 Apr 2013
In reply to David Barratt: They are all very similar - just different packages for all the waterproofing agents. The stuff for boots is the same stuff just with tanins added to keep the leather supple. Had a great chat with a guy from nikwax a few years ago and basically the concentration varies as does the instructions.

A little heat is the key!

BW
David Barratt - on 13 Apr 2013
In reply to Baron Weasel: Similar but different.
Nic DW - on 13 Apr 2013
In reply to taffyboy:

As a voice of paranoia (and a chemist) i'd stick to a product that is designed for ropes. There may well be chemicals in some of these things which could damage the nylon.
David Barratt - on 13 Apr 2013
In reply to Baron Weasel: Also, it was my understanding that nikwax did not require heat activation. I think this maybe used to be be case but no more. it's a myth that has stuck.
taffyboy - on 14 Apr 2013
In reply to Nic DW: cheers mate, i think i will go for the nikwax as it says its for all ropes. cheers
Baron Weasel - on 14 Apr 2013
In reply to David Barratt: Heat is the key - the guy from Nikwax told me when I asked him about it a year or so back. Try it and see - you can often breath new life into a waterproof without re-proofing. Useful when you don't have chance to re-proof if you are in a youth hostel or whatever.

BW
David Barratt - on 14 Apr 2013
In reply to Baron Weasel: Strange, A nikwax rep in Scotland told me the opposite. he said they had changed the way it's made so that heat activation was no longer needed. I wonder if it is the case that while heat activation is not needed, it still improves the performance...

and I'd agree, if you found one that is designed for ropes... go with that.
Baron Weasel - on 14 Apr 2013
In reply to David Barratt: 'Rope Proof' - I used to use it for slackline to repel dirt and and keep tension more even when damp...

BW
thegoatstroker - on 14 Apr 2013
In reply to David Barratt: I recommend "Rep-proof".
One application and BS simply runs off!

ads.ukclimbing.com
ciaran1999 - on 14 Apr 2013
In reply to David Barratt:

Baron Weasel, when the Nikwax rep told you that he was referring (by mistake or on purpose) to reproofing coats and other garments which have an original DWR. Using heat on these garments reactivates any of the original DWR still present. Nikwax DOES NOT require any heat to activate it, however grangers products do. So in short you can only use grangers on garments which can be heated in a tumble dryer or over radiator, where nikwax is suitable for any garment or product even including jeans etc.

Have used rope proof in the past and would agree that it is nowhere near as good as buying a dry treated rope, but its use does have some merit.

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