/ Inspitationa and rabbal rousing classical music

This topic has been archived, and won't accept reply postings.
The Lemming - on 18 Apr 2013
Inspirational and rabble rousing classical music.

I quite like classical music but beyond listening to the adverts I'm a bit thick and ignorant of such things. To help me in my quest to discover long lost classics to a modern lemming, what's out there that will get my creative urges going?

I've just discovered what Nimrod is and who done it. :-)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kgcwdpu09VQ
Blue Straggler - on 18 Apr 2013
In reply to The Lemming:

Polovtsian Dances - Borodin
Pursued by a bear - on 18 Apr 2013
In reply to The Lemming: Ride of the Valkeries, Mars from the Planet Suite, Montagues and Capulets from prokofiev's Romeo and Juliet. You'll know them all...

T.
Pursued by a bear - on 18 Apr 2013
In reply to The Lemming: And of course, O Fortuna from Orff's Carmina Burana.

T.
Pursued by a bear - on 18 Apr 2013
In reply to The Lemming: Here are some links for you:

O Fortuna http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GD3VsesSBsw

Ride of the Valkeries (you can also watch Apocalypse Now if you like) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V92OBNsQgxU

Mars http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L0bcRCCg01I

Montagues and Capulets http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-LSxpxjMQ9c

T.
Quiddity - on 18 Apr 2013
In reply to The Lemming:

William Walton is good for cheesy edwardian style rabble rousing.

Crown Imperial
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7WMrQe87gRk

Spitfire prelude & fugue
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GVSm_f7bO8s

Enjoy.
tony on 18 Apr 2013
In reply to The Lemming:

Beethoven's Ninth, and in particular, the Ode to Joy. You'll know it when you hear it, and if you don't, you're in for a treat.
Tall Clare - on 18 Apr 2013
In reply to The Lemming:

Beethoven's 9th, 4th movement, Schiller's 'Ode to Joy': http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t4N5-OALObk

Beaker from the Muppets offering his interpretation: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VnT7pT6zCcA
Tall Clare - on 18 Apr 2013
In reply to tony:

Snap!
Quiddity - on 18 Apr 2013
In reply to The Lemming:

Sibelius - Finlandia
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fgwr3wrenkQ

Tchaikovsky - Romeo & Juliet fantasy overture
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cxj8vSS2ELU
also - look up the 1812 for pyrotechnics, cannons etc.

If you want something more adventurous, Shostakovich - symphony number 5
bit spicy, also a bit of a curveball if you are looking for straightforward rabble rousing, it is very bittersweet, it helps to know some of the history. One of the best bits of music ever composed. The 3rd movement (21:19) is painfully beautiful and has been used in films everywhere. The 4th movement is rabble-rousing soviet style.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kTqsU7tQW48
Blue Straggler - on 18 Apr 2013
In reply to The Lemming:

Handel - Zadok the Priest. You might recognise it from ringtones :-)
spearing05 - on 18 Apr 2013
In reply to The Lemming: Tchaikovsky's piano concerto no 1 - All of it. Most people will recognise the opening chords and the final needs to be played with the volumn up.
spearing05 - on 18 Apr 2013
In reply to spearing05: Or even finale
pneame on 18 Apr 2013
In reply to The Lemming:
Could try some modern stuff -
Michael Torke has some great music.
I was listening to this on the way to work:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hIpMI1-Ck5k
pneame on 18 Apr 2013
In reply to pneame:
And that led me to this-
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zLckHHc25ww
Metaphorically
Ramblin dave - on 18 Apr 2013
In reply to Quiddity:

> If you want something more adventurous, Shostakovich - symphony number 5
> bit spicy, also a bit of a curveball if you are looking for straightforward rabble rousing, it is very bittersweet, it helps to know some of the history. One of the best bits of music ever composed. The 3rd movement (21:19) is painfully beautiful and has been used in films everywhere. The 4th movement is rabble-rousing soviet style.
> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kTqsU7tQW48

Ooh, good call!
pneame on 18 Apr 2013
In reply to spearing05:
> (In reply to The Lemming) Tchaikovsky's piano concerto no 1 - All of it. Most people will recognise the opening chords and the final needs to be played with the volumn up.

Totally agree - played this non stop Liverpool -> Aviemore and back, 8-track, Escort van.
Still waving our arms to the music as we headed back into town on the M62

No Eagles or Doobie Brothers on that trip (our usual fare at the time)
Tony Naylor on 18 Apr 2013
In reply to The Lemming:
Brahms, Ein Deutsches Requiem:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dJelOS-fjrY

Pero - on 18 Apr 2013
In reply to The Lemming:

You could also try:

Stravinsky's "Rite of Spring", which genuinely caused a riot at its premiere.

Aran Khatchachurian's ubiquitous Sabre Dance.

Richard Strauss's "Also Sprach Zarathustra"

Richard Strauss's Violin Sonata, which is more subtly rousing.

And Korngold's violin concerto, although perhaps that's more Rabbi rousing, then rabble rousing!
Hat Dude on 18 Apr 2013
In reply to The Lemming:

Rossini's William Tell Overture

Evidently you're an intellectual if you can listen to it without thinking of The Lone Ranger
ads.ukclimbing.com
Blue Straggler - on 18 Apr 2013
In reply to Hat Dude:

Ooh and Rossini's The Thieving Magpie of course!
Hat Dude on 18 Apr 2013
In reply to Blue Straggler:

You must be an intellectual; you thought of "A Clockwork Orange"
Blue Straggler - on 18 Apr 2013
In reply to Hat Dude:

Actually I as thinking of Zbigniew Rybzynski's art film "The Orchestra" :-)

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0373210/
Gordon Stainforth - on 18 Apr 2013
In reply to The Lemming:

I've always found Bach's Wachet Auf ('Sleepers Awake'), first movement, incredibly powerful and rousing. The power is in the energy of the music, which builds and builds ... like the all the greatest classical music the power relies on inner strength and dynamism rather than volume. Here's a good performance taken at the required breakneck pace:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lz0FmmNrTck
Tom V - on 18 Apr 2013
In reply to Gordon Stainforth:
Nearly 8 hours into the post and no mention of opera yet, so-

Nearly all of Bizet's Carmen.
Large chunks of Puccini - La Boheme, Madam Butterfly and especially Tosca, but grab a hanky.
Some very rousing Verdi- get them Hebrew Slaves at it.
Postmanpat on 18 Apr 2013
In reply to Tom V:
> (In reply to Gordon Stainforth)
> Nearly 8 hours into the post and no mention of opera yet, so-
>
> Nearly all of Bizet's Carmen.
> Large chunks of Puccini - La Boheme, Madam Butterfly and especially Tosca, but grab a hanky.
> Some very rousing Verdi- get them Hebrew Slaves at it.
>
I'll second that but what about Handel? If the Messiah isn't inspirational and rabble rousing then I'm a commie!

The Lemming - on 18 Apr 2013
In reply to Tom V:
> (In reply to Gordon Stainforth)
> Nearly 8 hours into the post and no mention of opera yet, so-
>

Not a fan of opera and high pitched screaming women don't do it for me. I have only been to one opera which was a contempoary effort of Carmen with the NBT. How many operas do you see with a bar room setting and Arsnel playing footy on a large screen TV.

Most impressive it was too.

Deviant - on 19 Apr 2013
In reply to The Lemming:

Karl Jenkins has composed some powerful stuff. A particular favorite is 'Hymn Before Action', from 'The Armed Man. The lyrics are taken from a poem written by Rudyard Kipling :-


The earth is full of anger,
The seas are dark with wrath,
The Nations in their harness
Go up against our path:
Ere yet we loose the legions --
Ere yet we draw the blade,
Jehovah of the Thunders,
Lord God of Battles, aid!

High lust and froward bearing,
Proud heart, rebellious brow --
Deaf ear and soul uncaring,
We seek Thy mercy now!
The sinner that forswore Thee,
The fool that passed Thee by,
Our times are known before Thee --
Lord, grant us strength to die!


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f1U-LVDSnAM


Steph-in-the-West on 21 Apr 2013
In reply to The Lemming:
4th Movement of Dvorak's Symphony Number 9 - From the New World. Unbelievable mix of themes and crescendos - the whole work is utterly brilliant - but this movement always brings me to a standstill.....
For something a bit more subtle - Allegri's Misere and Morricone's "Gabriel's Oboe" played on the oboe. The arrangements for other solo instruments just don't work....

This topic has been archived, and won't accept reply postings.