/ Living in a Shed

This topic has been archived, and won't accept reply postings.
Don'tTellHim Pike - on 27 Apr 2013
Does anyone here live in a shed?
Kelcat - on 27 Apr 2013
In reply to GrumpySod: nope, but I do spend a lot of time in it as its my office. Next project is to put a wood burning stove in.
There are people down the lane from us who live in a converted shipping container, there power is wind & solar.
Don'tTellHim Pike - on 27 Apr 2013
In reply to Kelcat: Thanks. Reeson i ask is that I have no famly and want to spent all my money on things like walking and travel. I dont want to be tied to or have the expense of a house and wondered if a farmer might let me put a shed on his land to live in.
Neil Williams - on 27 Apr 2013
In reply to GrumpySod:

Don't think that is legal...

Neil
Don'tTellHim Pike - on 27 Apr 2013
In reply to Neil Williams:
> (In reply to GrumpySod)
>
> Don't think that is legal...
>
> Neil
What - living in a shed or putting it on someones land?

Kelcat - on 27 Apr 2013
In reply to GrumpySod: I'm not an expert, but there was a farmer near here (Lakes) who put unauthorised (by the planners) statics on his land & they repeatedly sued him till he was bankrupt & the people in the statics were evicted.
the power - on 27 Apr 2013
In reply to GrumpySod: campervan in a layby
tlm - on 27 Apr 2013
In reply to GrumpySod:

http://www.express.co.uk/news/uk/273088/Banned-the-couple-who-live-in-a-shed-while-they-save-for-a-h...

This lot didn't like it because of the lack of running water.

Why not live in a small caravan instead? It must be as cheap as a shed second hand?
galpinos - on 27 Apr 2013
paul-1970 - on 27 Apr 2013
In reply to GrumpySod:

Interesting philosophical and human rights issue this. What does one do if one does not want to live in the state?

You could build a log cabin or make an arrangement around a shed, but you're still on someone's land. You could live in a cave, but you're on someone's land. You could live in a tree. But the tree is on 'someone's land'!

So how does one secede 'membership' or state control from the land on which one is born? Surely, as a living human being brought into this world without regard to my volition, one can ultimately live wherever one pleases...?
Neil Williams - on 27 Apr 2013
In reply to GrumpySod:

Using a shed as a permanent residential building. It doesn't meet building regs for that purpose.

Neil
Jimbo W on 27 Apr 2013
In reply to GrumpySod:

> Does anyone here live in a shed?

I wouldn't advise it.. ..the garden will be viewed as an extra bedroom and you'll be taxed accordingly!
Niall - on 27 Apr 2013
In reply to paul-1970:
> (In reply to GrumpySod)
>
> Interesting philosophical and human rights issue this. What does one do if one does not want to live in the state?
>
> You could build a log cabin or make an arrangement around a shed, but you're still on someone's land. You could live in a cave, but you're on someone's land. You could live in a tree. But the tree is on 'someone's land'!
>
> So how does one secede 'membership' or state control from the land on which one is born? Surely, as a living human being brought into this world without regard to my volition, one can ultimately live wherever one pleases...?

Have you tried Sealand?

Or changing your name to 'Paul-of-the-family-1970, freeman on the land'?

:-)
woolsack - on 27 Apr 2013
In reply to paul-1970:
> (In reply to GrumpySod)
>
> Interesting philosophical and human rights issue this. What does one do if one does not want to live in the state?
>

You get a Transit tipper and a great big caravan with lots of chrome and tarmac drives
andymac - on 27 Apr 2013
In reply to GrumpySod:

What about a house boat/ canal boat ?

Or a boat?

ARRR

Richard Baynes - on 27 Apr 2013
In reply to woolsack: How can you have a caravan with tarmac drives... ooghnnn have I misunderstood?
Jim C - on 27 Apr 2013
In reply to GrumpySod: the only other person I came across that did anything similar took seasonal jobs that were part paid in lodgings,and gave him money to save up funds for hs next 6 months or so traveling.
Alii - on 27 Apr 2013
In reply to GrumpySod:

Google 'Carbeth Huts'

Cheers, Ali
paul-1970 - on 27 Apr 2013
In reply to Niall:

You see? It's an essential question that is true but few think through the reasoning. It matters not what your opinions or wishes are, it's an existential question.

Sealand is offshore, by the way. I'm talking onland.
paul-1970 - on 27 Apr 2013
In reply to woolsack:

Is that a yawnsome dig at what you perceive as the travelling communities? If so you're missing out on the central discussion.
marsbar - on 27 Apr 2013
In reply to GrumpySod: I reckon a caravan is probably your easiest bet. Or if you consider living in another country where the planning regulations are less hassle or less enforced. Rural France might be a good bet. I am sure that there are other places.
Skip - on 27 Apr 2013
In reply to marsbar:
> (In reply to GrumpySod) I reckon a caravan is probably your easiest bet.

I've been living in a caravan for years. Previously have lived in vans, buses, static caravans, and under canvas. I have friends who live in narrow boats, sheds, log cabins, caravans, vans and horse drawn wagons. It's possible: some caravan sites will allow all year round living (although usually illegally), some sympathetic landowners will allow temporary dwellings. It is legal to occupy a caravan on private land as long as you use the bathroom and kitchen of the house on that land. It is also possible to get planning permission to occupy a temporary dwelling on your own land, this seems to be at the discretion of the local council. I have friends in this situation. Currently the best locations for sympathetic councils seem to be Somerset, Gloustershire, and South West Wales. The planning laws were relaxed in S.W. Wales recently.
Bob_the_Builder - on 27 Apr 2013
In reply to marsbar:

What happens if........... the council doesn't know you are there?
Skip - on 27 Apr 2013
In reply to Bob_the_Builder:
> (In reply to marsbar)
>
> What happens if........... the council doesn't know you are there?

Bingo! Result
Bob_the_Builder - on 27 Apr 2013
In reply to Skip:

Are you the council, just caught a tax dodging scum? Oh dear. I knew I shouldn't have said anything! =P (I am actually a tax dodging scum, but as a student so its all above board)

The case in the article linked is a great example. The idea that you cannae live in the shed because it doesn't have running water is ridiculous. But nae bother, I "live in the house" and "only use the shed for camping and storing my clothes." Or something similarly ludicrous but nigh impossible to disprove. It may be the principle of the thing for those living in the shed I suppose.
Tom Last - on 27 Apr 2013
In reply to Skip:

Hey Mike, how you doing?

Likewise my sister's fella lives on a caravan on a farmer's land, has done for years.

Funnily enough, he's looking to buy a house at the moment and apparently one of his requirements is that the garden is big enough to put his caravan in it!

Seems home is where the hardstanding is, after all ;)
Kevin Woods - on 27 Apr 2013
In reply to Alii: While climbing at Craigmore regularly, I often talked to a woman who seemed to live permanently. She told that a requirement for the Carbeth Huts was to have a main house already and this was what she was doing.
Jimbo W on 27 Apr 2013
In reply to GrumpySod:

Why is this thread title putting Bon Jovi in my head...

...arghhhhhhhh
MJ - on 27 Apr 2013
In reply to Jimbo W:

Why is this thread title putting Bon Jovi in my head...

Because you're a closet Bon Jovi fan?
ice.solo - on 27 Apr 2013
In reply to GrumpySod:

a friend lives out of a lock up. he works from there but legally cant reside there, so he sleeps in his van.
ads.ukclimbing.com
stroppygob - on 27 Apr 2013
In reply to GrumpySod:

Doesn't all this depend on how you intend to pay your way while living in a shed/caravan/campervan/cardboard box?
Jimbo W on 27 Apr 2013
In reply to MJ:

> Why is this thread title putting Bon Jovi in my head...
>
> Because you're a closet Bon Jovi fan?

gets a feeling like when I pull apart cotton wool... ...nooooooooo
Trangia - on 28 Apr 2013
In reply to andymac:

Moorings are usually charged for. You will have to have the toilet pumped out regularly and there will be the costs of electricity and water hook ups.

La Shamster on 28 Apr 2013
In reply to galpinos:
> (In reply to GrumpySod)
>
> Like this?
>
> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q4U7isvtCHA

Thanks for posting that link what a delightful video. I then proceeded to watch loads more on the same theme!

La Sham
Richard Baynes - on 28 Apr 2013
A couple of people have mentioned the Carbeth Huts near Glasgow. They are legally speaking holiday homes. Even so they have had a long fight to get ownership and lots of hassle over about 90 years. I do know however of two guys who do in reality live there with a slim pretence of staying at their mum's place. With a sympathetic land owner it seems possible. I would hope anyone establishing a life like this would be prepared to nake a voluntary contribution to the council for the services they do use...
IainRUK - on 28 Apr 2013
In reply to Neil Williams: I know two friends who live in a shed in a wood..
Blue Straggler - on 28 Apr 2013
In reply to GrumpySod:

If you don't "want" the expense of a house, then you are choosing to be homeless.

If you live in a shed in a field, where is your water supply? Will you live without electricity? Where will you light fires? Will you have a proper job and a bank account? Have you thought this through at all? Are you trolling?

http://www.birminghammail.co.uk/news/local-news/pictures-sunday-mercury-reveals-the-story-225929
galpinos - on 28 Apr 2013
In reply to La Shamster:

My pleasure, it's a little more light hearted than this debate!
TryfAndy on 28 Apr 2013
In reply to Blue Straggler:

Rank amateurs, we had the ultimate in "f*ck you, I'm living here" gents http://bit.ly/127Z6iN
Plus I don't see how they can tell the difference between tramp & normal in Halesowen...

As for living in a shed, I don't see why you couldn't. Where's the difference between a shed & a cabin? Is there a set size? And as for planning permission, stick it somewhere nobody will notice or care, and hope no self-righteous prick snitches on you for the following 7yrs.
La Shamster on 28 Apr 2013
In reply to galpinos:

Lol that's the UKC way - I was totally inspired by it and then all the other videos I linked to on the same subject afterwards. Before I knew it 2 hours had gone by.
New POD - on 29 Apr 2013
In reply to GrumpySod:

My cousin used to live in his parents shed during university holidays. He was allowed in the house though. My aunt and uncle had moved house (350 miles) and they couldn't afford for all thier kids to have a bed room each, so they insulated the shed.

His sister married a bloke called 'Tent Man Sam' who lived in a tent in Scotland, and they spent 18 months living in a Yert.
EeeByGum - on 29 Apr 2013
In reply to GrumpySod: You could always live in a container

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-sussex-22306838
almost sane - on 29 Apr 2013
In reply to GrumpySod:

Why have a "house" at all?

Reduce the volume of your possessions.
Put them in storage.
Travel.
When you return to the UK, rent a flat or a static caravan for a time. Or pitch a tent in a campsite. Or something. Live there until it is time to go away.

Sell everything.
Travel.
When you want to come back to the UK, treat it as another destination. Live in hostels / bothies, camp, rent someplace...
Alan M - on 29 Apr 2013
In reply to GrumpySod:

If it was me I would go for a converted van. The shed idea is littered with problems i.e. water source, heating, location, planning laws, waste disposal, nimbys etc etc etc.

The van gives you what you want but is mobile you could wake up in a new place every day etc. you can use showers at service stations, gyms etc

Wish you luck
New POD - on 29 Apr 2013
In reply to GrumpySod:

I work Freelance and so far in 4 years the closest from home that I've had any paid work is 70 miles, so I need somewhere cheap monday to friday.

I have toyed with the idea of buying a camper van and just staying in the car park at the client, but this would be viewed as "unprofessional".

I've priced up buying a caravan and staying on a campsite, but it's cheaper to rent a room in someone's house.

I've also thought about a canal boat, but it's not in the same ball park.

If I could find someone, that had spare space on their drive for a caravan that would work, but how ?

This topic has been archived, and won't accept reply postings.