/ NEWS: Lama and Arnold Climb Major New Route in Alaska

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UKC News - on 02 May 2013
David Lama leading thin ice on Bird of Prey, 4 kbAlpinists David Lama and Dani Arnold have established a new route on the formidable Moose's Tooth in Alaska. Their new route—Bird of Prey—takes a striking path through the previously unclimbed headwall on the Tooth's east face.

"It's a logical line," Arnold told Rock and Ice. "We tried to climb the direct and easiest line to the top, but it was hard enough!"

Read more at http://www.ukclimbing.com/news/item.php?id=68029

Morgan Woods - on 02 May 2013
In reply to UKC News:

wow...as Rodney Dangerfield might say....the kid's all right.
d508934 - on 02 May 2013
In reply to UKC News:

amazing effort. such good style as well, rocking up, seeing it and doing it. no idea about Alaskan grades - what would this get in french alpine grades?
Mr Lopez - on 02 May 2013
In reply to d508934:

Dur Putain+
Epsilon - on 02 May 2013
In reply to d508934:
> (In reply to UKC News)
>
> amazing effort. such good style as well, rocking up, seeing it and doing it. no idea about Alaskan grades - what would this get in french alpine grades?

Alaska grade VI climbs would mostly (all?) be in the ED-EX range. For a point of reference, the most famous hard Alaskan climb, the Cassin Ridge, is a Grade V. Routes like the Slovak Direct, Infinite Spur, Moonlight Buttress etc. are Grade VI.
johncoxmysteriously - on 02 May 2013
In reply to UKC News:

What does '90 degrees' mean as a grade?

jcm
AJM - on 02 May 2013
In reply to johncoxmysteriously:

Ice angle I think?
johncoxmysteriously - on 02 May 2013
In reply to AJM:

IS that a normal grade? It doesn't seem very useful. Or is all 90 degree ice the same difficulty as all other 90 degree ice? I wouldn't have thought so.

jcm
Kemics - on 02 May 2013
In reply to UKC News:

jeez, can't imagine that was a very comfy bivvy on that face.
Michael Gordon - on 02 May 2013
In reply to johncoxmysteriously:

Yes you'd have thought saying WI5/6 would have been more useful?
henwardian - on 02 May 2013
In reply to UKC News: I thought the whole point of putting up a mixed-rock-ice-aid-solo-free route was you get to give it about a dozen different grades including a few from a new system that exists only in your own head and then snicker at everyone else who spends ages trying to figure out just how hard your climb is/is not in comparison to all the existing lines.
If I was skillful and fearless enough to put up a line like this, I certainly wouldn't miss the opportunity :D
TRip - on 03 May 2013
In reply to Epsilon:
> (In reply to d508934)
> [...]
>
> the Cassin Ridge, is a Grade V. Routes like the Slovak Direct, Infinite Spur, Moonlight Buttress etc. are Grade VI.

I think there is a world of difference in doing the Slovak and the Moonflower, even if you go to the top of Hunter. To my mind the Slovak is a much, much bigger tick.

Giving overall grades to these sort of routes is fairly nonsensical.

To JCM: 90 degree ice means vertical ice. It makes sense to me as a grade.

HTH

Ramon Marin - on 03 May 2013
In reply to UKC News:

Top effort by Lama/Arnold, really happy to see the chap's got it right at the end as he's grown up. It's really inspiring to see someone that basically was an indoor comp climber to make it into the big mountains
Damo on 03 May 2013
In reply to Ramon Marin:
> (In reply to UKC News)
>
> ... really happy to see the chap's got it right at the end as he's grown up. It's really inspiring to see someone that basically was an indoor comp climber to make it into the big mountains

He climbed a new route on Cerro Kishtwar last year, a peak that was a pretty big deal for British alpinists 20 years ago.

Amid lots of utter crap being talked at the Piolets d'Or in Courmayeur last month, he gave a very humble and honest account of his climb of Cerro Torre and summed up the bolting episode with "I didn't know what I was doing." Pity some of the journalists present lacked that clarity.
Michael Gordon - on 03 May 2013
In reply to TRip:
> (In reply to Epsilon)
> [...]
>
> 90 degree ice means vertical ice. It makes sense to me as a grade.
>
>

hmmm, I'd have thought the type of ice, thickness etc will be fairly important!


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