/ Scotland Snow Conditions

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Arbu - on 03 May 2013
Heading for Scotland this coming Monday, I'll be thinking of climbing some Munros the following week (beginning 13th May). Should I take ice axe and crampons do you think?
Jim C - on 03 May 2013
In reply to Arbu:
> Heading for Scotland this coming Monday, I'll be thinking of climbing some Munros the following week (beginning 13th May). Should I take ice axe and crampons do you think?

Depends which Munros.?
Ben Lomond , no, Cairngorms and Glencoe very probably.
Jim C - on 03 May 2013
Dave Perry - on 03 May 2013
In reply to Arbu:
a) You take them with you to scotland.
b) Check the weather temp for the day of your walk when in Scotland.
c) if it is below 7c or so then you might want to take them onto the hill
d) If it is above that temperature you probably won't need them as the snow will be above freezing and likely to be soft.
Arbu - on 03 May 2013
Thanks, that seems clear. In answer to Jim C, I'm thinking Ben Lawers and Schiehallion but maybe the Cairngorms. Just checked the SAIS avalanche report and I see the risk is still considerable in places - clearly I'll need to check that as well nearer the time.
steelbru - on 03 May 2013
In reply to Arbu:
Loads of webcams and daily mountain guide reports these days, so no excuse to not know what the conditions are if you're prepared to do a little homework.

Definitely need crampons and axe in certain areas this weekend
Flinticus - on 03 May 2013
In reply to Arbu: By 13 May, who knows. A week is a long time in politics but even longer in conditions in Scotland. Now, yes and snow goggles ( its summer don't you know?).
Toby S - on 03 May 2013
In reply to Arbu:

It's snowing and settling right now in Inverness. Bastard bloody weather.
OMR - on 06 May 2013
In reply to Arbu: Just for the record, on Saturday the snow was over a metre deep on the McDui plateau (view indicator an inch above the snow level) and a complete white-out with no points of reference between the summit and the Lochan Uaine cornice - just the faint line in the white where the edge was. Combine that with the gale force winds and falling snow and I reckoned it was easily full winter conditions there.
Ron Walker - on 06 May 2013
In reply to Dave Perry:
> (In reply to Arbu)
> a) You take them with you to scotland.
> b) Check the weather temp for the day of your walk when in Scotland.
> c) if it is below 7c or so then you might want to take them onto the hill
> d) If it is above that temperature you probably won't need them as the snow will be above freezing and likely to be soft.

Unfortunately Dave that's not quite correct as it is often much icier once the softer surface snow has melted off exposing the harder icy surface and the still frozen ground underneath. At 9 C the tops and shaded areas will still be icy on the higher Scottish mountains. This particularly applies to the north facing and the steeper slopes and ridges which will likely still be icy early morning and evening...
Dave Perry - on 06 May 2013
In reply to Ron Walker:

You're right of course but I simply 'pulled' 7c out of my head.

With an adjustment for the temp in 'c) of my post the principle/practice is much the same Ron. You may aswell take them as not and decide on the day.
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Flinticus - on 07 May 2013
In reply to Arbu:
The hills back of Newtonmore and south of Dalwhinnie either side of the A9 were largely free of snow though with extensive patches on sheltered slopes (I was at Newtonmore yesterday and travelled back on the train south via Perth). Much less than I expected.

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