/ Aiguille Rucksacks

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Strachan on 10 May 2013
Hi,

At some point in the relatively near future I am going to be in the market for a new bag to replace my shredded do-everything Osprey. I am looking for something fairly simple, and I keep reading good things on here about Aiguille bags. I have had a look on their site and they look pretty old fashioned, esp. with respect to materials etc and I was just wondering what it is that makes them so popular?

Cheers!
Simon Rackley - on 10 May 2013
In reply to Strachan: there bomb proof mate.
TRip - on 10 May 2013
In reply to Strachan:
> Hi,
>
have had a look on their site and they look pretty old fashioned, esp. with respect to materials etc and I was just wondering what it is that makes them so popular?
>
They are pretty old fashioned, but that is no bad thing in my opinion. Rucksack design has taken a step backwards over the last few years, with many bags being over featured and poorly constructed. Look at OMM bags for example. The bags are made from super lightweight materials but are still quite heavy, because they have far too many features, dreamed up by designers who rarely climb anything other than the stairs.

The Aiguille bags use simple designs with no superfluous seams and features. They're made of hard wearing materials that mean they last forever. And they are made to order so are customizable, to an extent.

If you are interested I am selling on of their Stratos bags. I tried to email you but your profile won't accept emails.

HTH

nniff - on 10 May 2013
In reply to Strachan:

It's simple really - no frills, tough as old boots and lightweight. If you want fancy mesh and foam and useless 'features' that you'll never use, go somewhere else.

Aiguille Zephyr for me
gcandlin - on 10 May 2013
they look pretty old fashioned, esp. with respect to materials etc


The materials are not old fashioned at all, its the same stuff that bouldering mat covers are made of, boomproof, its just all the big manufacturers have got it in their heads that we all want super light rucksacs when in reality what 90% of us want its super durable rucksacs.
Scott_vzr on 10 May 2013
Agree with +ve statements above, very high quality hardwearing kit. There Canoe kit is excellent too.
Timmd on 10 May 2013
In reply to gcandlin:
> they look pretty old fashioned, esp. with respect to materials etc
>
>
> The materials are not old fashioned at all, its the same stuff that bouldering mat covers are made of, boomproof, its just all the big manufacturers have got it in their heads that we all want super light rucksacs when in reality what 90% of us want its super durable rucksacs.

That's exactly what i'm after, my beloved Berghaus rucksack I got in 1995 as a teenager is finally seeming like it needs replacing.
OwenM - on 10 May 2013
In reply to gcandlin:
> they look pretty old fashioned, esp. with respect to materials etc
>
>
> The materials are not old fashioned at all, its the same stuff that bouldering mat covers are made of, boomproof, its just all the big manufacturers have got it in their heads that we all want super light rucksacs when in reality what 90% of us want its super durable rucksacs.

You might want a super durable rucksac but manufacturers don't want to make you one. If they did it would last far to long and you wouldn't need to buy another. Then they'd go out of business. It's called planned obsolescence.
Mr Fuller on 10 May 2013
In reply to Strachan: My Aiguille bag was called 'old-looking' a couple of weekends ago. I don't mind considering at 33 l it weighs 800 g; is made of seriously tough fabric; comfortable carries loads of 15 kg; will pack anything from hiking kit, to cragging kit, to Scottish winter kit, to alpine bivvy kit; is reasonably priced; is free of features I'd cut off otherwise; is UK-made; is supporting cottage-industry; is made by people who use their own kit. When you see guides and instructors with Aiguille bags that are ten years old, faded, but otherwise as new, you get the feeling they're probably worth it.
HB1 - on 10 May 2013
In reply to Mr Fuller: I've just recently been looking at these bags. My Pod 30L is almost 20 years old now, excellent and robust, but it's never been quite big enough. Am I right in thinking that the Aiguille bags are very similar, and thus very good value?
Mr Fuller on 10 May 2013
In reply to HB1: Yes, I'd say so. The Black Ice and the original Pod sacks are fairly similar to the Aiguille bags. The new Pod sacks are very different.
Hat Dude on 10 May 2013
In reply to Strachan:
Posted in earlier thread

http://www.ukclimbing.com/forums/t.php?t=534762&v=1#x7177232

"Had a Zenith for approx a year; good sack, very well made, comfortable and lighter than it looks.

My only complaint is that the closing straps are stitched quite high up so that if you're climbing with it fairly empty, it's difficult to strap the lid down tight. I get around this by threading the straps down through the axe attachment loops."
Strachan on 11 May 2013
In reply to Strachan:
Thanks for all the info, they sound pretty indestructible!
TRip, thanks for the offer but I'm not buying right away (student). And at some point when I have worked out how, I will sort my profile out!
My other question about the bags is how comfortable are they? Obviously they don't have the really fancy back systems you see on alot of other bags, but I can't see any pictures on the website showing what they do have?
Cheers
a lakeland climber on 11 May 2013
In reply to Strachan:

If you are in the Lakes you can pop in to their workshop/showroom in Staveley, it's near Wilf's cafe. If you've got a special need then they'll build that in to the sack for you.

ALC
nniff - on 11 May 2013
In reply to Strachan:

Mine's got a plain back which is curved the same as my back, a single aluminium stave inside to keep it that way, some shoulder straps and a padded waist belt that folds back through the ice axe loops for climbing. No mesh, no big foam pads, no pointless straps on the waist belt, no gear loops, no little D-rings. It's got a chest strap too. That's got buckles - no sliding things, no magnetic hose holder to screw your compass up. No stretchy bits to perish or tear

Nothing but the essentials in a simple, functional and tough form, which is exactly what I want.

There's nothing to show on a web site pic.
timbers - on 11 May 2013
In reply to Strachan:

Got two of their packs. The 33ltr one and a 50(ish)ltr one. They've both been used for dragging around my climbing hardwear over the last 7/8 years, plus Scottish winter trips, small backpacking trips and everything else inbetween. Even used the larger one stuffed with weights as a "body" when training for SPA, hauling/dragging it up and down gritstone crags,(try that with a trendy, super duper lightweight pack). They're both still going strong. Absolutely solid, comfy, lightweight, basic packs that do a job. Plus you can choose what colour you want when you order it, (over the phone from the bloke that actually makes them)!!

And they're made in the UK by craftsmen, not in China by 10 year old boys - what's not to like?!?!?
Siward on 12 May 2013
In reply to Strachan: I think the harness system varies depending on the size and intended use. My sack ( a Triolet) has a light and simple padded back, no stiffening or strengthening in it at all, and a light but padded hip belt ). The Expedition type sacks have a more sophisticated hip belt, aluminium bars etc simply because they are designed with heavier loads in mind. I'm perfectly happy with the simple system for most stuff.
Andes - on 12 May 2013
In reply to Strachan:
Here's yet another positive endorsement.... their sacks are simple, bombproof and comfortable, I'm a professional user.
John Biggar
Timmd on 12 May 2013
In reply to Andes: I think I might have to get the train upto Stavely or put my mind seriously towards learning to drive. They look very like my old Berghaus rucksack from 1995, simple and made from the same robust 1000D material.

Considering I've used it for scrambling and climbing, and winter hill walking and for college, and for walking and for cycling trips, it's done pretty well to last nearly 20 years. The material is as tough as old boots.

A cycling crash scuffed the shoulder straps, and the waist belt and rucksack pocket are torn, think it'd be uneconomical to have it repaired. I'll stop lamenting the loss of my rucksack. (:-))

BaggieBoy on 13 May 2013
In reply to TRip: hi how much do you want for the stratos? Can you send a photo. Thanks
David Coley - on 13 May 2013
In reply to Strachan: My 90 litre one is still going after 20+ years and will be going to the base of el cap once more packed with 30kg of water and a pile of ropes in a few weeks.
heathermeek - on 25 May 2013
In reply to Strachan: Hi, Our rucksacks are not the most fashionable looking however, they last forever!! If you pop into our shop you can have a rucksack fitting and customise the sack to suit you. :-)
richparry - on 25 May 2013
In reply to heathermeek:

I bought an aiguille stratos a few years ago to replace my original Sheffield made pod sac which was stolen by some thieving scumbag.

The quality is second to none and built to last.
Strachan on 25 May 2013
In reply to heathermeek:
I think I've been persuaded. Will probably pop in next time I'm in tha lakes!

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