/ 100-mile walk

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Chay - on 13 May 2013
Hi All,

Stupidly got myself into a 100-mile in 48hrs walking challenge. Anyone done 100-miles?

I've done quite a few long walks and know all the tricks to get through it but wondering how you felt at 100miles?

C
mrchewy - on 13 May 2013
In reply to Chay: There's a few on here who've ran that in a day, I'm sure someone will be along soon. I've done 69 miles in one hit and the last 10 were horrific.
Run_Ross_Run - on 13 May 2013
In reply to Chay:
All in one or you having a kip at some stage.
SCrossley on 13 May 2013
In reply to Chay: My mate did all the Scottish tops over 4000` in 48 hours, in Winter, and I think he said that was over 100 miles, he felt tired at the end.
Stanners - on 13 May 2013
In reply to Chay:
I've cycled 100 in one go, and that was very hard..so walking it... good luck ;) but what the mind can conceive and believe, it can achieve !
Chay - on 13 May 2013
In reply to Stanners: I've cycled 100miles in one go too and you're right, that was taxing! Walkig 100miles will be very difficult, physically and mentally no doubt.
TheDrunkenBakers - on 13 May 2013
In reply to Chay: try a couple of these in in one go as training

.http://www.lykewake.org/route.php
earlsdonwhu - on 13 May 2013
In reply to Chay: Only done 70 odd. Jogged some of first 15 which were on road/tracks though later we had boggy paths and ploughed fields. Good footwear, well taped feet and regular eating/drinking are key. The body will hurt ...different bits at different times. Friends who have done lots of ultras say the ability to turn the brain off is key. 5 minute naps seemed to help!
Chay - on 13 May 2013
In reply to TheDrunkenBakers: The walk is this weekend so any additional training isn't an option..I've done a few of that length before, however.
Wainers44 - on 13 May 2013
In reply to Chay:
> Hi All,
>
> Stupidly got myself into a 100-mile in 48hrs walking challenge. Anyone done 100-miles?
>
> I've done quite a few long walks and know all the tricks to get through it but wondering how you felt at 100miles?
>
> C

Me too, LDWA 100 in 2 weeks. Seemed a good idea when I signed up! Have done about 55miles in a day over moorland a couple of years back. Felt pretty good and my ipod battery just lasted...

All the sources of info I have seen seems to agree on not going too fast to start and making sure to keep eating and drinking loads throughout.

What time are you aiming for??
Chay - on 13 May 2013
In reply to earlsdonwhu: Yeah! I can imagine it's as much a mental strain as physical! Thanks for the tips, had to put much of that into practice in other walks- like you say, comfy fit is a must!

C
Chay - on 13 May 2013
In reply to Wainers44: Considering that I was talked into it on a whim and haven't had any chance for specific training I'd just be happy with anything under 48hrs!

If I can get close to 45hrs that'd be amazing, yourself?

C
Wainers44 - on 13 May 2013
In reply to Chay: I dont know really. My training went really well until march, then the wheels (achilles) came off, so I peaked too early...not the first time ;)

I would like to think that inside 35hours will be possible, mainly as I really dont fancy walking through the second night.

I did the 55 over far worse terrain unsupported and on my own in 14hrs and felt ok...but I dont feel as fit as I did.

Is it the LDWA that you are doing?
martinph78 on 13 May 2013
In reply to Chay: Take a few pairs of spare socks and an walkman. Enjoy!
Chay - on 13 May 2013
In reply to Wainers44: Not the LDWA, simply an event a friend of mine thought up in the pub and drew up as a plan: 100(102 actually) miles of coastal terrain so relatively flat though some ups and downs with a target of 48hrs...

I think less is possible; doubt I could get it down to 35hrs though I really don't know. Just gotta give it a bash eh?!

C
Chay - on 13 May 2013
In reply to Martin1978: I'm thinking an MP3 or two might be a good idea, to keep sane mainly!

C
Wonrek - on 13 May 2013
In reply to Chay: I ran 64 miles on Saturday. Sleep deprivation is a bizarre and indescribable feeling......

My advice is to do anything that makes you happy. I took a cut down prefilled toothbrush and brushed my teeth on the move around mile 50,

The psychological boost you can get fom simple things can be the difference to success or failure.
Wainers44 - on 13 May 2013
In reply to Chay: too right, it will be fun....I expect...

People have said to me that the checkpoints help but I worry that restarting might be tough? I only stopped walking 3 times in 14 hours the last time and I found it much easier to just keep going.

Have you got to carry food or kit along with you?

Chay - on 13 May 2013
In reply to Wainers44: Yea, I think short breaks now and again- if you stop for any length of time I think the temptation might be to stop all together/sieze up a bit.

Got to carry kit and food yes, keeping it minimal/light (energy bars and the like) though.

I'd say it's possible to get close to 40hrs; it's just how my body reacts in the last twenty miles, we'll see. It'll be a good experience I think; it's the things you don't do that you regret, afterall!

C
Wainers44 - on 14 May 2013
In reply to Chay: luckily it sounds like LDWA provide plenty of food so I dont have to carry too much. Have some kit to carry but it looks like that should be pretty light.

Looking forward to it now!
The New NickB - on 14 May 2013
In reply to Wainers44:

LWDA is famous for its food. I have only run a few of the short (20+ mile) events, but they had food at every checkpoint, a barn or marquee full of cake and sandwiches at half way and lots of hot food at the end. Running I couldn't enjoy much of it until the end.
Irk the Purist - on 14 May 2013
In reply to Chay:

I did the Lakeland 100 last July which took me 32 hours. There are large parts of that which I simply cannot remember doing. I couldn't point at the paths on a map. Sleep will be your greatest undoing.

Apart from that, as you would expect, my legs hurt like billio (but you get used to it), my shoulders ached and I ate most of the UK's supply of ibuprofen because my feet started ballooning for some reason. I don't think there are words to describe how tired I was in places but you get through it.

I found it easy to eat and drink, easier than 8-9 hour events where you're pushing a bit harder. Keeping warm in the second night was a challenge as my body was so exhausted by then so take more layers than you otherwise might. Prepare yourself to mentally suffer and embrace it as an old friend.

Good luck, it's a fine acheivement. I'm still living off of it.


Al Evans on 14 May 2013
In reply to Eric the Red: Long distance walks were big in the 1880's. 100 miles was a sprint, they used to have 6 day races (rest on the Sabbath) I think the current world record holder is a Sheffield Lad called George Littlewood who did 623.75 miles on an indoor track at Madison Square Gardens in 1888. There is a very good book called Ultra-Marathoning The Next Challenge by Tom Osler and Ed Dodd, which covers all long distance challenges and training for all distances.
GrahamD - on 14 May 2013
In reply to Chay:

A couple of pairs of fresh socks are worth their weight in gold, apparently. Good luck !
Irk the Purist - on 14 May 2013
In reply to Al Evans:

Yes Al, I know. And they ate rocks for dinner and gravel for tea, if they were lucky. Yadayadaydadada...

:o)

martinph78 on 14 May 2013
In reply to Al Evans:
> they used to have 6 day races (rest on the Sabbath)

Couldn't do that these days. They'd have missed the X factor.
GrahamD - on 14 May 2013
In reply to Al Evans:
> I think the current world record holder is a Sheffield Lad called George Littlewood who did 623.75 miles on an indoor track at Madison Square Gardens in 1888.

Some people can't have any boredom threshold at all !
Al Evans on 14 May 2013
In reply to Eric the Red:
> (In reply to Al Evans)
>
> Yes Al, I know. And they ate rocks for dinner and gravel for tea, if they were lucky. Yadayadaydadada...
>
> :o)

Its absolutely true, and they whipped themselves with nettles also true, I think there were intakes of strychnine involved as well :-)
jack_44 - on 14 May 2013
In reply to Chay: Great thread, would be good to hear how you got on. Take my hat off to anyone for undertaking a challenge like that!
Moley on 14 May 2013
In reply to Chay: The most important bit, is the 6 inches between your ears. Have that working and disciplined and you'll be ok.
Go your own comfortable speed, don't be dragged along too fast or slow by others.

Regular food and drink, discipline yourself to take in regular nutrition, say every 30 minutes on the watch (or whatever), sip your water as you go along - depending on weather etc.

If something is starting to go wrong, blisters, sores, stop and sort it immediately - don't wait.

Try to go round under 40 hours, going into the second night without sleep is the hard one.

It isn't as hard as you think, so don't think about the miles, just do them.



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Nick Harvey - on 14 May 2013
In reply to Chay: I managed 127.5 miles of a 145 mile 'race' last June. There is an account of it on my blog (see profile) along with some lessons learnt. One lesson, for anyone sane, would be just don't!
Dim Dringo - on 14 May 2013
In reply to Chay: Did the Housman 100 LDWA walk two years ago. Took me 41 hours. Spent too long in check points and suffered last 9 miles with seized muscles in leg, bag of frozen peas on it helped a bit!

Good luck, is a great experience which i will be doing again. Regularly do 26 milers and try and do at least 1 50 miler each year. Is more of a mental challenge so the more you get used to this sort of event then the easier it gets.

Tim
Moley on 14 May 2013
In reply to Dim Dringo:
> (In reply to Chay) Did the Housman 100 LDWA walk two years ago. Took me 41 hours. Spent too long in check points and suffered last 9 miles with seized muscles in leg, bag of frozen peas on it helped a bit!
>
> Good luck, is a great experience which i will be doing again. Regularly do 26 milers and try and do at least 1 50 miler each year. Is more of a mental challenge so the more you get used to this sort of event then the easier it gets.
>
> Tim

I was sweeper on the Houseman going into the second night over the Elan valleys (from Marteg). Some of them were in a state!


Moley on 14 May 2013
In reply to Chay:
Sorry, wrong 100. Elan Valleys was the Cant Canolbath - only seems like yesterday.
Chay - on 14 May 2013
In reply to Chay: Thanks everyone, seems like providing I can keep my mind in check it should be fine!

C
mrchewy - on 14 May 2013
In reply to Chay: I left the mp3 player off until I really needed it - worked atreat when I turned it on but by the end, it was just annoying. As were lights, socks, people, shorts, food... well everything by the end to be honest.
Wainers44 - on 14 May 2013
In reply to Chay: I feel a bit under prepared as some of the others have been reccying the route for weeks. I have only unfolded the map twice!

What is nice is that the walk starts in Wadebridge and finishes in Teignmouth only about 5 miles from where I live. So its going to feel like walking home!!

Our group is not formally within the LDWA entry as we have been invited to take part due to the rather special story behind the walk , which is called "Camel to Teign Ivor's Dream" google it to find out more!

There are 15 of us doing this alongside the "normal" (?) LDWA members and I know our main aim is to do Ivor's memory proud.
Wainers44 - on 14 May 2013
In reply to Wainers44: Or the link to the story of Ivor...

http://www.ldwa.org.uk/2013Hundred/W/2344/scouts.html
colinkeb - on 14 May 2013
In reply to Chay: I did one a couple of years ago, if its an LDWA one you will be well looked after and supported. find a way of avoiding blisters, apart from your own mind they are the only thing that can really stop you. a gps is useful for the second night as your brain is mashed by that stage and a map and compass or directions become as complicated as brain surgery wearing oven gloves and a blindfold. its an amazing experience and if you keep going you will do it, good luck and enjoy.
Orgsm on 14 May 2013
In reply to Chay:

As a long distance cyclist (253 miles on Sat) here are my tips

Take care of

Hydration
Nutrition
Comfort

Only focus as far as your next stop or control point, do not think about the full distance.

If you drink coffee or high caffeine drinks then abstain in lead up. Before a night stage, drink a can or red bull or equivalent. You will have natural low points, at night join with others if possible.

Carry emergency bonk rations and learn to catnap, even 15-30 mins can do surprising things for revival.
Wainers44 - on 14 May 2013
In reply to Beat me to it!: not heard of the cut out caffine in the lead up but makes sense. How long for, just the preceeding day?
Orgsm on 14 May 2013
In reply to Wainers44:

Longer the better or it won't deliver the pick me up you may need. But any down time from it will help on the day.
Wainers44 - on 14 May 2013
In reply to Beat me to it!: ok, being a big coffee addict for many years going totally without for days before would probably not be a good idea.

What emergency bonk rations did you go for...gels, bars??
Chay - on 14 May 2013
In reply to Chay: I was under the impression that this was this weekend...it's actually the end of next week. Longer to think about it...
Chay - on 14 May 2013
In reply to Beat me to it!: Thanks, the caffeine tip will be noted :)
Chay - on 14 May 2013
In reply to Chay: Some tactics are coming together:

I have an extremely comfy pair of fell running shoes, a size large to fit in two sets of gel insoles.
Multiple pairs of spare soaks and a small tub of powder
Loads of snack items and high energy gels/bars.
Route instructions will be read endlessly before going, especially the night sections.
MP3 ready
No caffeine for a week before.

C
Moley on 15 May 2013
In reply to Chay:
Bear in mind, that at some point (probably after 1/2 way) you probably won't be able to stomach any more gels or sweet food (choccy bars, jelly babies etc), especially if you have already been consuming them for 12+ hours. Don't panic, when you reach the next checkpoint search out savoury foods; crisps, marmite sandwiches - odd things will take your fancy, keep eating and drinking something and have your head prepared that things never go entirely 100% to plan.
Orgsm on 15 May 2013
In reply to Wainers44:
> (In reply to Beat me to it!) ok, being a big coffee addict for many years going totally without for days before would probably not be a good idea.
>
> What emergency bonk rations did you go for...gels, bars??

I'm a jelly babies and nutty bar man when it comes to bonk rations
Wainers44 - on 15 May 2013
In reply to Beat me to it!: jelly babies mmm......
Run_Ross_Run - on 15 May 2013
In reply to Chay:

Bar of kendal mint cake for the last 5km. Rocket fuel.
Wainers44 - on 18 May 2013
In reply to Chay: So only a week to go now. Have finally looked at the map, 100 miles looks scary so I have put the map away again!

I cant decide which type of socks to go for....not white sports type socks, too sweaty, I run in very thin liner type socks. Should I get some thicker wool mix type ones, anybody got any any advice?? I will be wearing my Innovates.
Moley on 18 May 2013
In reply to Wainers44: Wear what you are used to, I wouldn't change now. But take a spare pair or leave some at the breakfast stop (you should be able to have a day-sack taken to this point, put in spare clothing, food, etc.). Don't worry about the route, the route description should be pretty comprehensive, the only time you go wrong is when your brain is shot - or in my case after 3 miles, when my brain was shot!
Good luck, fingers crossed for the weather.
Wainers44 - on 19 May 2013
In reply to Moley: Thanks for that. I will be putting spares in the brecky bag. Weather forecast isnt great, but this far away anything can happen!!
Moley on 19 May 2013
In reply to Chay:
Germolene and vaselene, 2 essentials for your bag.
If it's hot and sweaty and your bum cheeks start rubbing, you will bless the fact you packed these.
I put a small amount into a tiny container or even little plastic bag, usually mix them together. Slap a couple of fingers full up your bum when the going gets sore!
Wainers44 - on 19 May 2013
In reply to Moley:
> (In reply to Chay)
> Germolene and vaselene, 2 essentials for your bag.
> I put a small amount into a tiny container or even little plastic bag, usually mix them together. Slap a couple of fingers full up your bum when the going gets sore!

Is it OK to use someone else's vaseline for this? I promise never to "double dip" of course....
Moley on 27 May 2013
In reply to Chay:
Well, you should be finished now and enjoyed an excellent weekend of weather.
So how did you do? Was it enjoyable? What did you learn and what advice would you pass on to others? Would you do it again - it's S. wales valleys next year?
Hoping it went well, so please let us know!
Wainers44 - on 27 May 2013
In reply to Moley: Yes how was yours Chay??

We finished at 2225 so just under 37hours. Have to say it was far far harder than anything I have tried before. The route seemed pretty hilly, even off the moors (4000m+ of ascent). Weather was stunning....for doing a short walk but boiling for a 100miler, hardly a cloud for 2 days.
We were doing the walk as guests of LDWA, in memory of the late Ivor Kingwell, hence "Camel to Teign Ivors Dream." So from about midnight on Saturday we joined as a team of 6 in true Ten Tors style and walked the rest together.
Advice to others...just dont!!!! No seriously it was a fantastic experience. I expected the soreness, the tired spells in the early hours, the mind shattering feeling at 80 miles that there was still 20 left and those were going to be longer, stiffer, slower, more painful than the first 80...and thats exactly what happened! What nearly caught me out was my bodys ability to switch itself off the moment I sat down. Both evenings as the temperature dropped, to below freezing on the first night, I found it really hard to stay walm and on the first night I had to have a lie down at a checkpoint wrapped in sleeping bag and a foil blanket while speed eating jelly babies to try to rewalm!!

The LDWA Marshalls were just great serving great food and care, best of the lot being the tomato and cheese covered crumpets washed down with a small cup of Dartmoor Ale at Princetown on sunday morning.

Feeling a bit tender today, back of right heel sports a 2inch diameter red purple blister which I will save for bursting later, and I seem to have caught elephantitis in my right...its huge!!

We raised a glass of bubbly to dear Ivor at the finish, a special walk planned by a very special man.
Wainers44 - on 27 May 2013
In reply to Wainers44: oopps thats my huge right knee!!!
Moley on 27 May 2013
In reply to Wainers44:
Well done, it's a great (painfull) experience, couple of days time you'll be thinking about the next one!
It's very interesting how the body copes, both mentally and physically, I found the first 20 miles the worst. After 15 miles I felt like I had a good run out and my brain was saying "But you haven't even started, you'll never manage another 85 miles".

You will now find that you can't stop eating, so burst your blister, take some 'profen for the knee and get yourselves up the pub for some well earned pints and chips.
Congratulations.
Chay - on 27 May 2013
In reply to Chay: Unfortunately our walk was postponed due to two participants having to work through..I didn't fancy it on my own!!

It's a shame but there'll be another opportunity; things I've learnt from this post will come in handy when we do it in August (I'm away in the Alps so can't do it sooner).

C
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Wainers44 - on 27 May 2013
In reply to Moley:
> (In reply to Wainers44)
> Well done, it's a great (painfull) experience, couple of days time you'll be thinking about the next one!
> It's very interesting how the body copes, both mentally and physically, I found the first 20 miles the worst. After 15 miles I felt like I had a good run out and my brain was saying "But you haven't even started, you'll never manage another 85 miles".
>
> You will now find that you can't stop eating, so burst your blister, take some 'profen for the knee and get yourselves up the pub for some well earned pints and chips.
> Congratulations.

Thanks! The beer sounds a good plan, I will drink it then sort the blister!

Its interesting you found the start harder. We walked a bit too fast to start, probably about 8kph and in fact got to cp2 15mins before it opened...stupid mistake!
It didnt seem to really hurt until after 50miles and the general tiredness until after mile 80.

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