/ Did bouldering improve your climbing?

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Microwired22 - on 16 May 2013
Guys,

Wondering if bouldering improved your climbing ability?

I enjoy it, but never really taken it seriously and go probably every could of months. Should it be something I do regularly in an attempt to climb harder?

MW
A Longleat Boulderer - on 16 May 2013
In reply to Microwired22:

Bouldering is an invaluable tool for building up strength for harder moves. So yes... you absolutely should be bouldering if you want to climb harder.

p.s. yes my name on here is referencing bouldering and there is a reason for this... however I am a sport climber.
getandy - on 16 May 2013
In reply to Microwired22: Think it helps get good technique rather than trying to get the beta for a move 4 meters up from a micronut with discoleg going and no reasonable placement in sight. I definately think it helps me and think as a result of bouldering my climbing is much more fluid and dynamic than it would be otherwise.
Jon Stewart - on 16 May 2013
In reply to Microwired22:

Massively.

For trad climbing, where you have to do moves under pressure, you need to have something in reserve (unless you're very talented and can do moves at your limit above your gear, or after getting pumped placing gear).

To get that reserve, you've got to do moves significantly harder than you do on trad. Your options are top-roping, redpointing or bouldering.

For me, bouldering is far and away the least hassle, most fun way to do those hard moves. Bouldering is how I developed the finger strength and technique to climb the trad routes I've most enjoyed.
jkarran - on 16 May 2013
In reply to Microwired22:

> Wondering if bouldering improved your climbing ability?

Probably especially given my preference for short bouldery routes.

> I enjoy it, but never really taken it seriously and go probably every could of months. Should it be something I do regularly in an attempt to climb harder?

Depends what you enjoy and what's holding you back. If you enjoy it, do it. If it's your strength and or technique holding you back (which would be a little unusual given the grades on your profile) then the bouldering will help. You may also find it boosts your confidence which can help. On the downside you can do too much, end up rusty with gear and out of condition for longer pitches.

jk
Jonny2vests - on 16 May 2013
In reply to Microwired22:

I used to boulder a lot at Nottingham Wall, it certainly helped my finger strength and they were good at setting stuff requiring thin footwork, which you don't get so often indoors.

As for outdoor bouldering, I like it, but struggle to prioritise it over routes. When I lived in the UK, Grit bouldering was a no brainer if you wanted to get good at Grit routes, but it doesn't seem to matter so much here on big Granite.
Ramblin dave - on 16 May 2013
In reply to Jonny2vests:
Yeah, as a fairly bumbly climber I found that bouldering outdoors a bit was pretty good for getting less crap at grit, because it tends not to be that sustained at lower grades and bouldering is a good way of doing lots and lots of moves at or near your limit and figuring out what you can actually do on rock and how to do it...
Neil Williams - on 16 May 2013
In reply to getandy:

It is indeed good for trying out particular types of moves etc without the fear. And you can go on your own, which means climbing more = improved skill (unless you have climbing partners on tap).

Neil
Jonny2vests - on 16 May 2013
In reply to Neil Williams:
> (In reply to getandy)
>
> It is indeed good for trying out particular types of moves etc without the fear. And you can go on your own, which means climbing more = improved skill (unless you have climbing partners on tap).
>
> Neil

Dunno, but I seem to get the fear bouldering more often than I do on routes. The ground is just too close :-)
Timmd on 16 May 2013
In reply to Microwired22:

Yes loads, and bouldering indoors can help quite a lot too.
Climbster - on 18 May 2013
In reply to Microwired22:

For me, yes, no question. Bouldering and highballing have enabled me to develop improved finger strength, power/power-endurance, confidence and composure in stressful situations, quicker move/route reading ability etc etc etc.

Having said all that, the value of bouldering largely depends on your own personal goals and ambitions. If you are happiest on easy mountain routes or crag VS then bouldering is not essential, unless you really enjoy it.

However, if you are thinking of improvements, what is it that you want to improve? I find it useful to have specific goals/routes in mind; then working back from there in order to identify what type of climbing/training might be most beneficial/achievable.

If you're not sure, then its just a question of putting in the mileage, in whatever area of climbing most appeals to you, and enjoying the ride until inspiration strikes.
In reply to Jonny2vests:
> (In reply to Neil Williams)
> [...]
>
> Dunno, but I seem to get the fear bouldering more often than I do on routes. The ground is just too close :-)

True!
GridNorth - on 18 May 2013
In reply to Microwired22: No it put me out of action for several weeks. I jumped down off a problem and my foot went into a small hollow, I keeled over and broke my arm.. These days I'm much more relaxed high up with a few runners in. I also thoroughly dislike the jarring feeling when I jump down even onto a mat. Perhaps I'm all tensed up because of the accident but I tend not to boulder nesar my limit.
JIMBO on 18 May 2013
In reply to Microwired22: without bouldering you will never be proper strong!
dr_botnik - on 18 May 2013
In reply to Microwired22: It's all just climbing though. Bouldering will help your climbing in the same way climbing above leader placed protection, or above fixed gear would. At some point you will get high enough above your gear/mat/bolt and have to make the decision to commit.
Milesy - on 18 May 2013
As said. It has helped me with general strength, balance and technique, but doesn't help elvis leg above shite gear with a potential ground fall :)
Andrew Wilson - on 18 May 2013
In reply to Microwired22:
It has helped me, and I am hoping my increased focus on it this spring will soon pay dividends in trad climbing this summer. I have done heaps of lead laps at the wall to get fit but have been pushing the bouldering as far as I can indoors and out to get my tech grade where it needs to be. I have also incorporated some high ball laps that I could not fall off which should hopefully have improved my head game.
Heading for Gogarth on Monday to see if it has all paid off!
Ciderslider - on 18 May 2013
In reply to Microwired22: I've recently found indoor bouldering and have absolutely not doubt that it has vastly improved my strength and technique.
As a result I managed to onsight at the top of my game on my first days trad since last year.

As someone has said it won't help with the feeling you get when you are way above shit gear with a bit of elvis leg going on.
But if your strength and technique are so much better you are more likely to be climbing harder within your limits (and hopefully with a bit less fear)
paul__in_sheffield - on 19 May 2013
In reply to Microwired22: yes and no. Yes it improved core and finger strength and technique and just about everything, and No, because I got so into the directness and lack of faffing about that I gave up roped climbing for some years. Just started mucking about on holiday bolts again, but don't think I'll go back to how it was. Be warned!
NateDangerJones - on 19 May 2013
In reply to Microwired22: i have found bouldering massively useful to improve technique and i have really upped my grade from regular bouldering but i guess the key is just regular climbing,
I also find soloing great to improve my technique, it forces me to climb better
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