/ Sunglasses for use with normal specs

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KlaasW on 28 May 2013
I normally wear glasses and will need sunglasses for use in the alps this summer. Do any of you specs-wearing mountaineers have suggestions for cheapish sunglasses that will fit over normal specs? I could not find anything about this on ukc and it's hard to research using google.
Marek - on 28 May 2013
In reply to KlaasW:
I have a pair of these, with a selection of lenses. Work well for me - mountains and cycling.
http://www.cocoonseyewear.com/sunwear/category.php?id=1
Cam Forrest on 28 May 2013
In reply to KlaasW: Have a look at Eyelevel overglasses - 15-20. Used a lot for angling.
martinph78 on 28 May 2013
In reply to KlaasW: Why not go for prescription sunglasses?

Also don't rule out goggles.
aln - on 28 May 2013
In reply to KlaasW: Sunglasses with prescription lenses?
Solaris - on 28 May 2013
In reply to KlaasW:

A lot will depend on how often you plan to need category 4 protection. If you envisage going to the alps regularly, then something like Adidas sunglasses make sense: though the initial outlay is fairly high so is the quality, and in the long term (when your prescription changes) they work out cheaper than some other options.

If you plan on going only once, then goggles make sense, as do various home-engineered options I've seen people use. Another option *might* be contact lenses and category 4 sunglasses.
KlaasW on 28 May 2013
Problem with goggles (mine anyway) is that they limit peripheral vision and I hate that. Prescription glasses would be great, sure, but too expensive for now. Contacts? Hmm, actually maybe something to look into...
PeterBlackler - on 28 May 2013
>> Do any of you specs-wearing mountaineers have suggestions for cheapish sunglasses that will fit over normal specs? <<

I'd really recommend these here http://www.ravenspring.co.uk/zurich-sunglasses

For alpine use go for the darker density versions

My wife Sarah is wearing them over her prescription lenses in the photo here:

http://southdevonmc.ning.com/photo/100-0091

Regards,

Peter
Simon4 - on 28 May 2013
In reply to KlaasW: Don't forget if you are going onto snow, as you almost certainly will be, sunglasses over specs will not work - you really need to exclude the light from the sides, top and bottom.

I can ski in not too bright light in photochromic specs, but need prescription glacier glasses for Spring/Summer use when it is substantially bright (gaffer tape can be very useful, but you immediately lose all style points with the continentals, unless they admire "British eccentricity").
PeterBlackler - on 28 May 2013
In reply to Simon4:

>> sunglasses over specs will not work - you really need to exclude the light from the sides, top and bottom <<

actualy the "Zurich" one I mentioned pretty well achieve this because they have rims all round and especially to the sides - they were designed for skiing. The best solution I've seen for wearing with prescription glasses

Pete

alexcollins123 - on 28 May 2013
In reply to KlaasW: just get a load of daily contacts, much easier! You can buy them off the internet if you have worn them before without a prescription
NeilMac - on 28 May 2013
In reply to Marek:

I like the look of these. Is there not a bit of congestion round the back of the ears where the legs meet?
Martin W on 28 May 2013
In reply to alexcollins123:
> (In reply to KlaasW) just get a load of daily contacts, much easier!

Not easier at all if, like me, you don't get on with contacts.
Pyreneenemec - on 28 May 2013
In reply to KlaasW:

Around 1999 I bought a pair of Loubsol glacier glasses with an optical insert. These worked very well for mountaineering and ski-touring. I stopped wearing them when I started using contact lenses (much less hassle). The current model would appear to be :

http://www.sunglassesforsport.com/shop/prescription-options/loubsol-five-sp-prescription-5-lens-set/
KlaasW on 28 May 2013
In reply to Martin W:

I've never had contacts so I'm quite unsure. I somehow feel that having to mess with contacts while bivvying on a rock ledge might be a bad idea but maybe I'm just being very conservative?
Pyreneenemec - on 28 May 2013
In reply to KlaasW:

If your eyes support them, there's no reason why you couldn't leave the lenses( e.g Acuvue Oasys) in day and night for a few days. I do this regularly for up to a week, with no adverse results.
alexcollins123 - on 29 May 2013
In reply to Martin W: If by 'don't get on with lenses' you mean that its a struggle to get them in/out, and because of that your eyes irritate, then it just takes a few weeks of getting used to putting them in before they just slip in easily.

Lenses are the best thing ever, but if you are a new user, some people need a mirror, so less useful if you're in a bivvi and its blowing a hoolie outside...
Marek - on 29 May 2013
In reply to PeterBlackler:
> (In reply to Simon4)
>
> >> sunglasses over specs will not work - you really need to exclude the light from the sides, top and bottom <<
>
> actualy the "Zurich" one I mentioned pretty well achieve this because they have rims all round and especially to the sides - they were designed for skiing. The best solution I've seen for wearing with prescription glasses
>
> Pete

As do the Cocoons I mentioned earlier. They extend both over the top and under the bottom of the normal glasses (as well as round the side) to pretty much block out all perpheral light.


Simon4 - on 30 May 2013
In reply to Marek: Do you get problems with misting up with these?
Marek - on 30 May 2013
In reply to Simon4:
> (In reply to Marek) Do you get problems with misting up with these?

I assume you mean on the inside in cold conditions and heavy workload? Haven't had a problem yet. I think there's enough airflow round them to avoid too much of a problem.
KlaasW on 30 May 2013
I feel kinda guilty now for starting this: I went to the optician yesterday and ordered Oasys contacts... According to the optician, it's ok to leave them in overnight every so often, so would be fine if you have to bivvy. Now fingers crossed I will be able to get them in...
Solaris - on 30 May 2013
In reply to KlaasW:

Thanks - but I don't see any reason why you should feel guilty. You asked for advice, you got it, you acted on it, then you came back to acknowledge the advice. Five stars for courtesy, I'd say.
Pyreneenemec - on 30 May 2013
In reply to Solaris:
> (In reply to KlaasW)
>
> Five stars for courtesy, I'd say.

Indeed, I had a rant the other week, asking why so few forum users return to say thanks and what action or whatever they had taken / chosen.

Pyreneenemec - on 30 May 2013
In reply to KlaasW:
> Now fingers crossed I will be able to get them in...

You'll need a small mirror to start with, but it soon becomes 'automatic'.

I've been wearing my 'Oasys' lenses for a week now, day and night, with no problems. One can understand why opticians don't advise such methods !

To be on the safe side, see your optician regularly, at least annually.

KlaasW on 30 May 2013
In reply to Pyreneenemec:

Oh, sorry, yes thank you all very much for all the comments! The UKC forum is really great for getting advice even if you only lurk on somebody else's thread. As for the contacts: to be fair, the optician was just about to suggest Oasys when I asked for it because I read about it here. Saas Fee in just three weeks so I'd better start practicing the lense insertion procedure...
Pyreneenemec - on 30 May 2013
In reply to KlaasW:
> (In reply to Pyreneenemec)
>
> Oh, sorry, yes thank you all very much for all the comments! The UKC forum is really great for getting advice even if you only lurk on somebody else's thread. As for the contacts: to be fair, the optician was just about to suggest Oasys when I asked for it because I read about it here. Saas Fee in just three weeks so I'd better start practicing the lense insertion procedure...


I don't think anyone is after praise, but sometimes a little feedback would be welcome !



Simon4 - on 30 May 2013
In reply to Solaris:

> Thanks - but I don't see any reason why you should feel guilty

No reason to feel guilty at all, it is a widespread problem for people going to the high mountains, so it is very interesting to hear how various solutions have worked.

almost sane - on 31 May 2013
In reply to KlaasW:
Send your prescription to these guys and get a pair of Cat 4 prescription glacier glasses
http://www.uksportseyewear.co.uk/product.php/213/category-cat-4-prescription-glasses-glacier-prescri...
Rob Parsons on 31 May 2013
In reply to almost sane:

They look good, and I need a new pair. Have you actually tried them? Thanks.
Solaris - on 01 Jun 2013
In reply to Rob Parsons:

I've had a quick look at the website and it looks to me like replacement lenses when your prescription changes will cost more than with the Adidas system.
samreddevilz - on 01 Jun 2013
In reply to KlaasW: Now it's time for Google Glass.... hahaha :D :D
Simon4 - on 01 Jun 2013
In reply to Rob Parsons: Those look very similar to, or the same as, the ones I use. They are fine in high light conditions and the prescription adjustment is as good as any other prescription glasses, the only limitation is that they are obviously dark when it is less bright. If you carry photochromic standard glasses as well, you are pretty much fully covered for all circumstances including darkness (but beware, photochromic lenses may to all intents and purposes never clear if the temperature is cold).

I did have to add some duct-tape to fully exclude sidelight, also removed the bits of string as being too annoying.
Rob Parsons on 01 Jun 2013
In reply to Simon4:

Noted - thanks.

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