/ One person tent recommendation

This topic has been archived, and won't accept reply postings.
AlisonSmiles - on 13 Jun 2013
I'm planning for a trip next year. I'm looking for a one person tent to take back packing, with strength to withstand storm conditions the most important thing. It needs to be able to take me and a rucksack inside (can't stand leaving it in a porch). It needs to be able to fit in said rucksack too. I'd like it to have a bit of a porch so I can boil a kettle without everything getting exposed to the elements.

I have been using a Vango Helium Superlite 200 on loan from a friend which is in many ways the perfect tent (perfect size when packed, perfect size when used, reliably quick erection every girl needs) but I'm not sure if it could take gale force winds and stormy weather. I worry about the material and the stitching. There's already some strain showing at the apex of the door.
ade,walter - on 13 Jun 2013
In reply to AlisonSmiles: I've used a Macpac Microlight for years and think its a great tent. Simple to use, robust construction and reliable in bad conditions. Good luck with your search.
IainRUK - on 13 Jun 2013
In reply to AlisonSmiles: http://www.vaude.co.uk/reviews/item/356-power-lizard-ultralight

I've got this... need to review it, but its great. Stands up well, super rapid to pitch, inner and outer are clipped to gether once you use it once, so easy to pitch in bad weather, bit porch.

Probably 1-2 man, very spacious for 1.
AlisonSmiles - on 13 Jun 2013
In reply to IainRUK: I'm thinking that doesn't offer me more than the Vango one. I'm off to Iceland and conditions might be fairly atrocious so it's the toughness of the beast which is priority. I don't seem to need spacious somehow. Funny eh?
L.A. on 13 Jun 2013
In reply to AlisonSmiles:Have a look at a Macpac Minaret 1-2 person size, strong, small packed size,backpackable and at a reasonable price !
http://www.theoutdoorshop.com/showPart.asp?part=PN70308&product=Macpac Minaret
AlisonSmiles - on 13 Jun 2013
In reply to L.A.: That looks like a strong contender. Particularly in orange.
Jim Lancs - on 13 Jun 2013
In reply to AlisonSmiles: The Minaret is my choice for a one-person bomb proof tent.

I've sewn rock/snow flaps to mine so it will go up (and stay up) anywhere.
Tom F Harding on 13 Jun 2013
In reply to AlisonSmiles:

MSR hubba hp is worth a look at. I was in the same situation as you and after a bit of searching I went with the Hubba. Great little tent with room for you bag at you feet.
Tom F Harding on 13 Jun 2013
martinph78 on 13 Jun 2013
In reply to AlisonSmiles: Terra Nova Voyager.

It's light enough to be considered a 1 man tent, yet spacious enough for 2 (or 1 + kit inside). It has a good porch area for cooking as well, with the ability to open it three ways depending on wind direction.

I've had it pitched in most conditions and never once worried about it. It really is a 4 season tent.

I sort of wish I'd kept it now. I went for the Laser Comp and Quasar comobo, thinking that would suit all of my needs. If I could only have one tent, it would be the Voyager.
AlisonSmiles - on 13 Jun 2013
In reply to The_flying_climber:

Until reading these descriptions I hadn't really realised I missed pockets inside the tent. The Vango's interior is not pocket rich.

The macpac one looked interesting with front rather than side opening. Sigh, so many decisions. I reckon less rain would get in with that and there's a better chance of pitching it to face a sensible direction with possibly a smaller opening. Hmm.
hokkyokusei - on 13 Jun 2013
Neil Pratt - on 13 Jun 2013
In reply to hokkyokusei:

Took a Soulo out on a test last year for a high camp in some suitably grotty weather. It's pretty heavy and bulky for a 1 person tent, but I suspect it could withstand the blast from a low yield nuclear weapon if you pegged it out properly!
almost sane - on 13 Jun 2013
In reply to AlisonSmiles:
If you are under six foot and want a lot of shelter and the ability to get in and out of the tent easily in the rain, then Lightwave T10 XT might be the beast for you.
http://www.lightwave.uk.com/products/tents/trek
Nice big porch where you can get out of your wet gear, or faff with your kit, or cok, all the while your inner sanctum remains closed and dry.

Very weather resistant.

Too small for me to be comfy in, though.
captain paranoia - on 13 Jun 2013
In reply to AlisonSmiles:

You want a paranoiaproducts Stormbuster 4:

http://www.outdoorsmagic.com/gallery/image.asp?sp=&v=1&uabn=241&uin=1173

...or maybe something of similar design; Macpac Minaret, Hilleberg Nallo, Lightwave Trek, etc.

PopShot on 13 Jun 2013
In reply to AlisonSmiles: Hilleberg Akto: solid, reliable, light, packs small.
In reply to The_flying_climber:

> MSR hubba hp is worth a look at. I was in the same situation as you and after a bit of searching I went with the Hubba. Great little tent with room for you bag at you feet.

I wonder if it's a different floor plan to the normal Hubba? If not then I would actually say the inner tent feels rather small (and I'm not a huge guy - just under 5'10") in my Hubba. It's a good a little tent and the porch gives you more space, but it's not particularly roomy in the inner.
L.A. on 13 Jun 2013
In reply to TobyA: Hubba is same floorplan as the HP Just a nylon inner in the HP rather than mesh. However not really strong enough for any really stormy conditions (designed as a 3 season tent ) and fails OPs original requirements as its really too narrow and small to get a rucsac inside the inner tent
David Barratt - on 13 Jun 2013
In reply to The_flying_climber:
> (In reply to AlisonSmiles)
>
> MSR hubba hp is worth a look at.

I'd second that.
OwenM - on 13 Jun 2013
In reply to AlisonSmiles: Another vote for the Macpac Microlite http://www.theoutdoorshop.com/showPart.asp?part=PN70309&product=Macpac%20Microlight#prettyPhoto

Lighter than the Minaret and very strong, I've had mine twenty years.
In reply to L.A.: I've had my original Hubba up in stormy conditions and it was alright. I've also used it in heavy snow conditions too. Not perfect but OK for a light tent. I believe the HP version has a few more guying points as well doesn't it?
Torchy - on 13 Jun 2013
In reply to AlisonSmiles: The system I find works for me is a Rab Ridge Raider (850g...forget the pegs) plus the fly from an Alpkit Delta (weight 600g) - costs £50 and you discard the inner.

The fly only goes up in bad weather and gets left behind if forecast is very good. Sometimes I just take a Hunka and the Delta fly...it is very cosy in the Ridge Raider tho' - I love it, needs no pegs, can't blow down and I can sleep in a puddle if need be.

Timmd on 13 Jun 2013
In reply to TobyA: I guess the mesh wouldn't help in windy/cold conditions though, the draughts would go through it.
SCC - on 13 Jun 2013
In reply to AlisonSmiles:

We've got a Marmot Grid XT - which has a really big porch and the inner is snug for two.
Take a look at the standard version.
Pretty light, pitches in one (or fly first if you take the inner out) and has been bomb proof so far.

I also have a Crux X2 Storm and anything made by them (Lightwave are the same people I think) would be worth considering.

If you want to take a look at either of these (or try them out) let me know via FB.

Good luck

Si
steelbru - on 13 Jun 2013
In reply to AlisonSmiles:
Terra Nova Voyager Superlight - http://www.terra-nova.co.uk/tents-and-spares/all-tents/superlite-voyager-tent/

Great tent if you like a bit of space on your own, and not too heavy. Prefer it to the Macpac Microlight
Aly - on 13 Jun 2013
In reply to AlisonSmiles: TNF Tadpole is pretty sturdy, spacious and has a big porch, but wouldn't be the lightest as a solo tent.
kaltik - on 14 Jun 2013
In reply to AlisonSmiles: Nordisk Pasch, Svalbard I think its called now. Look it up on youtube. It took hurricane winds in a wind tunnel and survived it. I had it until recent, just sold it as i'm moving abroad and I can back up Nordisk's claims. One night at Machrihanish in severe gale force winds, camped on the beach, took it in it's stride. And it's cheaper than say Terra Nova or Hilleberg. Norwegian design and German made, relly is truly brilliant. I have battered on about this tent on the forums before but it really is that good.
Jimbo W on 14 Jun 2013
In reply to AlisonSmiles:

Lucky you going to Iceland! I've had my Hilleberg Akto in some big storms in Shetland and it was both solid and dry. Plenty of space inside, and decent side porch for rucksack, a few pockets, and was comfortable enough to do lots of reading in the stormy nights. For me it was very light weight, but I don't know how lightweight in relative terms. It's really well made, and I look forward to using it!
Call-Me-Bryce - on 14 Jun 2013
In reply to kaltik:

Second vote for the Svalbard
CarolineMc - on 14 Jun 2013
In reply to AlisonSmiles: Hilleberg Akto! You know that I pretty much live in mine each summer! It's not cheap and also not the lightest but if it ever dies I'll be replacing it with the same. Co:
ads.ukclimbing.com
drsdave - on 14 Jun 2013
In reply to AlisonSmiles:
Hilleberg Atko or Soulo. Someone is actually selling a new soulo and foot print on this site. Bomb proof atko weighs 1.5 kg, soulo 2.2kg and a storm wont destroy this little gem, plus you'll get your gear in it.
Pritchard - on 15 Jun 2013
In reply to CarolineMc:

The Akto won't meet your requirment of getting your rucksack inside the inner with you (certainly not comfortably anyway). I personally don't see why you would want to take a grotty soaking wet rucksack inside your inner with you, but each to their own. It will however easily accommodate a exped rucksack in its porch with room to still cook and ive seen you tube videos of them in up to 60 odd mph winds.

I had a friend backpack in Iceland, he said their tent zips got trashed with all the volcanic ash, so I would seriously consider whether you want to take an expensive tent.

The Vango Tempest 200 (which I also own) sounds like it would meet your requirments and its cheap, though they are pretty heavy. The Vango Banshee might be another lighter option with large inner but very small porch.

Happy shopping :)

Craig.
tripehound - on 15 Jun 2013
In reply to AlisonSmiles:
http://www.mountainlaureldesigns.com/shop/product_info.php?products_id=105

Mld duomid is an awesome tent. Its a very stable pyramid held up with either a single or an A frame made with walking poles. The inner can be custom made with a net and nylon wall..
Get the cuben fibre outer if you can for an incredible light and roomy tent.
Gav M - on 15 Jun 2013
In reply to Pritchard:

> I had a friend backpack in Iceland, he said their tent zips got trashed with all the volcanic ash, so I would seriously consider whether you want to take an expensive tent.
>

I had no issues with ash in the zips, maybe it only becomes an issue on longer trips.

Didn't see anything other than expensive tents on Iceland. The weather must take care of the cheap ones. Friends of mine experienced winds strong enough to bend the poles on a Hilleberg Nallo.
CarolineMc - on 17 Jun 2013
In reply to Pritchard:
> (In reply to CarolineMc)
>
> The Akto won't meet your requirment of getting your rucksack inside the inner with you (certainly not comfortably anyway). I personally don't see why you would want to take a grotty soaking wet rucksack inside your inner with you, but each to their own. It will however easily accommodate a exped rucksack in its porch with room to still cook and ive seen you tube videos of them in up to 60 odd mph winds.

I beg to differ!

Depending on which bags I have with me I usually have my exped rucksack half empty across the foot of the tent (still more than enough room for me and my sleeping mat) or if I want it next to me it fits in the excess half human size space to the side. If it's soaking wet I sometimes leave it in the porch but decant the contents, usually in a myriad of coloured drybags which get strewn around the inside. The tent is big enough for two (pretty cosy mind! ) so it's definitely easy to accommodate kit!

Ok so it might be a bit more difficult for someone bigger than 5ft 7, but Alison isn't!

Co:

Indy - on 17 Jun 2013
In reply to AlisonSmiles:

Anyone know why no shop or dealer (that I've ever seen at least) discounts Hilleberg?
llechwedd - on 17 Jun 2013
In reply to Indy:
I had BMC discount -can't remember how much it was, maybe 10 or 15 % - off an Akto last year at Cotswold.

Didn't get a heavy and overpriced Hilleberg footprint for it though. Used a sheet of secondary glazing film from Screwfix- about £5 , much lighter and really puncture resistant.
In reply to Indy: I guess because people will pay full price for them? They also don't change designs much so not too much "last season's" and perhaps they're not made in massive numbers so people sell out and don't need to clear stock?
AlisonSmiles - on 17 Jun 2013
In reply to All:

I am processing information! It seems I'm pretty happy with a tiddly tent. The Vango was whoppingly luxurious in size for just me and kit.

Oh. My. Word. I shall let you know which way I meander ...
Darren Jackson - on 17 Jun 2013
In reply to AlisonSmiles:

I also own an Akto, but have just ordered a Mountain Laurel Designs Trailstar tarp on the strength of the reviews that I've been reading. They're a lot cheaper than the Alto, superbly stormproof, incredibly roomy and only a smidge over 600gms in weight. It's now Chris Townsend's new favourite shelter, over his Akto, and that's good enough for me. The only downer seems to be the 8 week lead time.
Darren Jackson - on 17 Jun 2013
In reply to AlisonSmiles:

http://www.andyhowell.info/Colin-Ibbotson /Trailstar-review.pdf

... And, no, I'm not on commission.
AlisonSmiles - on 17 Jun 2013
In reply to Darren Jackson:

I think I'm going to create a spreadsheet ... pros & cons!
cb294 - on 17 Jun 2013
In reply to Indy:

No idea, you can get regularly get discounts on Hillebergs in Germany (would not have been able to afford my two tents otherwise).

CB
Up High on 17 Jun 2013
In reply to AlisonSmiles: Hi Alison, stick with the Vango they are very bombproof had mine in some wild weather and its not let me down,
you can cook inside the small flysheet if your organised, or just get a Primus eta, mega safe and a good low weight option.
Have fun.
Simon
The Lemming - on 17 Jun 2013
In reply to L.A.:

Another vote for the Macpac Minaret. My mate has one and it has withstood some awful weather. Its mostly a one one man tent if you want comfort and snug for two. The cooking area can be as big as you want, especially if you unclip the inner to give you more cooking room, if you fear burning the groundsheet.

You can also go light and just use the outer. We all did this one summer on Ingleburgh. I was biving under a tarp and my two mates were to use the outer only. The weather got so bad that I barged my way in to join them. Did I mention that we had two dogs with us?

Yep, three men and two dogs inside a macpac. Very cosy. :-)
CarolineMc - on 17 Jun 2013
In reply to Indy:
> (In reply to AlisonSmiles)
>
> Anyone know why no shop or dealer (that I've ever seen at least) discounts Hilleberg?

Because Hilleberg keep tight control over it and stop supplying retailers who discount them. The only way to get them cheaper is to wangle someone's 20% Cotswold discount, or call Alpenstock in Stockport who are Hilleberg's preferred UK supplier and offer 15% off.

Co:
TMM - on 18 Jun 2013
In reply to AlisonSmiles:

http://www.tarptent.com/scarp1.html

Loads of space, 4 season, two porches and just 1.36Kg. $315 = £200

Henrycuillin on 18 Jun 2013
In reply to AlisonSmiles: I have a Nordisk Pasch tent, the first time I used it was in gale force winds side on to the tent. It stood up a treat!
needvert on 18 Jun 2013
In reply to AlisonSmiles:

I grew up owning a macpac microlight, sold it and replaced it with a hilleberg soulo. Kind of wish I'd going with the weaker (but still bomber) hilleberg unna for the lighter weight and more space - no vestibule though.
Scottie Boy - on 18 Jun 2013
In reply to AlisonSmiles: If you are on a budget, the Blacks Octane is not bad (I got it as a replacement for an ancient Vango Microlight I had) and been out in some prety wet and windy nights in it (Scotland mainly) and it was surprisingly good - stood up better than some tents mentioned here that are ~twice the price. Its a bit weightier than your Vango but watch out that expensive (lighter tents) can SOMETIMES have an issue in stormy weather as they may not be as strong (i.e. compromise for light weight over strength) and can SOMETIMES be really "rustly" in wind -its like sitting next to someone eating crisps in the cinema. Octane is great for gear storage, pockets and cooking but prob not so good size wise if you are over 6'2"!? Cheap, ideal for UK at least, one pole and outer pitches first which is handy (i.e. can be used as a shelter or just on its own without the inner if you want to "go commando").
Indy - on 18 Jun 2013
In reply to TMM:

Looked at this myself a while back but if you think your getting one for £200 your delusional ;)

You need to add international shipping, insurance, Import duty, VAT, Customs clearance fee and if your really unlucky US sales Tax.

Then you've got to ask yourself what happens if there are problems?
goughscave - on 18 Jun 2013
In reply to AlisonSmiles: I have used a Macpac Microlite for many years and have found it superb. Easy to peg out, just 4 pegs in good weather, and spacious enough to cook in. If you really want to be lightweight just take the fly sheet. More room inside and still very weather proof.
WAYNEQ - on 18 Jun 2013
In reply to goughscave: Hilleberg Akto or terra nova laser. Ive used both and the laser in some of the worst conditions the dear lord could throw at me and the tent remained standing!!!
nscnick - on 18 Jun 2013
In reply to AlisonSmiles:

Hilleberg Soulo! I have just moved from an Akto to this. The Soulo is all but bomb proof and designed for High Mountain use (the Akto isn't), most of the other tents are really pushing it.

I have considerable experience of Iceland and the weather can be atrocious even in what they call summer. Winds of over 60/70mph not uncommon.

There are similar tents from other manufacturers but tend to be a lot heavier, bulkier and more expensive.
needvert on 19 Jun 2013
Akto in the wind, skip to 1:90 for the time poor:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aNUjVyoGEKs
kyaizawa - on 19 Jun 2013
In reply to AlisonSmiles:
Another vote for the Terra Nova Voyager - I've got the Superlite at 1.5kg, but switched out the pegs, so probably a bit heavier. A comfortable 1 + kit or you could squeeze in 2. It's an inner first semi-geo shape so it's stood up to a lot of bad weather, when other tents have failed.
I like the substantial porch space and also, unlike some of the smaller tents, you can properly sit up inside it (a problem I have with tents like the Laser Comp, etc.)
AlisonSmiles - on 19 Jun 2013
In reply to All:

I may yet share a spreadsheet on this subject! UKC Product group test ...

Most important thing to me is bomb proof. I don't care if it's a bit heavier than some or takes up space. I'm good at compromising other less important things in packing. I just want to be able to have a roof over my head ...
martinph78 on 19 Jun 2013
In reply to AlisonSmiles:

> Most important thing to me is bomb proof. I don't care if it's a bit heavier than some or takes up space. I'm good at compromising other less important things in packing. I just want to be able to have a roof over my head ...

In that case, go for the terra nova voyager, you won't be disappointed. I've got a laser comp and wouldn't say it's bomb proof, the voyager, however, was.
almost sane - on 19 Jun 2013
In reply to AlisonSmiles:
Alison, the Lightwave tents are really really strong in the wind.
IainRUK - on 19 Jun 2013
In reply to needvert: seems OK.. its a tent in 60-70 mph winds..
ads.ukclimbing.com
almost sane - on 19 Jun 2013
In reply to AlisonSmiles:

For a bit more weight and a bit more room, the Vaude Power Odyssee is very very strong, and can be had for under £300.
http://www.uttings.co.uk/Product/444/100586/vaude-power-odyssee-tent-orange-15801/

This is my tent for wild places, and it works for me as a tent I can get me and all my gubbins inside. And on expedition, I take a lot of gubbins - I am no Caroline McC :)

But it is a bit heavier than some of the options here.

What I really like about it is the way I can put it up or take it down without fuss in the most wild weather. Peg the tent down, fix the poles to the corners, and then go round the tent clipping one layer of clips at a time. When I reach the height of the guys, guy it out, then continue until it is all done. Taking it down is even easier - just unclip the outer from the poles and it falls into a wee heap, with all the pegs still in place. It is the easiest tent to erect or take down in a storm I have had. The Hilleberg Soulo / Jannu / Allak / Staika / Terra are the same. But more than double the price.
Bjartur i Sumarhus on 19 Jun 2013
In reply to AlisonSmiles: You stress bomb proof for wet and stormy conditions and no one has mentioned checking the hydrostatic head of the groundsheets of these tents.

Bear in mind many "super lightweight tents" claim to have a waterproof groundsheet when it is anything but.I have owned a few lightweight tents with groundsheets that seep water in under bodyweight because they have used a lower HH rating groundsheet to save weight

Macpac have excellent "bombproof" groundsheets with high hydrostatic head ratings that will be 100% waterproof for your purposes (HH of 10m for a minaret). Where as Terra Nova usually only have groundsheets of HH of 5m to save weight. These lower ratings are fine on snow, but shit on boggy wet soil that you could well find in Iceland.

In concluision....go for a Macpac (i don't own one, but have used friends ones and wished I did)

Orion's Face - on 19 Jun 2013
If anyone is interested in buying a second hand Akto let me know.
Jim Hamilton - on 19 Jun 2013
In reply to Bjartur í Sumarhús:
>
> In concluision....go for a Macpac (i don't own one, but have used friends ones and wished I did)

or just put a bit of plastic sheeting under your tent ?
oldie - on 19 Jun 2013
In reply to AlisonSmiles: I've been very happy with the Macpac Microlight. I bought it for the bomber groundsheet,reasonable price, ability to sit up and get a large rucksack inside, to cook in porch, and to pitch quickly with inner and groundsheet linked. It can flap a bit and is about 1.6kg.

The first time I used it in the Cairngorms there was a gale warning (unbeknown to me). The tent survived the night of what were apparently winds of up to 100mph. The peg cords were badly frayed where I'd piled rocks on them and the pole was slightly bent...I had no complaints and was grateful the tent easily remained intact.
bouldery bits - on 19 Jun 2013
In reply to AlisonSmiles:

Akto!

This topic has been archived, and won't accept reply postings.