/ So. Just what IS 'Dry Tooling'

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andyathome - on 18 Jun 2013
I came across this on another thread as a starter. And chose 'Rocktalk' as the appropriate forum rather than Winter.!

'Dry Tooling'. The practice of climbing rock routes - often bolt protected - using the equipment more commonly associated with snow and ice climbing (axes/crampons). These routes often are not climbable without said equipment, depending on small edges and (sometimes drilled)holes. In the UK 'Dry Tooling' is confined to venues agreed by consensus which have little or no interest to mainstream rock climbers.

'Mixed climbing'. The practice of ascending winter routes which may involve the use of rock features for progress AS WELL AS snow, ice and frozen turf. Hence 'mixed'. There are currently two main areas of contention; 1. The extent to which winter conditions could be said to prevail at the time of any ascent and 2. The ascent (particularly claims of first winter ascents) of established summer rock climbs where the likelihood of snow and ice and turf placements is small.
Skills/strengths developed whilst dry-tooling may be of benefit when applied to 'mixed climbing'. climber.

There is no widely established precedent in the UK of the ascent of established summer rock climbs in summer conditions using the skills etc of 'dry-tooling'.


We are really lacking in any sort of understanding about what we are talking about aren't we? Where are the definitions? And when will the BMC grasp the nettle......
Michael Gordon - on 18 Jun 2013
In reply to andyathome:

Sorry what are you asking again? You seem to have answered your own questions.
Fredt on 19 Jun 2013
In reply to
>
> There is a widely established precedent in the UK of the ascent of established summer rock climbs in summer conditions using skill, instead of 'dry-tooling'.

Fixed that for you;)
Bulls Crack - on 19 Jun 2013
In reply to andyathome:

Sport chipping
Milesy - on 19 Jun 2013
In reply to andyathome:

Can you not search for one of the 10,000 other topics on it instead of flogging the same horse?
ads.ukclimbing.com
Martin W on 19 Jun 2013
In reply to andyathome: You might consider submitting these definitions (which seem reasonably clear, useful and uncontroversial) for inclusion in the UKC Glossary: http://www.ukclimbing.com/articles/page.php?id=33

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