/ Dolomites sport climbing, accommodation?

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pawelx - on 28 Jun 2013
We're planning to do Cima Grande/Comici as the main goal of the trip, so I've booked the Lavaredo hut for this. But for the rest of the days, and for some warm-up before Comici, is it normally ok to stay in campsites, or are the approaches only sensibly short if we stay in huts? I thought I could just show up at the hut and stay, but having just got off the phone with Lavaredo and Auronzo huts, they seem fully booked on some days even as far ahead as end of July.

Before Comici, for example, I thought it would be sensible to familiarise ourselves with the type of rock by climbing some of the sport (bolted) routes in the Dolomites. Where do people normally stay for these?
GridNorth - on 28 Jun 2013
In reply to pawelx: You would probably get more benefit by doing some easier longer routes. Are you aware that the Comici, is about E3, I seem to recall, and very long. Yellow Edge is adjacent and much nearer to a grade your profile suggests you would be comfortable with.

Routes in the Dolomites are not normally long approaches.
pawelx - on 28 Jun 2013
In reply to GridNorth: thanks for this. Yes I understand that Comici is quite a bit harder than most of the climbs I've done. I would be seconding a lot of the pitches on it.

When you say the approaches aren't long, do you mean it's fine to just arrive in one of the valley towns, find a campsite, pitch a tent and just walk up to the route on the morning of the climb?
GridNorth - on 28 Jun 2013
In reply to pawelx: It varies but it is normal to park beneath the crags near to the Sella Towers for example and then the crags are only a few minutes away. A walk up from Canazei would add some considerable time to the approach.

I still think that you should climb a few longer routes rather than sport as preparation. Not only to get used to the scale of the routes but also to give you some idea of the descents which can be serious.
JLS on 28 Jun 2013
In reply to pawelx:

>"find a campsite, pitch a tent and just walk up to the route on the morning of the climb?"

That is not implauseable but having a car helps a lot to reduce the approaches. Do you have a car or are you relying on walking and public transport to get to the foot of the climbs?
pawelx - on 28 Jun 2013
In reply to JLS: we'll have a car.
I hope the campsites in Cortina don't get ridiculously busy, or are there perhaps some hostels where we could stay? I've come across situations (in the UK and elsewhere) where even campsites were fully booked on busy weekends
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JLS on 28 Jun 2013
In reply to pawelx:

The campsite in Colfosco didn't seem particularly busy anytime I walked past last year.

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