/ Alpine pack weight

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the ant hill mob - on 03 Jul 2013
Hi,

What does everyone think is a reasonable weight for a pack when in the alps? Im thinking of the weight being from the start, when nearly everything is in the pack, including bivi gear (Tarp, poles, roll mat, sleeping bag, cooker, pot, food, water, torch), spares (Gloves, primaloft jkt, waterproof top + bottom), Alpine gear (Axe, crampons, rope, harness, krabs, slings, screws, nuts, first aid kit). Ive prob forgot something on here as its written off the top of my head.

When I get home I will get mine weighed as it is packed ready (-food an water), I used huts last year, so bag was a little lighter, it feels reasonable but was wondering what the average was?

Also tarp or tent? what have people used in the past?

Thanks,

Ant
a lakeland climber on 03 Jul 2013
In reply to the ant hill mob:

tarp? Poles? Just get a bivvy bag and have done with it.

Roll Mat - drop this and use sections of karrimat stuffed down the inner sleeve of your rucksack. Serves two roles: 1. makes the rucksack comfy. 2. use for sleeping on.

I wouldn't want to be on an alpine route with much more than 15Kg of kit but it's a hard thing to measure since you are going to be wearing/using some or all of the kit at various times so it doesn't feel the same. Lots of variables: are you returning to your pre-climb bivvy or climbing with all your kit and descending a different way? No one answer to your question really.

ALC
GridNorth - on 03 Jul 2013
In reply to a lakeland climber: And no one pack.

I find the very lightweight packs a little uncomfortable when fully loaded with any significant weight. They are OK for some situations but by no means all. I have a Deuter Guide 45+ which is quite heavy but the harness is so comfortable that it makes loads easier to carry even though heavier overall.
the ant hill mob - on 03 Jul 2013
In reply to a lakeland climber: Thanks for the reply, the plan is to pack and move, and descend a different way majority of the time. Although the times where we are coming back down the same route, kit will be packed and stashed ready for return trip.rather than carrying weight for no reason.

Poles will be walking poles, which will I need due to having some knee problems this year.

I have a folding mat, from when i was in the forces. I might find that as it will stuff down the back easier, although it is a bit thinner than a karrimat. I was initially thinking of using the ridge rest that i used this winter, very warm, but overkill for summer alps?

My pack is def not 15kg, def lower than this.
the ant hill mob - on 03 Jul 2013
In reply to GridNorth: Just got a grivel alpine 45+ on here, seems to be the perfect size and a week in wales to try out weight and comfort should suffice.
999thAndy on 03 Jul 2013
In reply to the ant hill mob:

If you haven't seen it, this is worth 5 minutes read http://bobwightman.co.uk/climb/gear.php?p=alp_gear
OwenM - on 03 Jul 2013
In reply to a lakeland climber:
> (In reply to the ant hill mob)
>
> tarp? Poles? Just get a bivvy bag and have done with it.
>
>
> I wouldn't want to be on an alpine route with much more than 15Kg of kit
>
> Not an Alpine route but for the Skye ridge I'm working on getting my kit down to 6kg + water. Not sure how much water we'll be carrying but maybe 2kg more. Obviously no axe or crampons etc in that weight.

robthered - on 03 Jul 2013
In reply to the ant hill mob:

My pack (Crux AK-47X) with everything for a week - bivi gear (bag, not tent), limited rack, crampons, axe, first aid kit etc etc (even some food) - last year was 13.5kg. This year, mainly by buying lighter/better gear it was around 2kg lighter. Am aiming for closer to 10kg next year but probably unrealistic.






joe.91 - on 03 Jul 2013
In reply to the ant hill mob: Mine packed for an ice couloir style route without food and water is 13kg (so double axe, full screw rack etc)
Rick Graham on 03 Jul 2013
In reply to GridNorth:

Are you sure we are not all being trolled ?

Anyway, think light, half it (twice) and don't stop.

Read the original Blackshaw advice, never bettered IMHO.
IainL on 03 Jul 2013
In reply to the ant hill mob: 20lbs as max we had in sixties climbing in Cascades in NW USA. Included everything for weekend alpine climbing.
TRip - on 04 Jul 2013
In reply to Rick Graham:
> (In reply to GridNorth)
>
> Read the original Blackshaw advice, never bettered IMHO.

What is that advice Rick?

The advice in Climbing Ice by Choinard is also very good still very relevant today.
Rick Graham on 04 Jul 2013
In reply to TRip:
> (In reply to Rick Graham)
> [...]
>
> What is that advice Rick?
>
Are you trying to wind me up.
Read it yourself.

> The advice in Climbing Ice by Choinard is also very good still very relevant today.

Agreed but I would never bother with a flask ( wrap a bottle in spare clothing ) and always carry a stove in high mountains.

Oceanic - on 04 Jul 2013
In reply to Rick Graham:
> (In reply to GridNorth)

> Read the original Blackshaw advice, never bettered IMHO.

I can believe that he will be able to find a second hand copy of Blackshaw, but I think a Zdarsky sack might be a bit harder to track down.

To the OP - your question is very general. Gear for camping at the bottom of an alpine rock climb is very different to gear for bivying half way along the Peutrey Integral.
Rick Graham on 05 Jul 2013
In reply to TRip:

Hi Tom

Got an old copy in the house somewhere you can read sometime.

I first read it about twenty years too late. (attended the school of hard knocks).

I may be corrected but Blackshaw and his chums were probably the first British climbers to do hard Grande Courses guideless. His advice was amazingly astute and comprehensive and has dated well.
David Bennett - on 05 Jul 2013
In reply to the ant hill mob: rick graham
First read this many years ago. I actually bought it again to teach rope work to my son it's such a good book. 50p on ebay! Actually was reading it yesterday after this thread......

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