/ Primus Omnilite Ti - yellow flame issue

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ferdia - on 07 Jul 2013
I recently got this stove, tested it at home (performed fine) and took it away on a trip this month.

The stove was used once with a nearly empty butane/propane etc canister - all good. The next time it was used a full gas canister was attached, and liquid fuel was spitting from the jet and a fierce yellow flame about 2.5 ft tall was emitted. Let this run for a good 3 or 4 minutes to see if the stove needed to 'warm up' or whether it would perform better once canister less full. No change. Tried again with another much less full canister. Still a ridiculously large yellow flame (even with gas turned as low as possible).

Triple checked right jet size was being used.

Any thoughts before I contact Primus?
rmt - on 07 Jul 2013
In reply to mctinkno: I had something similar with mine. I found that I had to turn it down really low to start with, whilst it warmed up, and then turn it up once it was warm. If I just left it on high it continued to chuck out a massive flame as you described.
martinph78 on 08 Jul 2013
In reply to mctinkno: I find 99% of problems with the Primus stoves are down to a blocked jet, although maybe this is the 1% of other problems that they have.

As you are on gas I'm not sure (mines nearly always used on liquid fuels). The only problem I had with gas was the flame kept going out, and again that was a blocked jet.

Sorry I can't be much more help, I've seen your problem many times on liquid and it's to do with trying to prime it too quickly, wouldn't think that's an issue with gas though. Unless you are using the canister inverted? In which case it will require priming of the stove.

Might not be much help, but recent contact with the distributer about new jets resulted in an interesting find. Apparently the stove can run with any jet installed, the different sizes are optimal so more fuel efficient, but you can run using any size jet if you find yourself stuck one day. I've done it before and it doesn't give a clean burn, but does burn.
ferdia - on 09 Jul 2013
In reply to Martin1978: Thanks for replies.

Yes, would be good if it would chill out when I turned gas right down, but it got to the point where the huge flame cut out but with liquid gas still spitting from jet.
captain paranoia - on 09 Jul 2013
In reply to mctinkno:

Liquid fuel spitting from the jet? Did you have the canister inverted? If not, I see no reason why liquid fuel should be getting to the jet (gas should be boiling off the surface of the liquid and escaping via the valve)

If you had the canister inverted, then you may not have allowed the pre-heat tube to warm up enough before inverting the cylinder. If you have a tall, yellow flame, it's not burning efficiently, so probably won't heat the pre-heat tube properly, so the situation will never get better.

An empty canister may not have enough liquid in it to allow liquid fuel to reach the valve when inverted but resting on its side, so only gas will come out.

That's my theory. So, run it again with a non-inverted canister for a while before inverting, and if it still sprays liquid fuel (or you never had the canister inverted to start with), get on to Primus.

Sadly, Primus' website is very light on design details or user manual, so it's hard to see how it's meant to be used; I can't even see if there is a pre-heat tube. Their 'read more' links are circular...
ferdia - on 09 Jul 2013
In reply to captain paranoia: Thanks, I wouldn't normally invert a canister/put it on its side unless it were running low, but as I can't remember the orientation of all the canisters we tried (!!) it's worth giving it another run.

Almost certain the full canister would have been upright, which would still leave me with a problem. Can't be running all my canisters low just to get a sensible flame!
nniff - on 09 Jul 2013
In reply to mctinkno:

It does sound as though you've got the level of the liquid gas in the cylinder above the connector if liquid gas emerges if the flame is out. With the best will in the world, liquid gas is not going to enter the tube in normal orientation, and 'gaseous gas' is not going to liquidise again once it's out of its cylinder.
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captain paranoia - on 09 Jul 2013
In reply to nniff:

> It does sound as though you've got the level of the liquid gas in the cylinder above the connector if liquid gas emerges if the flame is out. With the best will in the world, liquid gas is not going to enter the tube in normal orientation, and 'gaseous gas' is not going to liquidise again once it's out of its cylinder.

That was my thinking.

Another thought has occurred to me... has the stove previously been used for a genuine liquid fuel, i.e. petrol or paraffin? In which case, it might have been residue in the fuel pipeline being blown out by the gas. But I can't see that going on for a few minutes.

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