/ Where to get QMDs in Scotland - Summer conditions

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alexgoodey on 17 Jul 2013
I've walked in most parts of England and Wales, but never in Scotland and I've been advised by some ML assessors to get some experience there as it's "quite different".

So I'm in the early stages of planning a trip. Ideally I'd like to go up with some friends and spend 4-5 days at a bunkhouse doing various loops to get a nice broad range of experience, a little scrambling, a mix of ground types, a mix of zones, etc.

Directed at those of you with good experience of the Scottish Mountains, where would be a good base for this sort of trip? Low budget, but not camping, but I would like to stay within the ML remit and still stretch my experiences and knowledge.

Thanks in advance
Richy boy on 17 Jul 2013
In reply to alexgoodey: Theres a youth hostel in Tyndrum which is within walking distance of many circular routes of the Tyndrum hills. Crainlarich which is further south also offers plenty of walking routes of the Crainlarich hills. Even further south you have the Arrochar Alps, however I'm unsure about accommodation in this area. Alternatively you could camp at the red squirrel campsite in Glencoe which has enough walking to satisfy any mountain goat. Also there is a youth hostel, or two, up in Fort William which is a good base for the Mamore mountains and the Grey Corries.

Richy.
Eric9Points - on 17 Jul 2013
In reply to alexgoodey:

Achnashellach wouldn't be a bad base, there's a hostel there. I think there's also a hostel at Achnasheen.

Torridon? If you could get into the Ling hut which is owned by the SMC.

Aviemore or around there is a good centre. The Cairngorms are on your doorstep (I assume you've got a car) but the West coast is also easily accessible.
Eric9Points - on 17 Jul 2013
In reply to alexgoodey:

Here's a directory of independent hostels in Scotland.

http://www.hostel-scotland.co.uk/find-a-hostel.htm

Buzz87 - on 17 Jul 2013
In reply to alexgoodey:

I was in the same boat as you so I headed to Glencoe last week!

I picked Glencoe as there were loads of options to head both North and South to collect some classic days.

When I looked at the Cairngorms they appeared more of a multi-day/expedition venue.
rabthecairnterrier - on 18 Jul 2013
In reply to alexgoodey:
If you're looking to gain Scottish experience specifically for ML purposes you might be better off doing some genuine wild camping rather than basing yourself in a bunkhouse. Remember it's legal here and - in summer at least - is much more common then in E & W. Also gets you out into the wilder and less frequented areas, which would be good for your logbook.
IainRUK - on 18 Jul 2013
In reply to alexgoodey: Anyway where with munro's or corbetts is within the remit...

Go somewhere more trackless.. Somewhere quite central would be good so you can get a taste of the west and east pretty close. Even from fort william its not too bad to drive through to the A9 and do something that side.
IainRUK - on 18 Jul 2013
In reply to Buzz87:
> (In reply to alexgoodey)
>
> I was in the same boat as you so I headed to Glencoe last week!
>
> I picked Glencoe as there were loads of options to head both North and South to collect some classic days.
>
> When I looked at the Cairngorms they appeared more of a multi-day/expedition venue.

Loads of day walks in the cairngorms.. often longer but quicker terrain. From the Linn of Dee you have numerous options.
Dnmn - on 18 Jul 2013
In reply to alexgoodey: dear Alex
Why not get hold of Cameron mcneish's book 'the munro's' .
It's got route suggestions for all of them including access and egress, which tend to be tricky in occasion. It's the long walk ins up the glens that make them feel so remote!!

Best of luck

D
ccmm on 18 Jul 2013 - host86-181-103-223.range86-181.btcentralplus.com
In reply to alexgoodey: I'd echo what Rab says above. Get up high and camp out. Good for the logbook and it makes so much more sense logistically.

Cairngorms are the obvious choice for overnight trips (the bothies here are very good too), should tick all your nav boxes if the clag comes in. There's really nothing else quite like the area in the British Isles. If you're really not into camping can you take a bike? Estate tracks are a fantastic way to get the miles in on approach to the more remote hills.

For contrast nip along the A86 to Lochaber for the pointier experience.

I'd also say try and get out on your own for a bit. I find I get more done that way and it's good to be responsible for the consequences of your actions. It can help inform decision making processes when leading groups in the hills.
IainRUK - on 18 Jul 2013
In reply to Craig Mc: ben Alder would also be great as an overnighter...
ccmm on 18 Jul 2013 - host86-181-103-223.range86-181.btcentralplus.com
In reply to IainRUK: Aye, or it's doable in a (long) day, including Beinn Bheoil, from Dalwhinnie on a bike.
Scomuir on 18 Jul 2013
In reply to Buzz87:
> (In reply to alexgoodey)
>
> When I looked at the Cairngorms they appeared more of a multi-day/expedition venue.

Anywhere in the Cairngorms is accessible for a day trip.

With reference to the OP, I don't know what the "ML remit" is, but part of me thinks that should include the ability to look at an OS map, and just decide what looks like a good day out.
CurlyStevo - on 18 Jul 2013
In reply to IainRUK:
> (In reply to Buzz87)
> [...]
>
> Loads of day walks in the cairngorms.. often longer but quicker terrain. From the Linn of Dee you have numerous options.

Some really good stuff from Cairngorm Mountain Ski Centre car park. One of my favourite walks basically goes across the plateaux, to drop down to Loch Avon, up to loch etchacan, around the top of Corrie Sputan Dearg, up Ben Macdui and back to the car park. Its about 15 miles and probably more than a munro in ascent.
alexgoodey on 19 Jul 2013
In reply to alexgoodey: Thank for all the input peeps, I'll have a look at some maps now I have some place names to start with.
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fmck - on 19 Jul 2013
In reply to rabthecairnterrier:

Sod that at this time of year. Unless of course you have a good wind blowing.

A bothy to bothy trip would be my suggestion. A list of most bothies are listed on the MBA website.

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