/ Met office nannying

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Oceanrower - on 17 Jul 2013
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-23341504

"Health warnings have been issued as heatwave conditions are reached in London and the South East.

The Met Office issued a "Level 3" warning on the hottest day of the year, with temperatures hitting 32C (89.6F) at Northolt, west London."

Oh, for pity's sake. OK, it's warm. Everyone knows it's warm.

Do they have to issue a warning for every bloody type of weather we get?

highclimber - on 17 Jul 2013
In reply to Oceanrower: MAkes you laugh. it's been hot for two weeks. people often jet off to places a lot hotter than it is here for that length of time! Then again, there are the people who can't escape the heat like the elderly but a blanket warning on the heat is pretty pointless for the majority of the population.
anonymouse - on 17 Jul 2013
In reply to Oceanrower:
Feel free to ignore the warnings.

Some folks don't realise how stressful heat can be until it's too late. Other's, particularly the elderly, don't feel hot even when they are. I think it's also partly about preparing the health services for an increase in admittances related to the heat.

http://www.metoffice.gov.uk/public/weather/heat-health/

Level 3: This stage requires social and healthcare services to target specific actions at high-risk groups.
dissonance - on 17 Jul 2013
In reply to Oceanrower:

> Do they have to issue a warning for every bloody type of weather we get?

if it can be dangerous then yes it probably helps.
Heatwaves definitely tick that box.
AndrewHuddart - on 17 Jul 2013
In reply to Oceanrower:

Chunks of weather like this generate sizable spikes in mortality rates in the elderly and in those with pre-existing health issues - not just killing those who would die soon enough anyway; in 2003, heat killed >2000 people for instance.

Met Office and Public Health Endgland nannying? Depends on what you call trying to save lives.
anonymouse - on 17 Jul 2013
In reply to AndrewHuddart:
> in 2003, heat killed >2000 people for instance.

In Europe the toll was more than 10 times that: 20,000+

In hot weather more people are liable to be outside playing outdoorsy games, breaking legs and arms, gunning about on their motorbikes, slaloming between caravans on the way up the A65, getting sloshed and falling asleep in the sun, running round like a mad bastard and getting heat stroke.

The thing about weather is that it effects us all in some way. There's 70 million of us in the UK, so there's a lot of money to be saved, and, more importantly, lives to be saved from statistical risks. Even if something affects a tenth of a tenth of one percent of the population, that's still 7000 people.
Dax H - on 17 Jul 2013
In reply to Oceanrower: People complain at pointless warnings but people also complain if we are not warned, its easier to issue a warning than deal with the aftermath if someone dies without being warned.
DancingOnRock - on 17 Jul 2013
In reply to Oceanrower: My friend's aunty had a fall on Monday morning. She lay on the floor for 14hours before they found her. She was in a bad way.

Another friend aged 32 was on a saline drip yesterday after dehydrating badly.

Advice is always welcome.
estivoautumnal - on 17 Jul 2013
In reply to anonymouse:
> (In reply to AndrewHuddart)
> [...]
>
> In Europe the toll was more than 10 times that: 20,000+
>


True, but it was a lot hotter than 30 degrees. Most countries in most of the world get 30+ degrees every year and just as snow paralysis the UK, a few degrees of heat seems to bring out the summer equivalent here.

Totally agree with the op.
DancingOnRock - on 17 Jul 2013
In reply to estivoautumnal: It's because, like the snow, we idiotically try to carry on as if everything was normal. In other countries, people slow down, dress better, take siestas. In the UK we cram ourselves onto tube trains in suits and hold meetings all day. Madness!
estivoautumnal - on 17 Jul 2013
In reply to DancingOnRock:

I work in Singapore where the temp is 33 degrees every day and life continues. Labours labour. Builders build. Tube (MRT) goers go.

But I do agree, wearing a suit when it's over 30 is a bit mad. Advantage of hot countries is that you can plan city journeys according to air conditioned shopping centres.

Not many siestas in Asia.
Bobling - on 17 Jul 2013
In reply to estivoautumnal:


I was discussing something similar with my wife. Malaysia, where we have family, is almost always 30 degrees or thereabout and life doesn't stop. The difference is that for them it is normal so they are used to dealing with it, and also they have a LOT more air-conditioning.
DancingOnRock - on 17 Jul 2013
In reply to estivoautumnal: Also, as you say, it's like that everyday. It takes between 9-14 days for us to acimatise to heat. In the UK we constantly swing between hot and cold in the space of a week. Friday and Saturday are going to be cool, then next week hot again. We don't really stand a chance.
Bulls Crack - on 17 Jul 2013
In reply to Oceanrower:

You don't have to read or heed it
NeilMac - on 17 Jul 2013
In reply to Oceanrower:

You should try reading the article in the link you post.

That will help prevent others thinking you're an idiot.

Stay cool!
dr_botnik - on 17 Jul 2013
In reply to Oceanrower: I don't wanna go off on a rant, but you seem pretty ignorant of people in less fortunate positions than yourself. Level 3 warnings trigger certain action plans in places such as care homes for the elderly. Call it a nanny state if you will, but I myself will be glad of that level of regulation when I reach an age where I am unable to care for myself.
Oceanrower - on 17 Jul 2013
In reply to NeilMac: Err, I have read it. I'm just not sure why we need to be warned that it's hot.

I'd noticed that it was hot, didn't you?
Oceanrower - on 17 Jul 2013
In reply to dr_botnik: So a care home is unable to take measures unless told to by someone else?
dissonance - on 17 Jul 2013
In reply to Oceanrower:

> I'd noticed that it was hot, didn't you?

well I havent noticed it is hot tomorrow, not hundred per cent sure how you have?
As for the various organisations, well they could all come up with their own criteria and guesses but I would have thought it would make sense to have the Met office do it for them.
dr_botnik - on 18 Jul 2013
In reply to Oceanrower:

should the patients be mobile but not have the mental capacity to ensure their own safety, once a level 3 heatwave is put in place it is a requirement for patients to be in shaded areas between 11 and 3. Yes, this is common sense, but by creating a safe standard we are able to judge whether a care home has acted in a safe manner. There are further requirements that I cant remember off the top of my head, but every care home should have action plans detailing appropriate measures that are triggered in these instances.

This is called science, its the crowning glory of our current society. In the olden days if a crow flew east to west it was said to bring an ill wind, nowadays we understand that there are physical responses the body enacts in certain environments and we can define these with independantly observable common measures (such as the celcius scale) and define appropriate reactions; instead of old bill dying of heat exhaustion because his carer thought "he looked perky and had a cup of water with breakfast" we are able to monitor accurately record and monitor temperatures and understand how these trigger an increase in the uptake of the fluids by a human body. Yes, this may not bother you, and I hope that it doesn't bother old bill either because his carers are observant to his physical state, but by creating regulations we create safeguards to protect the vulnerable.
teflonpete - on 18 Jul 2013
In reply to highclimber:
> (In reply to Oceanrower) Then again, there are the people who can't escape the heat like the elderly but a blanket warning on the heat is pretty pointless for the majority of the population.

Yes, a blanket warning is pretty pointless when the Met Office could just pop round and tell anyone over the age of 70 personally that it's going to be hot.

Very easy to be complacent about excessive heat when we work in air conditioned offices and travel in air conditioned cars. Bit more difficult if you're practically housebound and can't escape the heat. Heatwave warnings are exactly what the Met Office should be doing.
NeilMac - on 18 Jul 2013
In reply to Oceanrower:


If you do care to read the article you'll see that it says, "The warning alerts healthcare services...".


anonymouse - on 18 Jul 2013
In reply to estivoautumnal:
> True, but it was a lot hotter than 30 degrees. Most countries in most of the world get 30+ degrees every year and just as snow paralysis the UK, a few degrees of heat seems to bring out the summer equivalent here.

It depends what you are used to. If temperatures regularly exceed 30C in your country, you get accustomed to it. The same happens on a smaller scale here. If you look at the Met Office site, the threshold for warnings varies throughout the country. I imagine its based on historical hospital admissions and temperature data. Humidity also plays a role. I have an Australian colleague who's used to 30+C at home, but can't stand the mid to high 20s in the UK because of the humidity.
Jon Dittman - on 18 Jul 2013
In reply to Oceanrower: Would you be making the same comments of Met Office nannying with regard to flooding? Or snow? Or wind?

We forget, heat is an extreme weather phenomenon and when the mercury hits a certain level, the death rate goes up significantly.

But I suppose that doesn't really matter and that we shouldn't care?
Irk the Purist - on 18 Jul 2013
In reply to Oceanrower:

I am a parent of a two week old baby who thinks British summer time is 30 degree heat and Wimbledon winners. The thermometer hasn't gone below 18 degrees since he was born.

Luckily he is feeding well, I have a house with a garden and some financial security so with the application of some common sense and some new toys (fans, parasols etc) I have managed to keep my son reasonably cool. It is easy to imagine that new parents with babies who won't feed, or with less financial security, or living in a one bed flat with no garden or dare I say it, a little less common sense and concern for their child's welfare, would benefit from state intervention at this time.

I will be fully appreciating today's visit and will be lapping up all the advice and help I can get from them. If nothing else, this warning should reming people that the heat is a serious danger to some people.

What else should the government's weather service be doing?
Alyson - on 18 Jul 2013
In reply to estivoautumnal:
> (In reply to DancingOnRock)
>
> Not many siestas in Asia.

My husband just got back from a business trip to China, delivering a training programme to HSBC staff in Guangzhou. In their lunch break every day, each member of staff got a pillow out of their bag (actually a lot of the women apparently used teddy bears..?!), put it on the desk, rested their head on it and fell asleep for an hour.

The first time he and his English colleague walked back into a silent office with everyone asleep he had no idea what was going on. Apparently itís something to do with reinforcing the message of how hard theyíre working/how many hours they all do Ė that they need a nap in order to keep working. Iíve no idea how widespread this is mind.
silhouette - on 18 Jul 2013
In reply to Oceanrower: It's not nannying, it's sound advice. Now tax breaks for marriage, which I suspect you support, that's nannying.
MG - on 18 Jul 2013
In reply to Alyson: A chinese former colleague of mine used to do this. Rather disconcerting.
Oceanrower - on 18 Jul 2013
In reply to silhouette: What a strange thing to say. I have no opinion either way on marriage tax breaks asnd really don't understand why you think I should.
The New NickB - on 18 Jul 2013
In reply to estivoautumnal:
> (In reply to DancingOnRock)
>
> I work in Singapore where the temp is 33 degrees every day and life continues. Labours labour. Builders build. Tube (MRT) goers go.
>
> But I do agree, wearing a suit when it's over 30 is a bit mad. Advantage of hot countries is that you can plan city journeys according to air conditioned shopping centres.
>
> Not many siestas in Asia.

I wonder how Singapore would cope with a foot of snow.
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MG - on 18 Jul 2013
In reply to The New NickB:
> (In reply to estivoautumnal)
> [...]
>
> I wonder how Singapore would cope with a foot of snow.

It would be put in very neat piles, remain perfectly white and melt overnight to avoid inconvenience. Anyone making footsteps in the piles would be fined.
Jon Dittman - on 18 Jul 2013
In reply to silhouette:
> (In reply to Oceanrower) It's not nannying, it's sound advice. Now tax breaks for marriage, which I suspect you support, that's nannying.

It's not nannying. It is the government saying that they want people in relationships to be married and will incentivise them. Tax breaks in other countries have altered the birth and death rates in the past. It is no different to giving tax breaks to companies that move into areas of high unemployment.
Hayden Carr - on 18 Jul 2013
In reply to Oceanrower: Heard on the radio this morning that one year (2003?), there were 2,000 deaths related to a heatwave of 10 days. 'You and I' are not the ones at risk. There was a lady from a care home saying how the elderly still wanted to wear vests, 'wrap up warm', didn't want to open windows because of draughts etc.

So the best case scenario is that the level 3 warning saves the lives of some elderly or poorly people. Worst case is that you get on your high horse for a bit. Is that a fair deal?
blurty - on 18 Jul 2013
In reply to Hayden Carr:
> (In reply to Oceanrower) Heard on the radio this morning that one year (2003?), there were 2,000 deaths related to a heatwave of 10 days. 'You and I' are not the ones at risk. There was a lady from a care home saying how the elderly still wanted to wear vests, 'wrap up warm', didn't want to open windows because of draughts etc.
>

Some of the old people at the care-home where my mum works have 'shuffled off' recently, two this week, one last. The met office warning is entirely legit I'd say
Steve John B - on 18 Jul 2013
In reply to Eric the Red:
> (In reply to Oceanrower)
>
> I am a parent of a two week old baby who thinks British summer time is 30 degree heat and Wimbledon winners. The thermometer hasn't gone below 18 degrees since he was born.
>
> Luckily he is feeding well, I have a house with a garden and some financial security so with the application of some common sense and some new toys (fans, parasols etc) I have managed to keep my son reasonably cool. It is easy to imagine that new parents with babies who won't feed, or with less financial security, or living in a one bed flat with no garden or dare I say it, a little less common sense and concern for their child's welfare, would benefit from state intervention at this time.
>
> I will be fully appreciating today's visit and will be lapping up all the advice and help I can get from them. If nothing else, this warning should reming people that the heat is a serious danger to some people.

What a load of patronising guff! We've got a 4 week old baby, we haven't got a garden or a parasol and he has no idea whether I'm overdrawn or not, but we don't need the social services to come round and waft tenners at him to keep him cool. I understand they are already quite busy.

Out of curiosity, what special baby-related state intervention do you think should be taking place because of the hot weather? Presumably your visit today is a regular midwife sign-off, rather than a crack team of air conditioned nurses.
Philip on 18 Jul 2013
In reply to Steve John B:

My wife asked about giving additional water to our baby. They said only in extreme weather - this was on Tuesday. You have to wonder what they meant by extreme weather, and also whether any extreme weather (flood, freezing, hurricane) counts.

I've found a bath in 35C water seems to work very well. It's cool enough to take the heat away without being cold enough to stop the blood getting to the surface.
Andy from Aberdeen on 18 Jul 2013
In reply to Oceanrower:
> http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-23341504
>
> "Health warnings have been issued as heatwave conditions are reached in London and the South East.
>
> The Met Office issued a "Level 3" warning on the hottest day of the year, with temperatures hitting 32C (89.6F) at Northolt, west London."
>
> Oh, for pity's sake. OK, it's warm. Everyone knows it's warm.
>
> Do they have to issue a warning for every bloody type of weather we get?

Could not agree more!
Trevers - on 18 Jul 2013
In reply to Oceanrower:

I don't think it's nannying by the Met Office- after all they're there to advise on the weather as well.

What is bloody annoying is the London Underground giving constant voice announcements that "customers are reminded" that a bottle of water may be a good idea in the heat. It makes you wonder how abysmally stupid they think people are. On the other hand observing the way that people behave on the tube during rush hour, I can see why they may have reached that conclusion...
Neil Williams - on 18 Jul 2013
In reply to Trevers:

Though we also had hot days when I was a kid, and people didn't obsessively carry bottles of water around then.

Neil
Blue Straggler - on 18 Jul 2013
In reply to Oceanrower:

You are much better than everyone else.

There. Is that what you wanted to read? You certainly come across that way.
ex0 - on 18 Jul 2013
In reply to Blue Straggler:

Are you reading a different post than me? It certainly comes across that way..
DancingOnRock - on 18 Jul 2013
In reply to Steve John B:
> (In reply to Eric the Red)
> [...]
>
> What a load of patronising guff! We've got a 4 week old baby, we haven't got a garden or a parasol and he has no idea whether I'm overdrawn or not, but we don't need the social services to come round and waft tenners at him to keep him cool. I understand they are already quite busy.
>
> Out of curiosity, what special baby-related state intervention do you think should be taking place because of the hot weather? Presumably your visit today is a regular midwife sign-off, rather than a crack team of air conditioned nurses.

Has the heat got to you?
ceri - on 18 Jul 2013
In reply to MG: I too had a Chinese colleague who used to go home for an hours nap at lunch time. A fine use of flexible working hours, if a little odd!
Irk the Purist - on 18 Jul 2013
In reply to Steve John B:

Sorry, I knew someone would read that the wrong way but as you know time is limited for rewriting posts!

I don't think it's patronising to point out that there are bad parents out there who may not think about keeping their child out of the sun, or won't think twice about keeping him in their cute wooly hat. If they didn't exist, social services wouldn't exist. I was glad for the advice on keeping him hydrated and how to keep him out of heat induced slumber when eating.

Young babies are at risk in this weather and at risk people should be protected.

In reply to Oceanrower: I agree with you.
In reply to ceri:
> (In reply to MG) I too had a Chinese colleague who used to go home for an hours nap at lunch time. A fine use of flexible working hours, if a little odd!

A colleague of mine is much more efficient - she just sleeps at her desk, whenever...
DancingOnRock - on 18 Jul 2013
In reply to Oceanrower: Now extended to South West England.

http://m.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-23355833

I still don't understand that some of you guys don't understand that it's aimed at healthcare providers. It triggers things like ensuring stocks of saline drips are at correct levels etc.

It amazes me how much ignorance there is.
estivoautumnal - on 18 Jul 2013
In reply to DancingOnRock:
>
> I still don't understand that some of you guys don't understand that it's aimed at healthcare providers. It triggers things like ensuring stocks of saline drips are at correct levels etc.
>
> It amazes me how much ignorance there is.


Can't the healthcare providers step outside and say...ohh, it's hot, lets provide some extra saline drips? Ohh, and the forecast is for hot weather for a week, lets provide more drips.

Do you really think they need a warning to work that one out?

anonymouse - on 18 Jul 2013
In reply to estivoautumnal:
> Can't the healthcare providers step outside and say...ohh, it's hot, lets provide some extra saline drips? Ohh, and the forecast is for hot weather for a week, lets provide more drips.
>
> Do you really think they need a warning to work that one out?

The heat warnings are produced in collaboration between health service and met office. What you suggest is exactly what they are doing. And you are ridiculing them for it. I think that makes you a tit.
DancingOnRock - on 18 Jul 2013
In reply to estivoautumnal:

No. As others on this thread have demonstrated with comments like, it's hot get over it, it's hotter in other countries, deal with it.

The level 3 warning is triggered at different levels for different parts of the country. It's based on historical data gathered from the number of deaths during hot weather and is different for different parts of the country. 640-800 people have died already.

ie It's lower up north and higher in London. What is quite a nice day for some of us could literally mean death for others.
estivoautumnal - on 18 Jul 2013
In reply to anonymouse:

You are missing my point. By a long way. That makes you a tit.
estivoautumnal - on 18 Jul 2013
In reply to DancingOnRock:
>
>
> The level 3 warning is triggered at different levels for different parts of the country. It's based on historical data gathered from the number of deaths during hot weather and is different for different parts of the country. 640-800 people have died already.
>
>

Yes, but it's 30 degrees, not 40.
DancingOnRock - on 18 Jul 2013
In reply to estivoautumnal:
> (In reply to anonymouse)
>
> You are missing my point. By a long way. That makes you a tit.

The point is; When is a 'bit hot' for you and me, deadly to the old and infirm? 20'C, 25'C, 28'C, 17'C over night?
DancingOnRock - on 18 Jul 2013
In reply to estivoautumnal:
> (In reply to DancingOnRock)
> [...]
>
> Yes, but it's 30 degrees, not 40.

Which demonstrates your complete lack of understanding of the effects of the heat on UK citizens.
estivoautumnal - on 18 Jul 2013
In reply to DancingOnRock:

>17'C over night?

Hmm. 17? Cooler than the average office.
DancingOnRock - on 18 Jul 2013
In reply to estivoautumnal:
> (In reply to DancingOnRock)
>
> >17'C over night?
>
> Hmm. 17? Cooler than the average office.

Exactly - think about it...
estivoautumnal - on 18 Jul 2013
In reply to DancingOnRock:

I wasn't calling you a tit btw.
Alyson - on 18 Jul 2013
In reply to estivoautumnal: Why would you prefer to have healthcare professionals assessing the weather and spending their time checking long range forecasts rather than, you know, providing healthcare?
estivoautumnal - on 18 Jul 2013
In reply to Alyson:

What is there about a forecast temp of 30 degrees that needs assessed? Do they really need a warning as well?

A bit like saying the temp will drop below freezing. Ice warning!
DancingOnRock - on 18 Jul 2013
In reply to estivoautumnal:
> (In reply to DancingOnRock)
>
> I wasn't calling you a tit btw.

I know that. As Sarah points out. It's a forecast, you can't go out and say it's a bit hot today. You get a warning that says; prepare because next week you're going to be inundated with accidents, sun burn, and other heat related illnesses. Not just a few because its a bit hot.

Just on the news, a level 4 is a national emergency!
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estivoautumnal - on 18 Jul 2013
In reply to freerangecat:

Not my argument. I am simply saying that if it's forecast for 30 degrees do we need a warning saying it will be 30 degrees? Surely the fact that is forecast is enough.

estivoautumnal - on 18 Jul 2013
In reply to DancingOnRock:
> (In reply to estivoautumnal)
> [...]
>
> I know that. As Sarah points out. It's a forecast, you can't go out and say it's a bit hot today. You get a warning that says; prepare because next week you're going to be inundated with accidents, sun burn, and other heat related illnesses. Not just a few because its a bit hot.
>
Yes. But is the forecast on its own not enough? Does a warning need to accompany it?
DancingOnRock - on 18 Jul 2013
In reply to estivoautumnal:
> (In reply to Alyson)
>
> What is there about a forecast temp of 30 degrees that needs assessed? Do they really need a warning as well?
>
> A bit like saying the temp will drop below freezing. Ice warning!

No. A bit of ice isn't a problem for a huge proportion of the population. Most of us can deal with it without incident.

-20 for 5 days? That's a different story.

30'C is 10'C above the usual average. It's a killer for people who are not used to it.

estivoautumnal - on 18 Jul 2013
In reply to DancingOnRock:
> (In reply to estivoautumnal)
> [...]
>
> The point is; When is a 'bit hot' for you and me, deadly to the old and infirm? 20'C, 25'C, 28'C, 17'C over night?

We need to stop banging on about old people. I'm arguing about warnings, not effects.
estivoautumnal - on 18 Jul 2013
In reply to DancingOnRock:
> (In reply to estivoautumnal)
> [...]
>
> No. A bit of ice isn't a problem for a huge proportion of the population. Most of us can deal with it without incident.
>

No, most of us can not deal with a bit of ice.

DancingOnRock - on 18 Jul 2013
In reply to estivoautumnal:
> (In reply to DancingOnRock)
> [...]
> Yes. But is the forecast on its own not enough? Does a warning need to accompany it?

They do it all over the world. If it wasn't needed and didn't save lives they wouldn't do it.
anonymouse - on 18 Jul 2013
In reply to estivoautumnal:
> Yes. But is the forecast on its own not enough? Does a warning need to accompany it?

Just think about the logistics of it...
freerangecat - on 18 Jul 2013
In reply to estivoautumnal:

ok, sorry, misunderstood your argument. I agree with the need for the warning though. it is there for those people/businesses/hospitals/whatever who need it, and for whom the warning triggers certain actions, preparations etc. if you don't need it, ignore it.
JJL - on 18 Jul 2013
In reply to Oceanrower:

A&E is overflowing - mostly frail elderly who haven't kept properly hydrated.

The problem isn't the met office warning, it's the reporting of the warnign rathe than the contents of the warning.
DancingOnRock - on 18 Jul 2013
In reply to JJL:
> (In reply to Oceanrower)
>
> A&E is overflowing - mostly frail elderly who haven't kept properly hydrated.
>
> The problem isn't the met office warning, it's the reporting of the warnign rathe than the contents of the warning.

I don't think so. It's widely known what to do when it's hot. Which is kind of oceanrower and other's point. The problem is either people forget advice, ignore advice or just can't cope. That's what the level 3 warning is there to catch. The aftermath of people who despite taking precautions still get into trouble.

dissonance - on 18 Jul 2013
In reply to estivoautumnal:

> Yes. But is the forecast on its own not enough? Does a warning need to accompany it?

you did see the bit about differing definitions depending on the area?
Why make people waste time looking up the definitions when they can get it nice and easy.
crossdressingrodney - on 19 Jul 2013
In reply to Jon Dittman:

What kind of tax breaks incentivised people to die earlier/later (excluding that guy in the restaurant at the end of the universe)?

Also I can't help think that incentivising people to get married is based on a confusion between correlation and causation.
the real slim shady - on 19 Jul 2013
In reply to Oceanrower: The Met Office issuing these warnings etc causes certain services to be required to plan for extra care/monitoring/other stuff to be done. It's basically just a way of ensuring social and healthcare services look after vulnerable sectors of society.

Hope you understand this!! and that it helps. :)
ice.solo - on 19 Jul 2013
In reply to Oceanrower:

As a kid school was closed if it hit 35c. We used to pray for it.
Happened maybe 4 or 5 times a summer, so we went to the beach, where we would see every other kid and all the teachers too.

We even once had a school trip to some water slides cancelled due to heat - so everyone went to the beach. The joke was on us that time.
teflonpete - on 19 Jul 2013
In reply to estivoautumnal:
> (In reply to freerangecat)
>
> Not my argument. I am simply saying that if it's forecast for 30 degrees do we need a warning saying it will be 30 degrees? Surely the fact that is forecast is enough.

A forecast of 30 degrees for a day or two is a forecast for a couple of warm days. Bung a couple of beers in the fridge and enjoy.

A forecast of 30 degrees for a few consecutive days with high overnight temperatures causes accumulation problems, particularly in cities where the fabric of the built environment works like a storage heater and prevents overnight cooling.

It is the forecast of high temperatures for a number of consecutive days that triggers a heatwave warning.


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