/ Carnmore - Poolewe approach.

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Jamie B - on 18 Jul 2013
Is it possible to drive as far as Kernsary? And is a MTB much use beyond there?
victim of mathematics - on 18 Jul 2013
In reply to Jamie B:

Not unless anything's changed much in recent years. Not sure about biking beyond that. I seem to remember much of the path along the side of Fionn Loch is good, so maybe.
smac - on 18 Jul 2013
In reply to Jamie B: The gates are normally open but you are not allowed to park at Kernsary without permission. You can park close to Inveran logde about a mile from Poolewe but the spots are for fishing on the Ewe so probably not good for a long stay. It's a fairly straightforward bike in from Poolewe if you have moderate bike skills. Some single track and drainage ditchs are the worst you'll encounter. It's a lovely ride even with camping/climbing kit, about 1hr 30min - 2hrs from Poolewe.
Simon Caldwell - on 18 Jul 2013
In reply to smac:
I'm a crap biker and managed to cycle (with camping and climbing kit) as far as the end of the woods after Kernsary. The next section was rather boggy, but it's not far until the new path which would again be cyclable by the vaguely competent (ie not me). But the path's a fast walk anyway. Took us 3 1/2 leisurely hours.
jon on 18 Jul 2013
In reply to Jamie B:

Not really relevant, but I climbed on Carnmore sometime in the 70s. There were only two other climbers there, one of which had walked in in his rock boots! Can't remember the make, but they weren't quite the tight shoes of today!
davidbeynon - on 18 Jul 2013
In reply to Jamie B:

I was there last year, walking in. You could easily get a bike as far as the woods, but I probably wouldn't bother taking it far beyond that point as the path isn't quite so good afterwards.

The bothy actually has beds with mattresses, they are pretty grotty but I got away with a groundsheet. There are mice too, so hang up your food!

What routes do you have your eye on?
Simon Caldwell - on 18 Jul 2013
In reply to davidbeynon:
> The bothy actually has beds with mattresses

http://climbing.me.uk/Achnasheen/Fisherfield%20Four/slides/P1080318.html
davidbeynon - on 18 Jul 2013
In reply to Toreador:

Hmm. Mattresses seem to have gone. When I was there it looked more like this: http://www.spectral3d.co.uk/Personal/pics/2012/jubilee_june_2012/jubilee/dsc_2674_jpg.jpeg.html
Simon Caldwell - on 18 Jul 2013
In reply to davidbeynon:
That was a year after our visit - looks like they've given the place a makeover!
davidbeynon - on 18 Jul 2013
In reply to Toreador:

My guess is they replaced the beds in the house and couldn't be bothered with carting the old ones all the way out and disposing of them. Bit of a win for the bothy though.
a lakeland climber on 18 Jul 2013
In reply to Jamie B:

Supposedly the estate only allows mountain bikes on the driveable tracks. These end at the edge of the woodland about a mile past Kernsary. However I've seen an MTB parked up at Strathan Buidhe near where the path comes in from the Letterewe Hotel.

If you could arrange a boat across Loch Maree then the path from the hotel direct to the causeway is possibly the quickest way in. There's decent camping near to the bothy as well.

ALC

Gary Latter - on 18 Jul 2013
In reply toa lakeland climber:
"Supposedly the estate only allows mountain bikes on the driveable tracks. These end at the edge of the woodland about a mile past Kernsary."
As the new path was built & paid for with public money, don't see how they could possibly have any objection to using mountain bikes - it's a hardcore path. They also use the path with horses bringing out slaughtered stags in the shooting season. Mountain bikes clearly do a lot less damage than laden horses, so they can't possibly try to justify this on the grounds of damage to the path!?
I recall a bizarre incident when was cycling in there back in 1999 with my wife. Just past the forest, on the new path, cycled past the proprietor & her husband, along with 2 kids. When wife followed, say 100m behind, she had to get off & push the bike past kids sitting on the path! What was that all about?
Have seen some recent posts on Facebook about folk nipping in & out for the day on bikes, and taking bikes most of the way in.
Jamie B - on 18 Jul 2013
In reply to Gary Latter:

That'd what I wanted to hear, shame the bike is being shared!
Nigel Thomson - on 18 Jul 2013
In reply to Jamie B: Shots each or a backie? Rider with sac of course.
Jamie B - on 18 Jul 2013
In reply to the weegy:

Shots each.. but I think I get it to myself on the ride out!
isi_o - on 18 Jul 2013
In reply to Jamie B:
If I can ride it - I'm still not convinced! You might yet get it to yourself in both directions... I do have really *very* short legs.
Jamie B - on 18 Jul 2013
In reply to isi_o:

At very least I can drive you to Kernsary and drop off my own bag, before going back to park car and jump on bike.
In reply to Jamie B:
I am a local - this is the current position. No vehicles beyond Poolewe. You can bike as far as the end of the woods past Kernsary but are asked not to take bikes on footpath beyond this. It's an excellent path the whole way to the causeway at the Dubh Loch/Fionn Loch. Makes for fast walking.
Gary Latter - on 19 Jul 2013
In reply to The Watch of Barrisdale:

"this is the current position. No vehicles beyond Poolewe. You can bike as far as the end of the woods past Kernsary but are asked not to take bikes on footpath beyond this. It's an excellent path the whole way to the causeway at the Dubh Loch/Fionn Loch."

I still maintain that there should be no reason not to cycle in as far as you can on a decent hardcore path. Mountain bikes do no more damage than walking in my opinion, and substantially less than the estate ponies/horses.

Kinda reminds me of the time was stopped when cycling along the land rover track towards Derry Lodge in Cairngorms, when ranger in land rover pulled over & had discussion along the lines of "we're trying to discourage the use of bikes and encourage the long walk approach". Needless to say, I didn't pay much heed - he didn't seem to appreciate the hypocrisy and ridiculousness of the situation. People have been using bikes to cycle into the hills and cliffs for years, right from the earliest days of exploration around the turn of the last century. There's not all that many places where a bike is a real advantage to get into the big mountain cliffs, but for the likes of the Southern & Eastern Cairngorms, Binnein Shuas, Foinaven, Creag Dubh Dibidale, and of course Carnmore, it makes perfect sense.
Fester - on 19 Jul 2013
In reply to Jamie B:

I`m no mountain biker by any strech of the imagination but I took mine in to Strathan Buidhe last month without any problem.After that I think you would be just as quick walking. The stretch through the forest was a bit muddy on a few sections.Great run back out :)
Nigel Thomson - on 19 Jul 2013
In reply to Jamie B: well that's not so bad. What do you fancy, the impeccable Fionn Buttress or the Hard Rock ticks? Or perhaps them all? Now that would be a trip to remember. Well worth the logistics of getting there and I know you appreciate the sum of all parts Jamie.
Jamie B - on 19 Jul 2013
In reply to the weegy:

Did Fionn Buttress a few years back - impeccable indeed. Looking at Gob via Black Mischief this time around, unless it turns out to be too hot! If so then Beinn Lair might turn out to be a trump card. I also rate Maiden Buttress highly, possibly the most beautiful setting I've ever climbed in.
Nigel Thomson - on 19 Jul 2013
In reply to Jamie B: Have a great time whatever you do, Gob is fantastic but things are hotting up out there already.


Jamie B - on 20 Jul 2013
In reply to the weegy:

> Gob is fantastic but things are hotting up out there already.

Oh yes. Glad we didn't do the preamble route or any more than 3 pitches in today's heat! My take on the path (beyond the woods) is that it's only really ride-able for the first mile or so unless you have better bike skills or a lighter bag than me.

WilliamBurnside - on 21 Jul 2013
In reply to The Watch of Barrisdale:

The Scottish Outdoor Access Code surely means that it is possible to ride your bike anywhere on tracks and paths in Scotland. The Estate can ask but have no legal right to stop you biking on their land....or am I wrong?
ads.ukclimbing.com
In reply to WilliamBurnside:
I said " you are asked" - that's all it is- a request . My own view is that - if you don't cause damage - biking is OK.
I am opposed to large private land ownership in Scotland - but the situation is as it is - some ordinary guys and their families who I know work on the estate- not many jobs in our neck of the woods.

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