/ tips for coiling ropes

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Lukem6 - on 09 Sep 2013
What techniques do you all use for coiling your ropes and not getting tangles?


Especially for when moving in the hills/mountains

Tom F Harding on 09 Sep 2013
In reply to Lukem6:

Put a quarter twist into the rope with your fingers as you make each loop - It stops the rope twisting and thus tangling.
GridNorth - on 09 Sep 2013
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WfvioMwTVUo

It takes a few seconds longer than the way most people coil but it saves time when climbing as the rope just comes off the top without all that faff you get the "preferred" way.
muppetfilter - on 09 Sep 2013
In reply to GridNorth: Thats a massively complicated way of doing it and getting your neck filthy at the same time. Easier just to run the rope alternately over your hand.
GrahamD - on 09 Sep 2013
In reply to GridNorth:

I climbed with someone who used that method the other day (I watched as I'd finished coiling my rope after he got half way through). It seemed to give no benefit whatsover.

Moreover the finish is a lot neater if you don't put the ends through the bite you took through the coils. Instead, just loop the bite over the coils and pull snug. The resultant shape sits much flatter against the back
highclimber - on 09 Sep 2013
In reply to Lukem6: I always coil with one strand unless I'm lugging it down from the top of a climb. when I come to use it, I always flake it out as it's never running free when you dump it on the ground.

The reason some people get twists in their mountaineer's coils is because they're not taking the natural twist in the rope out when they take coils.

highclimber - on 09 Sep 2013
In reply to GrahamD:
> Moreover the finish is a lot neater if you don't put the ends through the bite you took through the coils. Instead, just loop the bite over the coils and pull snug. The resultant shape sits much flatter against the back


I do this too. You have permission to coil my ropes if ever we go climbing!
Rick Graham on 09 Sep 2013
In reply to highclimber:

> The reason some people get twists in their mountaineer's coils is because they're not taking the natural twist in the rope out when they take coils.

Spot on.

I take both ends. Two armspans plus a foot, then twelve armspans lapped in hand for a 50m rope, four loops round and finish off. Tie round back and look for descent route. Just like gridnorth :-)
GridNorth - on 09 Sep 2013
In reply to Lukem6: I have always really struggled with holding the rope in the hand partly because I have small hands but each to their own. I also find that unless you cross in opposite directions for each coil it does not relax the rope. I just like the fact that the rope is ready to go as you lay it down so time lost coiling is gained at this point. I don't find it complicated in the slightest, I watched it once and did it right every time after that. I have some sympathy with the knot issue but I only knot my ropes when descending. I normally hold it in place with a belcro strap.

To GrahamD: I agree at that stage there is no benefit but it's far easier and quicker when you are ready to climb.
Rick Graham on 09 Sep 2013
In reply to Rick Graham:

b**ger. Simu posting. Similar to GN, but not quite.
Toerag - on 09 Sep 2013
In reply to Lukem6: Graham D has the correct way to finish the coils. It also makes the rope sit higher on your back which helps it not get stuck when you're descending a groove on your backside. The video is interesting as I've always done the 'stretch your arms out and flip it behind your head' method.

In terms of ropes and twists, they're like cables. Cables get coiled in figures of 8 on the ground if you can't impart the quarter twist in them.

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