/ Do British 7+ technical moves exist?

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aln - on 28 Sep 2013
How technical can moves get? Standard moves, reach pull stand up. Then side pull lay back, rockover, Gaston Egyptian so on. But it seems to me from my vast experience of never climbing anything harder than 6b that in the higher tech grades it stops being about technique and more about how strong you are.
ian Ll-J - on 28 Sep 2013
In reply to aln: Some very technical moves on slabs in the (British Tech grade) 7's, where technique is far more important than strength.
aln - on 28 Sep 2013
In reply to ian Ll-J: In what way? What are those techniques?
ian Ll-J - on 28 Sep 2013
In reply to aln: I'm no expert but have climbed The Medium on the Slate which has a tech 7a move and have also climbed all the moves on The Very big and the Very Small which has two 7a moves.

I'm not sure how to begin describing those moves other than to say a lot of problem solving, lateral thinking and also some very subtle body movements. I guess you also have to trust your feet on very miniscule edges and be able to crimp on razors.
ian Ll-J - on 28 Sep 2013
In reply to aln: Forgot to mention accuracy / precision and timing...and lots of patience.
aln - on 28 Sep 2013
In reply to ian Ll-J:
> (In reply to aln)
> 4
> I'm not sure how to begin describing those moves other than to say a lot of problem solving, lateral thinking and also some very subtle body movements. I guess you also have to trust your feet on very miniscule edges and be able to crimp on razors.

I get the former part of your post but doesn't the latter come down to strength again?
MJ - on 28 Sep 2013
In reply to aln:

Ben Moon: "Technique is no substitute for power".
aln - on 28 Sep 2013
In reply to MJ:
> (In reply to aln)
>
> Ben Moon: "Technique is no substitute for power".

From Hard Grit? He was one of the fannybaws who started using the word power instead of strength.
smithaldo - on 28 Sep 2013
In reply to aln: but power is the better descriptor isn't it? that's why the guys on world's strongest man would be terrible climbers.
Marek - on 28 Sep 2013
In reply to smithaldo:
> (In reply to aln) but power is the better descriptor isn't it? that's why the guys on world's strongest man would be terrible climbers.

Not really. You're thinking of their power-to-weight ratio. Strength is what allows you to hang from a mono. Power is what allows you to then dyno from it to the next hold.
ian Ll-J - on 28 Sep 2013
In reply to aln: When you get the technique right on a slab move, there's very little power or strength required. Though admittedly whilst working the moves i.e. before getting the technique sorted you have to crank like a demon...well I did on the Medium anyway....but once sorted the moves become less dependant on strength.
Jonny2vests - on 28 Sep 2013
In reply to aln:

I've often thought about this. I don't thing strength (or power, I like power) and technique are mutually exclusive, some techniques require strength and might simply involve doing what you might do on a VS, but with smaller holds and at steeper angles.
plyometrics - on 28 Sep 2013
In reply to MJ:
> (In reply to aln)
>
> Ben Moon: "Technique is no substitute for power".

Relevant until Le Menestrel pissed all over Brad Pit second go...

Lord_ash2000 - on 28 Sep 2013
In reply to aln: It's all about the tolerances for the movements and positions. The amount of power / strength you have may widen those tolerances a little or even a lot. For example if you are out of balance a little because you're feet are wrong if you can just bone down on crimp super hard and lock it down it'll compensate and you'll make the move. Where as someone far weaker couldn't do that, they would have to get their balance and weight distribution much closer to the perfect mark in order to pull off the move.

On hard routes the tolerances are very fine, and often the amount of power you have won't be enough to make much difference or the with slabs the angle makes pulling power almost redundant altogether as they may be no meaning full holds or in fact by the nature of it you may be pushing and palming your way up.

So in short there is no upper limit really on how technical a move can be. It may be possible but require a very exact set of movements to stay on the rock with almost no room for error and being on the very limits of what the friction and your shoes will support.


DubyaJamesDubya - on 28 Sep 2013
In reply to Lord_ash2000:
>
> So in short there is no upper limit really on how technical a move can be. It may be possible but require a very exact set of movements to stay on the rock with almost no room for error and being on the very limits of what the friction and your shoes will support.

Well put. Although I would have thought this pretty obvious if the original poster gave it some thought.
Hay - on 28 Sep 2013
In reply to plyometrics:
See also Micky Page on Monk Life ...
aln - on 28 Sep 2013
In reply to DubyaJamesDubya:
> (In reply to Lord_ash2000)
> [...]
>
> Well put. Although I would have thought this pretty obvious if the original poster gave it some thought.

Maybe the original poster has given it some thought and decided he'd ask some people who climb harder than him for their thoughts. Out of interest, for fun.
Kevin Woods - on 28 Sep 2013
In reply to aln: Well said
aln - on 28 Sep 2013
In reply to Hay:
> (In reply to plyometrics)
> See also Micky Page on Monk Life ...

What does that mean?
Hay - on 28 Sep 2013
In reply to aln:
In response to the previous poster own response to power/technique comment.
Mikey Page climbed Monk Life 15 times in one day. Mikey page is not exactly weak but that takes more than just power.
Sorry Aln, bit of a hijack tbh.
Bruce
ads.ukclimbing.com
alasdair19 on 28 Sep 2013
In reply to aln: for context monk life took Malcolm smith and Andy earl ages. Gaskins in a session. Other repeats?
aln - on 28 Sep 2013
In reply to Hay: I know Monk Life. 15 times? Fcuk me that's impressive. I don't know his name, unsung hero?
aln - on 28 Sep 2013
In reply to alasdair19: Isn't it basically pull onto the rock then dyno? Does that require technique or strength and luck?
aln - on 28 Sep 2013
In reply to aln: Just watched a video of Monk Life. Ha ha just pull on and dyno right enough. Not even a full dyno ;)
Hay - on 28 Sep 2013
In reply to aln:
Unsung(ish) on here but pretty well known bouldery-type. He's in Life on Hold along with other futuristically guid youths (Dan Varian, Ned Fehally).
DubyaJamesDubya - on 29 Sep 2013
In reply to aln:
> (In reply to DubyaJamesDubya)
> [...]
>
> Maybe the original poster has given it some thought and decided he'd ask some people who climb harder than him for their thoughts. Out of interest, for fun.

Maybe. We live in an analogue world.
Your point?

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