/ Using work gloves for climbing.

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baileyswalk - on 06 Oct 2013
Heard a lot of talk about people using joiners/labouers gloves or even Norweigan bin man gloves as a cheap alternative to branded gloves. Just wondering if anyone had any recommendations? I would still use my branded gloves when cold but otherwise I was thinking a liner and these might do the job:http://www.directbrandtools.com/Detail.asp?qsFullScr=Yes&qsProd=223602632
In reply to baileyswalk: If they are unlined don't expect them to be particularly warm. In cold temperatures I've tried similar and they can work well for technical mixed climbing and the like but only short routes where you can lower off and get mitts back on sharpish! I've also found the cheaper ones tend to fall apart quite quickly and soak up water.

My favourite 'cheapish' (20 normally) gloves for most winter things but actual climbing are the marmot basic work gloves. Short review http://www.redbull.com/en/adventure/stories/1331590661213/marmot-basic-work-glove longer one on my blog http://lightfromthenorth.blogspot.fi/2012/10/marmot-basic-work-glove-review.html
Milesy - on 06 Oct 2013
Brendan, remember how cold it was on Taxus earlier in the year - what was it -25 with wind chill or something? I had those cheap cold temperature working gloves on that day. They were designed for Arctic or Canadian fishermen or something and are used for working in cold storage areas etc as well.
In reply to baileyswalk: I used Skytech Argon gloves all last winter, and honestly, they were fantstic!

http://www.arco.co.uk/products/14G4800/147422/Skytec%26reg%3B+Argon+Thermal+Gloves

I also have a pair of lined leather 'drivers' gloves, which I use for the walk in, but swap to the Argon's for the climbing
andyd1970 - on 06 Oct 2013
In reply to baileyswalk: I have used the Skytech argons but didn't find them any better than my normal winter gloves(they are a lot cheaper though). I now use them for doing DIY and gardening in the winter and they are great. The bin man Gloves are the called "Chamonix bin man Gloves" as that is where they were first used.

Here is a review on them both and a blog.

http://scottishmountaineer.com/gloves-that-dont-cost-an-arm.
http://www.kernowklimber.co.uk/blog/2013/03/05/Crazy-Times.aspx

hope this helps
skarabrae - on 06 Oct 2013
In reply to baileyswalk: i work in construction & i suffer from quite bad raynauds (vibration white finger), the subject of using work gloves for winter climbing comes up quite often on this site.
ive tried em all!, i now use work gloves for work....thats what theyre designed for & work best at.
i use winter climbing gloves for.... winter climbing, thats what they`re designed for & are best at.
Andrew Mallinson - on 06 Oct 2013
In reply to baileyswalk:

Hiya,

I use these...

http://www.briersltd.co.uk/gardening-gloves-1/workwear-gloves/general-worker.html

...and have a pair of extremities mitts for putting on at stances/afterwards. These Briers gloves have excellent textured rubber which means you don't have to tape the shafts for double handers....
ANdy
puppythedog on 06 Oct 2013
In reply to baileyswalk: I tried the argon gloves in Italy in January. They weren't up to it and i needed to borrow a friends spare set-up. Not delicate enough for sorting out belays and they didn't protect me from the cold which admittedly was bloody cold at minus 20 at times.
Trangia - on 06 Oct 2013
In reply to baileyswalk:

I used leather fingerless sailing gloves to stop myself getting metal splinters on via ferrata.
Tim Sparrow on 06 Oct 2013
In reply to baileyswalk: Have used part rubber surfaced builders gloves in the Alps - they were great for a while. However, fingers and hands became damp through sweat (rubber is not breathable) and then got quite cold. So, certainly a cheap alternative but designed gloves do the job better!
George Ormerod - on 07 Oct 2013
In reply to Cookie (North East Wales MC):

I've used similar and down to -20C and they were pretty shite. They weren't up to the 4k cycle home and were rubbish for climbing in. Dachstiens were a much better bet; assuming you can do what you need to with them. They are good in that you can buy 10 pairs and have lots of dry pairs, but that's about it.
Erstwhile on 07 Oct 2013
In reply to baileyswalk:

I used posh gloves for a while then switched to leather work gloves with thinsulate lining - cost 10 euro ! I sprayed the work gloves to improve waterproofing, so you could add that small extra cost.

As far as I can tell any serious gloves are fine until they get wet and then they are pretty useless.
Perhaps the work gloves are slightly more prone to getting sodden, but if you carry a spare pair (a good idea in any case) then it's fine.

A friend told me that he once bought some very expensive gloves from a very well known brand. They rapidly disintegrated to reveal that the insulation was bubble plastic ! Now bubble platic may be fine, but charging a hunderd pounds for it seems a tad saucy.
NottsRich on 07 Oct 2013
In reply to Cookie (North East Wales MC):
> (In reply to baileyswalk) I used Skytech Argon gloves all last winter, and honestly, they were fantstic!


They are great, but take days to dry out. I'd use them (+ a spare of the same) for a Scottish day out, then drying them when I got home took at least 2 or 3 days in the airing cupboard. Not recommended if you are doing more than a one day trip.
Jim C - on 07 Oct 2013
In reply to NottsRich:
> (In reply to Cookie (North East Wales MC))
> [...]
>
>
> They are great, but take days to dry out. I'd use them (+ a spare of the same) for a Scottish day out, then drying them when I got home took at least 2 or 3 days in the airing cupboard. Not recommended if you are doing more than a one day trip.

Ideal for Skye, after watching my mate trash a new pair of decent gloves scrambling, the cheap rubberised gloves are a no brainer disposable alternative, so even if you only get one day and bin them.
edunn on 07 Oct 2013
In reply to Cookie (North East Wales MC):

That's a +1 for the Argons. I use them for mixed and also for cycling in the winter.

They're a bit 'sticky' (the rubber is very harsh), which means ropes and hardware don't glide through your hand as easily, but you get used to this after a while.
Milesy - on 07 Oct 2013
Here is the other thread from last year.

http://www.ukclimbing.com/forums/t.php?t=521930

The Argons (called Ninja Ice gloves in North America) seem to divide people - maybe its whether the glove fits so to speak...? A couple of guides swear by them including Ron Walker (see thread), who are out all season in them.
Jim Fraser - on 07 Oct 2013
In reply to baileyswalk:

I have a pair of Tesco 10 leather gloves that have survived lots of winter use but are in the process of falling apart. They seem to be good quality leather with a thin and robust fleece lining and work amazingly well. Most cheap gloves have cotton linings and therefore are useless in the cold.

I seem to recall that 'bin man gloves' were an essential part of Mal Duff's first ascent of Point Blank, with Jon Tinker's alpine bin-man experience appearing to inspire the glove solution after his contribution on as previous attempt.

Ordinary work gloves often have a rough leather finish that will frost up and tend to grip icy rocks. The cotton content can be a problem but wearing polyprop inners usually work well. I have used that combination for working in freezing conditions including on generators on hill-tops in -12C and it is quite effective.
Dave Perry - on 07 Oct 2013
In reply to baileyswalk:

I work outside in all weathers a drystone waller and have used the Skytech argons. Following a previous thread I took a new pair to Scotland last winter. They were just warm enough but scrambling around with ice axe on a mixed climbs they soon started to get damp from sweat. Once I cooled down so did my hands. Luckily i took the precautions of having my normal winter gloves with me and ended up wearing them.

They are hard to dryout but at home I have the advantage of central heating/radiators!

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