/ Warning No Climbing Gear in hand luggage on French flights!

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chris smith - on 17 Oct 2013
Hi all
Just a warning Me and my friends were all recently stopped at the airport scanners and told it was illegal to bring any climbing equipment on the plane in Hand luggage. We were flying back from Nice airport last week. We were lucky in that we could go back and had to check one bag in with all of our climbing stuff into the main hold, this should have cost 30euro but easyjet let us off with this.
However not so lucky was a guy catching a flight to Berlin who isn't have time to check his luggage and lost 12 quick draws. This is the first time this has happened to me and it certainly wasn't a problem travelling out of the UK. Only on the return flight.
Just a heads up incase your heading out.
IPPurewater on 17 Oct 2013
In reply to chris smith:

I'm not surprised.

I haven't tried to take hardwear in my hand luggage for over ten years, having had it refused several times, back then.
Dave Garnett - on 17 Oct 2013
In reply to IPPurewater:

I was allowed to take a slackline out through Liverpool a couple of months ago, they looked at it, swabbed for explosives (because disguising it in something that's bound to be checked is the obvious way to transport explosive, right?) and said it was fine.

However it was a different story coming back through Carcassonne. There they pointed out how it was the obvious thing to use with deadly effect in hand to hand combat and made me take it out of my hand luggage.

Worse, this was Ryanair and so it cost me 60 Euros to check it in as an extra piece of luggage.
Simon Caldwell - on 17 Oct 2013
In reply to chris smith:
You've been fortunate to get away with it in the UK.
It's really not worth the risk, put it all in the hold.
LeeWood - on 17 Oct 2013
In reply to chris smith: I took harness with screwgates & reverso Carcassonne - Liverpool - Bristol - Toulouse no probs in Sept. I was apprehensive and left out my progger. Was more surprised on return to be permitted a sizeable piece of glass - as part of a framed picture.
Jonny2vests - on 17 Oct 2013
In reply to chris smith:

Do you fly much? It's not illegal, but it is a fairly well established rule since 911.
Steve Wakeford - on 17 Oct 2013
In reply to chris smith: hey chris. I have flown with climbing gear a lot recently including to France. I have found that they have an issue with slings and spikey stuff and heavy stuff on string like hexes. Apart from that I never have a problem. I take all
the biners (including the ones from my quick draws) and cams, put them in a plastic bag at inside my hand luggage. This normally accounts for most of the weight. If I get stopped in the future I'll post but this has always worked.
Michael Gordon - on 17 Oct 2013
In reply to Steve Wakeford:

Rope is obviously a no-no. I had a feeling nuts etc (i.e. most of the rack) weren't allowed as I remember being frustrated that all the heaviest stuff basically has to go in the hold, thereby defeating the main point of hand luggage!
Simon Caldwell - on 17 Oct 2013
In reply to Steve Wakeford:
and if you do a forum search you'll see that it's not uncommon for people to have krabs, gear, even harnesses, rejected by security. Yes, you can risk it, and probably get away with it. But if you're challenged then if there's time you can pay for extra baggage to check them in; if there isn't time then at best you've got no gear for your holiday.
Personally I go for the safe option and check it all in.
PM on 17 Oct 2013
In reply to Michael Gordon: I did not realise that the main point of hand luggage was carrying all your heavy items. I feel enlightened.
AG - on 17 Oct 2013
In reply to PM: in over 12 years flying I've never had a problem with taking ropes, crabs, slings etc in hand luggage. Had a problem once with an ice axe in the hold baggage. ..had to unpack it on the side of the runway and show the police that it wasn't a gun! ..I only really fly to Italy mind.
Michael Gordon - on 17 Oct 2013
In reply to PM:

Of course! Doesn't matter how heavy hand luggage is, it's weight you don't have to pay for (provided you can get it into a stupidly small bag size).

(at least that was the case a few years ago)
Michael Gordon - on 17 Oct 2013
In reply to AG:

I wasn't allowed the rope - you could tie up folk with it. I imagine slings would be the same argument.
pamph - on 17 Oct 2013
In reply to chris smith: I've just returned from a week in Mallorca and took my harness (with chalk bag and Sticht plate), quickdraws and rock boots in my hand luggage. I've done this for the past seven or eight years to Mallorca and Spain, the theory being that if my luggage gets lost, I can still get some climbing done, providing my mates rope arrives in the hold baggage. I have never had problem flying from several Scottish airports and back.
Andy Say - on 17 Oct 2013
In reply to AG:
> (In reply to PM) Had a problem once with an ice axe in the hold baggage. ..had to unpack it on the side of the runway and show the police that it wasn't a gun! ..I only really fly to Italy mind.

I had that in Pakistan. And its amazing how much like an artillery round a SIG bottle looks like on X-ray!
Enty - on 17 Oct 2013
ha ha you take a rope in your hand luggage to save weight and complain when they make a fuss? WTF?

E
Wiley Coyote - on 17 Oct 2013
In reply to chris smith:
It's all random and seems to depend on the whim of the person on your scanner. I've seen a bloke have a biro confiscated because it could be used to stab someone while a women at the next scanner had two pointed looking chopsticks in an elaborate hair-do and went through no probs. Ropes etc can be used to tie people up, krabs as knuckle dusters etc etc. To be on the safe side I put everything but rock shoes and harness in the hold. The security may be abitrary and silly but you can't argue with a jobsworth in authority.
All that said, I went through the scanner at Kos last week with my keys, coins and phoine in my pocket and wearing my belt and it didn't even beep. Mrs C had forgotten she had bottle of water in her bag but it was not picked up by the security crew either.
estivoautumnal - on 17 Oct 2013
In reply to chris smith:

That's budget airlines for you. The full price f*ckers aren't much better. No nuts allowed but if you fly business or 1st class then have a sharp knife to cut your beef sir.
estivoautumnal - on 17 Oct 2013
In reply to Wiley Coyote:

I flew a domestic flight in Mozambique last year where the x-ray scanner didn't work and the guy was just pretending to look at the screen. Everybody could see the screen was broken so he gave up after a few minutes. I was even allowed to take a bottle of beer through security and onto the aircraft.
Jon Read - on 18 Oct 2013
In reply to estivoautumnal:
They are not sharp, and the beef is overdone, im sorry to report.
ads.ukclimbing.com
TommyC on 18 Oct 2013
In reply to Michael Gordon:

It's 10 kilos for hand luggage but you can take a reasonable size rucksack. I took a packed 45 litre rucksack on a flight to Egypt a few weeks back.
metal arms on 18 Oct 2013
In reply to PM:
> (In reply to Michael Gordon) I did not realise that the main point of hand luggage was carrying all your heavy items. I feel enlightened.

Brilliant!
Neil Williams - on 18 Oct 2013
In reply to TommyC:

Depends on the airline, easyJet don't have a weight limit, but in practice you're going to have to put some pretty heavy stuff in your bag to go much over 10kg (a large, well over hand luggage size trolley case full of stuff like books only came to 17kg).

Neil
Simon Caldwell - on 18 Oct 2013
In reply to estivoautumnal:
> That's budget airlines for you

No it isn't. It's airport security who make the decision, nothing to do with the airline. Liverpool in particular have a reputation for being pedantic (I've seen harnesses being rejected as you could use them to tie someone up - but belts and neck ties are fine).
Dave Garnett - on 18 Oct 2013
In reply to Jonny2vests:
> (In reply to chris smith)
>
> Do you fly much? It's not illegal, but it is a fairly well established rule since 911.

I fly a lot but this was unusual because it was Ryanair with a strict weight limit (for checked and hand laggage) that we were struggling with and putting the slackline in my hand luggage helped even the weight out.

I won't be doing it again, but then I avoid Ryanair on principle unless there's absolutely no alternative anyway.
TeeBee on 18 Oct 2013
In reply to Wiley Coyote:

> you can't argue with a jobsworth in authority

You can spend happy hours on the flight fantasising about it though. I managed to entertain myself on a flight from Milan trying to work out how I could have persuaded them to let my family-sized jar of italian Nutella through.
The best I came up with was eat it all in front of the security gate, then throw up on them.
ewar woowar on 18 Oct 2013
In reply to chris smith:

Until fairly recently I frequently flew with about 30 long cable-ties in my laptop bag until I checked a less-used pocket and took them out.

Must have taken them on over a dozen flights!

Anyone on this flight need "Quick-cuffing"?
pamph - on 18 Oct 2013
In reply to chris smith: Just as an aside, last year I read an article in Private Eye's 'Funny Old World' column which told the story from a newspaper in New Zealand. On a flight somewhere in Africa (I think) a guy was sitting in his seat waiting for take-off when he realised that he could smell petrol. As an aircraft engineer, he realised that he wasn't smelling aviation fuel as that is basically parafin. There was liquid dripping from the overhead locker above him and when he called a steward to check it out, they found a bag in the locker leaking petrol. On opening the bag, they found it contained a chainsaw. When the guy who owned the bag came forward, he said that he was allowed through security because a chainsaw wasn't on the list of things to disallow on the flight!
This story was in Private Eye, believe me, but I can't vouch for it's truth!
HB1 - on 18 Oct 2013
In reply to Wiley Coyote: I came back from Barcelona yesterday, and I've only today realised that I had my little first aid hill kit in my hand . luggage, including scissors and a Swiss army knife. They must have shown clearly on the screen
escudoturbo - on 18 Oct 2013
In reply to chris smith: Airport security depends entirely on the person operating the x-ray or doing the inspection. I spent 18 months working in a UK airport and had to go through the x-ray and metal detector everytime i passed landside to airside despite having a top level security pass; one security chap went through my toolbox ignoring a stanly knfe and screwdrivers but declaring a drill-bit 'prety lethal'.
I also saw a security guard want to search an armed member of special-branch and not know what to do when he refused.
For private travel I would always err on the side of caution as you never know who's going to be making the descision on your luggage.
timjones - on 19 Oct 2013
In reply to estivoautumnal:
> (In reply to chris smith)
>
> That's budget airlines for you. The full price f*ckers aren't much better. No nuts allowed but if you fly business or 1st class then have a sharp knife to cut your beef sir.

Security don't bother to check which airline you're flying with, they apply the same standards to everyone.
Offwidth - on 19 Oct 2013
In reply to HB1: airport x ray scanners produce a 2D image of the contents of your bag with no depth cues whatsoever. This makes the already difficult task of focussing on the visual content of a monitor even more so. I work with folk who have had working 3D x-ray systems for 20 years ( demo'ed back then on tomorrows world) that allows you to rotate the x ray image on a standard monitor and see dangerous stuff that looks harmless in the 2D image and the rotation puts back key depth cues. When your airport makes you queue for an hour and get half undressed for your safety remember they haven't bothered to install such technology.
r0x0r.wolfo - on 19 Oct 2013
In reply to Michael Gordon:
> (In reply to PM)
>
> Of course! Doesn't matter how heavy hand luggage is, it's weight you don't have to pay for (provided you can get it into a stupidly small bag size).
>
> (at least that was the case a few years ago)

Not on ryanair, they weight your hand luggage. Got stung 60 quid about a month ago.
Michael Gordon - on 19 Oct 2013
In reply to r0x0r.wolfo:

Yes the situation may have changed for some airlines since I last went abroad. That doesn't surprise me about Ryanair.
In reply to r0x0r.wolfo:
>
>
> Not on ryanair, they weight your hand luggage. Got stung 60 quid about a month ago.

Few back yesterday from Carcassonne to East Midlands with Ryanair; less than 15 each and they didn't weigh our hand-luggage. Presumably your bag was over the prescribed limit so what did you expect?

Chris
Dave Garnett - on 19 Oct 2013
In reply to Chris Craggs:

They did weigh some of ours both on the way out and back (although not always if it didn't look near the size limit)
humptydumpty - on 19 Oct 2013
Anyone ever had a helmet rejected from hand luggage? That's the only thing I don't check - scared it would get crushed.
In reply to Dave Garnett:

>
> They did weigh some of ours both on the way out and back (although not always if it didn't look near the size limit)

The have never seemed fussed by daysacs, as long as you aren't obviously taking the piss!


Chris
ewar woowar on 19 Oct 2013
In reply to r0x0r.wolfo:
> (In reply to Michael Gordon)
> [...]
>
> Not on ryanair, they weight your hand luggage. Got stung 60 quid about a month ago.

I haven't had my hand luggage weighed on the last 4 flights with them.
Then again, it doesn't look that heavy.
abseil on 20 Oct 2013
In reply to r0x0r.wolfo:
> Not on ryanair, they weight your hand luggage...

Right. And many other airlines also have rules about the weight of hand luggage, and some enforce them.
ads.ukclimbing.com
GridNorth - on 20 Oct 2013
In reply to humptydumpty:
> Anyone ever had a helmet rejected from hand luggage?

Yes.

To be fair to Ryanair my bag was a little overweight on a flight to Oslo so they weighed my hand baggage and as that was OK I didn't get charged.

I've witnessed two groups of climbers going through different security scanners with ropes. One party got refused the other didn't for the same flight.
sebrider - on 20 Oct 2013
In reply to chris smith:

I had problems once coming back from a season in Chamonix. As there was no weight limit on hand luggage...I put all my metal, except spiky stuff, into my hand luggage. It was quite heavy :) They luckily just got me to put it at the front of the plane, I did find it amusing taking it through security...well, there is nothing sharp!

The double standards of restrictions on hand luggage does frustrate me somewhat. I'm obviously fine with no knives, guns, and needles etc. but a quickdraw or two?! When you consider how good a weapon a broken glass bottle of spirit from duty free would be, how come that is allowed?! Obviously because the airport makes lots of money off it! Passenger safety first as long as airport shopping is not loosing out!
keith sanders - on 21 Oct 2013
In reply to chris smith:
I fly with Ryanair 3/4 times a year for 14/15 years now all over Europe and Nice is the worst for checks including easyjet BMI and all other airlines.1 person got stopped with a small tin of ham I ask why take a tin of ham.
That said most of the time it cost less than 50 return some times with hold luggage. you can't blame the airline all the time but it makes sense not to put quick draws rope etc in hand luggage, just pay for a hold bag and there's no problem.
Offwidth - on 21 Oct 2013
In reply to Chris Craggs:

Plus they are flexible so squeeze OK into those size check things even when they cheat by rounding the corners.
Neil Williams - on 21 Oct 2013
In reply to Offwidth:

Some Ryanair airports are known to insist that squashing it in is not acceptable. That said I use a 30l daysack as hand luggage and no-one ever bats an eyelid at it even if full. It's trolley bags they tend to put in the sizer.

Neil
Simon Caldwell - on 21 Oct 2013
In reply to escudoturbo:
Your reply ought to be saved and automatically linked every time this subject comes up!
Jus - on 21 Oct 2013
In reply to chris smith:

I've taken climbing gear (ropes, harness, quickdraws etc)as hand luggage on dozens of European flights and never had a problem!
timjones - on 21 Oct 2013
In reply to Neil Williams:
> (In reply to Offwidth)
>
> Some Ryanair airports are known to insist that squashing it in is not acceptable. That said I use a 30l daysack as hand luggage and no-one ever bats an eyelid at it even if full. It's trolley bags they tend to put in the sizer.
>

You obviously need to practice squashing in a more subtle manner. I've never had a problem even when I've had to smile sweetly and ask the lady doing the checking to put her foot on the gauge so that I can get my bag back out ;)
Scottie Boy - on 22 Oct 2013
In reply to pamph:
> (In reply to chris smith) I've just returned from a week in Mallorca and took my harness (with chalk bag and Sticht plate), quickdraws and rock boots in my hand luggage. I've done this for the past seven or eight years to Mallorca and Spain, the theory being that if my luggage gets lost, I can still get some climbing done, providing my mates rope arrives in the hold baggage. I have never had problem flying from several Scottish airports and back.

You lucky beggar. Jet2.com were having none of it when I was off to Costa Blanca. To be fair, in respect of my rope, when I said he had more chance of me strangling him with it than doing anything with it on the plane this maybe didn't help matters. Got it all in the hold with no extra charge. Prob. best to do that and be better safe than sorry (& hope nobody nicks it in transit).
Fat Bumbly2 - on 22 Oct 2013
Do these restrictions apply to the new Louis Vuitton belt?
iank - on 22 Oct 2013
Like many others, I have had ropes rejected by security, on the grounds you can tie someone up. When I pointed out that I could do this much more easily with my shoelaces, no useful response was made. The only good thing was that I could return to check in and they took the additional bag without problem even though the checked bag was already at the limit.
I was once on local flight in the Middle East when passengers in the back took out a stove and started brewing up.
Michael Gordon - on 22 Oct 2013
In reply to iank:

I made the same comment, however you could tie up a lot more folk with 50m of rope than a couple of shoe laces!
BnB - on 22 Oct 2013
In reply to Michael Gordon:
> (In reply to iank)
>
> I made the same comment, however you could tie up a lot more folk with 50m of rope than a couple of shoe laces!

Yes, but once you've started, how do you tie further passengers into the middle of the rope? ;-)
pamph - on 22 Oct 2013
In reply to Scottie Boy:
> (In reply to pamph)
> [...]
>
> You lucky beggar. Jet2.com were having none of it when I was off to Costa Blanca. To be fair, in respect of my rope, when I said he had more chance of me strangling him with it than doing anything with it on the plane this maybe didn't help matters. Got it all in the hold with no extra charge. Prob. best to do that and be better safe than sorry (& hope nobody nicks it in transit).

That's really odd, as I flew with Jet2 from Glasgow to Palma and there were no issues at all.
Neil Williams - on 22 Oct 2013
In reply to pamph:

The airline is irrelevant. Security is provided and controlled by the airport.

Neil
Michael Gordon - on 22 Oct 2013
In reply to BnB:

Indeed would any terrorist be using one of Beal/Mammut/etc's finest?
lost1977 - on 22 Oct 2013
In reply to chris smith:

If you reasilsed some of the stuff I have got away with over the years (set of chainmail armour was my best)
GrahamD - on 23 Oct 2013
In reply to iank:
> Like many others, I have had ropes rejected by security, on the grounds you can tie someone up. When I pointed out that I could do this much more easily with my shoelaces, no useful response was made.

Of course there wasn't. Its not the job of security to try and second guess why people think they need unusual items with them on board (especially given the time they have available per search). Its their job to try to minimise risk to passengers.
FatAz on 23 Oct 2013
Worked as a bouncer back in Oz. Mate got stabbed with a ball point pen. Asked security at Luton about taking clutch pencils onto the flight (much sharper than a ballpoint) & he got this pained expression and shrugged. Half the time I think they know the rules are bollocks. Doesn't help when having gear rejected from your luggage though.

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