/ Send

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bpmclimb - on 19 Oct 2013
Does "send" apply exclusively to successful ascents of boulder problems and sport routes, or can one "send" a trad route?
SteveoS - on 19 Oct 2013
In reply to bpmclimb:

Yes.
Chambers - on 19 Oct 2013
In reply to SteveoS: Where can you send it to?
remus - on 19 Oct 2013
In reply to Chambers:
> (In reply to SteveoS) Where can you send it to?

Enquire at your local post office.
Choss on 19 Oct 2013
In reply to bpmclimb:

I can honestly say, i have only ever heard the term send used in relation to climbing on Interweb forums and blogs. Never once in the real world. Not even ironically.

Whether its use is actually acceptable should be voted on at the next BMC area meeting. Until then its use should be stopped unless you are Under 25 and climbing f9a minimum.

Offwidth - on 19 Oct 2013
In reply to Choss:

Common in the US. You need to be more rad, dude.
Choss on 19 Oct 2013
In reply to Offwidth:
> (In reply to Choss)
>
> Common in the US. You need to be more rad, dude.

Might sound not too offensive in Californian dirtbag type drawl?

But in heavy Bristolian or Brummie say. No No and No.
In reply to Choss: I'm pretty sanguine on "send" now just like I can handle calling my waterproof trousers "pants" without sniggering (much) anymore. We live in globalized world and climbing is to some extent a global subculture. There's a big fashion amongst educated, hipster-ish, NPR-listening-type Americans to use British expressions so it goes both ways.

I must admit I am having my patience tested currently by American climber fashion to use alpine as noun not an adjective. Although I totally failed to get a rise out of Andrew Bisharat on twitter suggesting this, after he wrote he was looking forward to getting "back into the alpine" the other week.
The Pylon King on 19 Oct 2013
In reply to bpmclimb:
> Does "send" apply exclusively to successful ascents of boulder problems and sport routes, or can one "send" a trad route?

C8nts have the ability to send anything.
Jonny2vests - on 19 Oct 2013
In reply to TobyA:

It's more of a noun than an adjective.
Choss on 19 Oct 2013
In reply to bpmclimb:

right, walk the dog down River, couple of pints for Lunch, then if the rain holds off, i may Allez to my local blocs for some sending with bon Effort.

Failing that may just go bouldering at local crag.
In reply to Jonny2vests:

> It's more of a noun than an adjective.

In what way beyond, according to my dictionary, a type of butterfly or family of plants?
BnB - on 19 Oct 2013
In reply to TobyA and Jonny2vests:

Use of "Alpine" in this context is that of an adjectival noun, more often called a noun adjunct or attributive noun.

So I guess you are both right. Whether you like its use in this manner is another matter.
Michael Gordon - on 19 Oct 2013
In reply to BnB:

Could it not be either an adjective or adjectival noun, depending on context?

'Alpine' means Alp-like, i.e. like the Alps. It would always go just before the noun, e.g. Alpine start. 'Getting back into the Alpine' is nonsensical as the noun is missing - it should be getting back into the Alpine stuff, Alpine starts etc.

On the other hand you could say something looks Alpine though.
Jon Stewart - on 19 Oct 2013
In reply to Michael Gordon:

What the hell are you guys on about?

It is used both as a verb, (to) send it (dude)

and as a noun, woah, great send (dude).

It has never been, and never will be an adjective (sendy?) or an adverb (sendily?) or anything else!
Kirriemuir - on 19 Oct 2013
In reply to Jon Stewart: The weather can be described as "sendy"...coldish, dry, breezy. Prime sandstone sending conditions.
Jon Stewart - on 19 Oct 2013
In reply to Kirriemuir:
> (In reply to Jon Stewart) The weather can be described as "sendy"...

Oh God.

Andy Moles - on 19 Oct 2013
In reply to Jon Stewart:

It can so be an adjective.

As in, "I can hear the send train coming."
Andy Moles - on 19 Oct 2013
"Choo choo."
The Pylon King on 19 Oct 2013
In reply to bpmclimb:

"that route sends really well"
wercat on 19 Oct 2013
In reply to Michael Gordon:

It's not really nonsensical as the Romans used this grammatical form - I can remember having to translate J. Caesar's accounts of his punch-ups with foreigners using this kind of construction.
wercat on 19 Oct 2013
I suppose the word Alpine means "of or pertaining to the Alps" and you just have to assume the noun "things" which allows you to infer any suitable noun - e.g. activities or mountaineering or some form of gardening.
Choss on 19 Oct 2013
In reply to bpmclimb:

This just in. BMC agree the terms send, sent, and sending can be used in the south west area.

However, to Prevent this Becoming the thin end of the climbing Grammar edge, its use must be restricted to the regions gritstone.

Oh, and all tight fitting woolly type hats should have a Bobble.
BnB - on 19 Oct 2013
In reply to wercat:
> (In reply to Michael Gordon)
>
> It's not really nonsensical as the Romans used this grammatical form - I can remember having to translate J. Caesar's accounts of his punch-ups with foreigners using this kind of construction.

Yes. But what did he ever do on grit?
BnB - on 19 Oct 2013
In reply to Jon Stewart:

The adjectival form of send would be "sent" not "sendy", as in "sent problems"
The gerund (verbal noun) is "the sent", as in that rather good French ALPINE tv show "The Returned". You could split your challenges into "the sents" and "the ascents". Sorry, I'll get my coat.
SteveoS - on 19 Oct 2013
In reply to Chambers:

Sendvile of course.

Choss on 19 Oct 2013
In reply to wercat:
> (In reply to Michael Gordon)
>
> It's not really nonsensical as the Romans used this grammatical form - I can remember having to translate J. Caesar's accounts of his punch-ups with foreigners using this kind of construction.

just because Caesar did something, doesnt Mean its right. Mostly wrong in fact.

Besides, he came to Britain Twice and got his arse kicked both Times. The weather was too sendy for him.

On the whole alpine thing, i reckon you either want to get Back either

To the alps
To alpine climbing
Or
To alpinism

Not to the alpine. regardless of grammar rules that just Sounds silly

Michael Gordon - on 19 Oct 2013
In reply to Choss: Quite right!
neuromancer - on 19 Oct 2013
In reply to bpmclimb:

Hello BPM0A ti 0A send k
Choss on 19 Oct 2013
In reply to bpmclimb:

Ive checked the holy Books: Fawcett on rock, and, rock Athlete.

Big Ron climbed many things, but never once sent anything!

Therefore, in the UK, Thou shalt always Climb, never send!

That is surely the Final word on the Matter?

MODERATORS - LOCK THIS THREAD!


Franco Cookson on 19 Oct 2013
In reply to bpmclimb:

"He sendly walked up the route, with sendliferous ease."

""That send went without unsending sentiment", he exclaimed"

Disrespectful, lazy word, which identifies people as total cockwombles.
JIMBO on 19 Oct 2013
In reply to Franco Cookson:
> Disrespectful, lazy word, which identifies people as total cockwombles.

Unlike "cockwomble" which presumably isn't disrespectful or lazy?

'Send' is just a word to describe making a successful ascent... can't believe the fuss. Climbing is full of slang and community specific terms.
Jon Stewart - on 19 Oct 2013
In reply to JIMBO:
> (In reply to Franco Cookson)
> [...]
>
> Unlike "cockwomble" which presumably isn't disrespectful or lazy?

"Cockwomble" is disrespectful, but it isn't lazy. It's creative and exuberant. Good work Franco!
Choss on 19 Oct 2013
In reply to Jon Stewart:

Youre Heathens!

I Declared send is not acceptable in Britain, quoting climbing holy Scripture. Yet still you quibble?

Oh where are the true believers?

On Lord of the Flies did Ron disciple say can you send it? NO, he said will it go?


Ps cockwomble is my Second favourite leftfield insult of the year. After the person who called David Cameron a "box of Wanker"
Offwidth - on 19 Oct 2013
In reply to Franco Cookson: hey dude I remember like when you could barely write with words and now you d'emperor of adjectivalness ya know. Sweet.
Jon Stewart - on 19 Oct 2013
In reply to Offwidth:
> (In reply to Franco Cookson) hey dude I remember like when you could barely write with words and now you d'emperor of adjectivalness ya know. Sweet.

Surreal!
Jonny2vests - on 19 Oct 2013
In reply to JIMBO:
> (In reply to Franco Cookson)
> [...]
>
> Unlike "cockwomble" which presumably isn't disrespectful or lazy?
>
> 'Send' is just a word to describe making a successful ascent... can't believe the fuss. Climbing is full of slang and community specific terms.

Can't believe you're taking it so seriously.
Jonny2vests - on 19 Oct 2013
In reply to TobyA:
> (In reply to Jonny2vests)
>
> [...]
>
> In what way beyond, according to my dictionary, a type of butterfly or family of plants?

It's very common round these parts for climbers and skiers to refer to the 'local alpine' as the area above the tree line. Alpine is a region, demarcated by height and trees, therefore a noun, no? (I'm not especially good at this game btw).
Jon Stewart - on 19 Oct 2013
In reply to Jonny2vests:
> (In reply to TobyA)
> [...]
>
> It's very common round these parts for climbers and skiers to refer to the 'local alpine' as the area above the tree line. Alpine is a region, demarcated by height and trees, therefore a noun, no? (I'm not especially good at this game btw).

Yeah, it's an adjective being used as a noun in a way that grates horribly on grammar-Nazis (which is a tendancy I have but try to suppress as it makes me into a hypocrite since I'm always using 'less' and 'fewer' incorrectly). When I worked in the Border Agency, we always used to talk about "illegals" [illegal workers] and that grated horribly too.
Michael Gordon - on 19 Oct 2013
In reply to Jonny2vests:
> (In reply to TobyA)
> [...]
>
> It's very common round these parts for climbers and skiers to refer to the 'local alpine' as the area above the tree line. Alpine is a region, demarcated by height and trees, therefore a noun, no?

The Alps is a region. You could talk about an Alpine landscape but not an Alpine.
ads.ukclimbing.com
Choss on 19 Oct 2013
In reply to Jonny2vests:

But this is UK Climbing, not Canada.

As an aside. Alps arent mountains at all. Theyre Meadows Below mountains.


Offwidth - on 19 Oct 2013
In reply to Jon Stewart:

Many should have used less fewer.
Jonny2vests - on 19 Oct 2013
In reply to Michael Gordon:
> (In reply to Jonny2vests)
> [...]
>
> The Alps is a region. You could talk about an Alpine landscape but not an Alpine.

No, not an alpine, the alpine.
In reply to Jonny2vests:

> It's very common round these parts

Which would seem to confirm the prejudice of my now sadly deceased Great Aunty Betty from Halifax (Nova Scotia, not West Yorks) that all her fellow Canadians west of the French speaking ones were a bit too suspiciously like the neighbours to the south!
Jonny2vests - on 19 Oct 2013
In reply to Choss:
> (In reply to Jonny2vests)
>
> But this is UK Climbing, not Canada.
>
> As an aside. Alps arent mountains at all. Theyre Meadows Below mountains.

But having Alpine ranges arguably makes them more qualified to use it than Brits.

Who said anything about mountains?
Choss on 19 Oct 2013
In reply to Jonny2vests:
> (In reply to Michael Gordon)
> [...]
>
> No, not an alpine, the alpine.

Disagree. There is the alps, alpine Climbing, alpine skiing, alpine walking, alpine flora, alpine fauna, alpinism.

But no the alpine. just doesnt Scan over here

Choss on 19 Oct 2013
In reply to Jonny2vests:
> (In reply to Choss)
> [...]
>
> But having Alpine ranges arguably makes them more qualified to use it than Brits.
>
> Who said anything about mountains?

Canada doesnt have any alpine ranges. Theyre a European geographic area.

Canada has ranges of a similar geographic Nature with Apparently no colloquial nomenclature, so locals have coopted the Term alpine to describe them.



Choss on 19 Oct 2013
In reply to Choss:

Sorry. locals was wrong Term for Canada.

should have said non indigenous Immigrants. locals would refer to first Nation people.
Michael Gordon - on 19 Oct 2013
In reply to Jonny2vests:
> (In reply to Michael Gordon)
> [...]
>
> No, not an alpine, the alpine.

Equally nonsensical
Michael Gordon - on 19 Oct 2013
In reply to Choss:

'Locals' are just anyone living in the immediate area, i.e. the locality. You can move to an area and become a local and have shops etc local to you.
Choss on 19 Oct 2013
In reply to Michael Gordon:
> (In reply to Choss)
>
> 'Locals' are just anyone living in the immediate area, i.e. the locality. You can move to an area and become a local and have shops etc local to you.

I get that. But it doesnt wear well in a post Colonial context. Im Sure many first nation Americans and Australians would disagree with you.

By that definition, moving into an area makes you a local. Australian first nation people are still fighting to get their ancestors Remains returned From British universities. They were stolen by the new Australian locals of the Time. Ie British colonialists, who are still fighting to keep the remains using science as their excuse.

So. Anyone who Lives on my estate is a local. But in post colonial Canada etc it Takes on a different Meaning
Michael Gordon - on 19 Oct 2013
In reply to Choss:

I wonder if you are confusing 'local' with 'native'? The term 'local' should be entirely free from controversy, being a purely geographical term like 'global'.
Choss on 19 Oct 2013
In reply to Michael Gordon:

In a UK context they Mean different than to Other cultures. Its easy for us to Apply grammar. Intent and Meaning of Terms Means different things to different people.

Except send, or to alpine, Which is always wrong 7;^)
John Stainforth - on 19 Oct 2013
In reply to Franco Cookson:

Surely the correct syntax is "send up" rather than "sendly... up"?
Michael Gordon - on 19 Oct 2013
In reply to Choss:

It's the English language so I think what the Brits say, goes. If others want to interpret the words incorrectly I guess that's up to them!
jonnie3430 - on 19 Oct 2013
In reply to Michael Gordon:
> (In reply to Jonny2vests)
> [...]
>
> The Alps is a region. You could talk about an Alpine landscape but not an Alpine.

Don't forget the Arrochar Alps to the North West of Glasgow. Routes on the Cobbler are all Alpine.
harold walmsley - on 19 Oct 2013
In reply to Choss:
Its better to send a boulder (problem) rather than crushing it, at least it remains for future generations. Also for mountain bikers riding a trail is better than shredding it.
Franco Cookson on 19 Oct 2013
In reply to Offwidth:

Sage innit. Struggling through my disslex here.
Calder - on 19 Oct 2013
In reply to bpmclimb:
> Does "send" apply exclusively to successful ascents of boulder problems and sport routes, or can one "send" a trad route?

I prefer the threads with unnecessary or excessive maths to this word/grammar game thing.
Jonny2vests - on 20 Oct 2013
In reply to Choss:
> (In reply to Jonny2vests)
> [...]
>
> Canada doesnt have any alpine ranges. Theyre a European geographic area.

That is one definition, you know full well that it is commonly used outside of Europe. Anyone know how the OED defines it?

Avalanche and weather forecasters here and all over often use Alpine as a noun.
Offwidth - on 20 Oct 2013
In reply to Franco Cookson:

Word.
jaygimmer - on 22 Oct 2013
In reply to bpmclimb:
> Does "send" apply exclusively to successful ascents of boulder problems and sport routes, or can one "send" a trad route?

Daft term.
Jamie B - on 22 Oct 2013
In reply to bpmclimb:

I always assumed that "send" was short for "ascend". Fair?
john arran - on 22 Oct 2013
In reply to Jamie B:

Pretty sure it originates via 'dispatch', as in 'despite the high grade he dispatched it in quick time'

For a short time the yanks would also say "Fax it, dude!"
bpmclimb - on 23 Oct 2013
In reply to Jamie B:
> (In reply to bpmclimb)
>
> I always assumed that "send" was short for "ascend". Fair?

Maybe so. Never occurred to me, I have to admit.
beardy mike - on 24 Oct 2013
In reply to john arran: Now THAT needs to be reintroduced. It has a certain retro old skool appeal to it. "What an awesome fax!" "He tried to fax it but just got an answerphone." "He was halfway through the fax and almost had to replace the ink cartridge but luckily it held out."

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