/ Commonly mispronounced words

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estivoautumnal - on 21 Oct 2013
That aren't necessarily Americans just getting it wrong.

Espresso. Expresso.
Schedule. Skedule.
Itinerary. Itenery.


Any others?
highclimber - on 21 Oct 2013
In reply to estivoautumnal: pacifically i.e. specifically.
ripper - on 21 Oct 2013
In reply to estivoautumnal: many years ago when I was young and wet behind the ears at this climbing lark, I had a conversation with a friend who'd obviously read about America's premier big-walling location but never actually heard it mentioned out loud. He told me how much he'd love, one day, to go to "Yosser-might".
Alyson - on 21 Oct 2013
In reply to estivoautumnal:

Controversy pronounced controverse-y
Trangia - on 21 Oct 2013
In reply to estivoautumnal:

When ordering a coffee

"Latte"

It's Italian, so

The "a" is pronounced as in latch not as in larder
Mark Kemball - on 21 Oct 2013
In reply to estivoautumnal: Grass, said as grarse by southerners who know no better!
Blue Straggler - on 21 Oct 2013
In reply to estivoautumnal:

Libery (library)
ow arm - on 21 Oct 2013
ask - axe
drawing - droring
llanfairpwllgwyngyll gogerychwyrndrobwyll llantysiliogofgoch - ermm...
Blue Straggler - on 21 Oct 2013
In reply to Trangia:
> (In reply to estivoautumnal)
>
> When ordering a coffee
>
> "Latte"
>
> It's Italian

What about that pizza empire "Domino's"? I thought maybe it should be Do-mee-no, in keeping with pizza being Italian :-)
MG - on 21 Oct 2013
In reply to Alyson:
> (In reply to estivoautumnal)
>
> Controversy pronounced controverse-y

Are you saying conTRoversy is wrong or right? Be careful how you answer!

999thAndy on 21 Oct 2013
In reply to estivoautumnal:

Almost any word containing a U seems to fox our southern brethren...

;-)
zebidee - on 21 Oct 2013
In reply to owena:
> ask - axe

It's not even that good ... it's often aks - as in "I aksed him a question."

God that one really grinds my gears!

Trangia - on 21 Oct 2013
In reply to estivoautumnal:

Also

When describing the letter "H" it's pronounced "aitch". There is no "H" at the beginning, or if there is, it's soft :)
MG - on 21 Oct 2013
In reply to estivoautumnal:

Scon (right people) Scone (wrong people)
Nuthing (normal people) Nothing (yorkshire people)
TraVerse (normal people) TRaverse (yorkshire people)
Absail (English) Abseil (Krautspeak)
Railway station(right people) Train station (wrong people and Americans)
Chris the Tall - on 21 Oct 2013
In reply to estivoautumnal:
Scone - does it rhyme with Gone or Stone

I grew up in Clitheroe Lancs and go with the former, but was arguing with someone who grew up in Skipton, about 15 miles away, who goes with the latter.

highclimber - on 21 Oct 2013
In reply to owena:
> ask - axe
> drawing - droring
> llanfairpwllgwyngyll gogerychwyrndrobwyll llantysiliogofgoch - ermm...

BETSY CO-ED!!! ahhhhggggggg it's betus-a-coyd
highclimber - on 21 Oct 2013
In reply to Chris the Tall:
> (In reply to estivoautumnal)
> Scone - does it rhyme with Gone or Stone
>
> I grew up in Clitheroe Lancs and go with the former, but was arguing with someone who grew up in Skipton, about 15 miles away, who goes with the latter.

You certainly don't pronounce 'one' as 'wone' but as won which means scone is certainly the former. (Lancashire lad ere too)
Trangia - on 21 Oct 2013
In reply to estivoautumnal:

InVENtory rather than Inv'try
rug - on 21 Oct 2013
In reply to estivoautumnal:

> Schedule. Skedule.


From OED :

Definition of schedule in English

schedule
Pronunciation: /ˈʃɛdjuːl, ˈskɛd-/

i.e. both the Shed and Sked pronunciations are valid.

Rug
In reply to estivoautumnal: ibuprofen stumps most people for some reason.
Andy Say - on 21 Oct 2013
In reply to highclimber:
> (In reply to owena)
> [...]
>
> BETSY CO-ED!!! ahhhhggggggg it's betus-a-coyd

NO. According to my Satnav it is BETWIS WHY COAT. Can't get much more definitive.
highclimber - on 21 Oct 2013
In reply to Andy Say: I stand corrected, then! can we get your sat nav to pronounce some of the other suggestions on here? let's start with Scone
rug - on 21 Oct 2013
In reply to rug:
> Pronunciation: /ˈʃɛdjuːl, ˈskɛd-/

Arse ! Stupid forum. But the point still stands :o)
yorkshireman - on 21 Oct 2013
In reply to highclimber:

HyperchondriACT
ContraBAN
Trangia - on 21 Oct 2013
In reply to highclimber:
> (In reply to owena)
> [...]
>
> BETSY CO-ED!!! ahhhhggggggg it's betus-a-coyd

Iwerne Minster in Dorset stumps all but the locals!

I haven't tested it on my Satnav yet.

Kimono - on 21 Oct 2013
In reply to Blue Straggler:
> (In reply to Trangia)
> [...]
>
> What about that pizza empire "Domino's"? I thought maybe it should be Do-mee-no, in keeping with pizza being Italian :-)

There's nothing even vaguely italian about a dominos!

Controversy can of course be pronounced either way without causing a, er controversy :)

Anyone for Froncysyllte??


FesteringSore - on 21 Oct 2013
In reply to estivoautumnal:
Beddgelert - Beedlegert
Dolgellau - Dolgerlow
Ruthin - RUTH in
Plas Madoc - Plasma Dog :)
Trangia - on 21 Oct 2013
In reply to FesteringSore:
> (In reply to estivoautumnal)
>
> Plas Madoc - Plasma Dog :)


LOL! That is a Classic!
Spike - on 21 Oct 2013
In reply to estivoautumnal:
moot point - mute point
Pinkney - on 21 Oct 2013
In reply to Trangia:
> (In reply to highclimber)
> [...]
>
> Iwerne Minster in Dorset stumps all but the locals!
>
> I haven't tested it on my Satnav yet.

I went to shool around there and one lad used to think it was I-were-a-minister. Mind you I think he was around 5 at the time. Never known any one else strugle mind.

But the following
Ass should be arse when not referring to a donkey
Grass, glass, bath,brass
ads.ukclimbing.com
joan cooper - on 21 Oct 2013
In reply to joan cooper: An American asked us the way to Dolly galoo
Kimono - on 21 Oct 2013
In reply to FesteringSore:
> (In reply to estivoautumnal)
> Beddgelert - Beedlegert
> Dolgellau - Dolgerlow
> Ruthin - RUTH in
> Plas Madoc - Plasma Dog :)

I always wonder why the english version of Ruthin isnt Rithin...would make more sense

highclimber - on 21 Oct 2013
In reply to Kimono: the sign was probably made by an englishman.
Kimono - on 21 Oct 2013
In reply to highclimber:
exactly...and as he was hearing it pronounced with an 'i' why not spell it like that?
In reply to highclimber:
> (In reply to owena)
> [...]
>
> BETSY CO-ED!!! ahhhhggggggg it's betus-a-coyd

To be fair, it's hardly surprising that people mispronounce that.
In reply to estivoautumnal: On the topic of foreign words, it's bAbushka, not babUshka and SharApova, not SharapOva.
Fraser on 21 Oct 2013
In reply to estivoautumnal:

All of the following from one of my colleagues:

- ashoom (assume)
- preshoom (presume)
- somethink (something)
- noo (new, pr. 'nyoo')

Kimono - on 21 Oct 2013
In reply to Submit to Gravity:
AlmOdovar, not AlmodOvar
BMrider - on 21 Oct 2013
In reply to estivoautumnal:

must've, could've, would've - must of, could of, would of

perhaps - prehaps
Al Evans on 21 Oct 2013
In reply to Kimono: Mute when meaning to say moot.
Kimono - on 21 Oct 2013
In reply to Al Evans:
saying mute point when of course you mean moot point :)
planetmarshall on 21 Oct 2013
In reply to owena:
> ask - axe

This is metathesis, and has been a common feature of the English language for centuries. It's the reason 'Bird' is now spelt that way instead of 'Bryd'. See also 'iron', and numerous other examples. You may as well get used to 'aks' now...

JJL - on 21 Oct 2013
In reply to estivoautumnal:

"House"; has no "w"
Al Evans on 21 Oct 2013
In reply to Al Evans: And of course there is thia
"Pronunciation of lieutenant is generally split between the forms /lɛfˈtɛnənt/ lef-ten-ənt and Listeni/ljuːˈtɛnənt/ lew-ten-ənt, with the former generally associated with the armies of the United Kingdom and Commonwealth countries, and the latter generally associated with anyone from the United States.[1] The early history of the pronunciation is unclear; Middle English spellings suggest that the /ljuː-/ and /lɛf-/ pronunciations may have existed even then.[2] The rare Old French variant spelling luef for Modern French lieu ('place') supports the suggestion that a final [w] of the Old French word was in certain environments perceived as an [f].[2]
In Royal Naval tradition—and other English-speaking navies outside the United States—a reduced pronunciation /ləˈtɛnənt/ is used. This is not recognized as current by the OED, however, and by 1954 the Royal Canadian Navy, at least, regarded it as "obsolescent" even while regarding "the army's 'LEF-tenant'" to be "a corruption of the worst sort".[3]"
GrahamD - on 21 Oct 2013
In reply to estivoautumnal:

chorizo is chorizo, not chor - its - so
highclimber - on 21 Oct 2013
In reply to Submit to Gravity:
> (In reply to highclimber)
> [...]
>
> To be fair, it's hardly surprising that people mispronounce that.

It is surprising considering Betws looks nothing like betsy. There are no double ll's or ch's for people to confuse with each other.
Fraser on 21 Oct 2013
In reply to GrahamD:

I've also heard a lot of folk pronounce it chor-ee-tho. I've no idea which is correct.
Jim C - on 21 Oct 2013
In reply to Spike:
> (In reply to estivoautumnal)
> moot point - mute point

I got corrected for that one recently, it was a fair point.

I had just corrected someone for daring-do ( Derring) so that is another example
GrahamD - on 21 Oct 2013
In reply to Fraser:

At least the chor-ee-tho is close to the way some Spaniards say it (basically the z prounounced with a lisp)
felt - on 21 Oct 2013
In reply to estivoautumnal:

Research. Reasearch.
In reply to highclimber:
> (In reply to Submit to Gravity)
> [...]
>
> It is surprising considering Betws looks nothing like betsy. There are no double ll's or ch's for people to confuse with each other.

If the Welsh want people to pronounce their words correctly they should use some bloody vowels occasionally!
mattsccm - on 21 Oct 2013
In reply to Submit to Gravity:
Scone is own as its a noun
Scon can't go with gone as gone isn't a noun.
Our said as are winds me up.
Of course by default anything pronounced Yorkshire that isn't from Yorkshire will be wrong.
Simon4 - on 21 Oct 2013
In reply to all on this thread : OK, smart arses, how do you pronounce the mountain in Scotland named "Liathach" then?
chad halfwit - on 21 Oct 2013
In reply to estivoautumnal: gave up on y Lliwedd its just the next one on the horseshoe after Yr Wyddfa....
planetmarshall on 21 Oct 2013
In reply to Simon4: Lee-ach (hard ch as in loch).
a lakeland climber on 21 Oct 2013
In reply to estivoautumnal:

Noos rather than News
Toosday rather than Tuesday

Scone rhymes with gone not stone

As for Welsh pronunciations, one I heard was "Roody doo" for Rhyd Ddu.

ALC
Troy Tempest - on 21 Oct 2013
In reply to estivoautumnal:

Bit of a digression but I've noticed recently a few people (Students) shout 'LIKE' at the top of their voice when they see something that pleases them, as in liking something on Facebook.
timjones - on 21 Oct 2013
In reply to FesteringSore:
> (In reply to estivoautumnal)
> Beddgelert - Beedlegert
> Dolgellau - Dolgerlow
> Ruthin - RUTH in
> Plas Madoc - Plasma Dog :)

Don 't forget Triffin ;(
Dave Garnett - on 21 Oct 2013
In reply to estivoautumnal:

Zoology. It's zo-ology, not zoo-ology.
Kimono - on 21 Oct 2013
In reply to Dave Garnett:
> (In reply to estivoautumnal)
>
> Zoology. It's zo-ology, not zoo-ology.

Really??

ads.ukclimbing.com
Graham Mck on 21 Oct 2013
In reply to estivoautumnal: tW@t as opposed to tw@T. Either of which sums up anybody remotely bothered by mispronounced words :)
tlm - on 21 Oct 2013
In reply to estivoautumnal:

quietus - kee-ate-us, not quite-us
tortillas - tor-tee-uhs not tort-ill-uhs
felt - on 21 Oct 2013
In reply to tlm:

portillo - por-tee-oh not port-ill-o
Spike - on 21 Oct 2013
In reply to a lakeland climber:

your use of the word "stone" as a way of showing the sound of saying "scone" may well be challenged in West Cumbria - where we pronounce the word "stone" as "stianne"

although to be fair I get your meaning and agree your main point is right on the general pronunciation of the word!

perhaps scone in our dialect would be "scianne" but its not, it is "scon"

to throw another one in - local dialect for "cake" = "ciak" (kind of like cioche only harder in second syllable)
Have fun
S
highclimber - on 21 Oct 2013
In reply to tlm: Fajitas pronounced 'Faj-itas' or, more amusingly 'fan-jitas'.
Mikkel - on 21 Oct 2013
In reply to estivoautumnal:

My name, and that is something which mostly English seems to get wrong.
Most Americans can do it quite well.
highclimber - on 21 Oct 2013
In reply to highclimber: And while we're on the mexican/spanish theme - Paella pronounced pi-ella annoys me somewhat though I put it down to lack of education of other languages in schools.
John2 - on 21 Oct 2013
In reply to highclimber: It's about time someone mentioned mispronounciation.
Dave Garnett - on 21 Oct 2013
In reply to Kimono:
> (In reply to Dave Garnett)
> [...]
>
> Really??

Really. Count the o's!
a lakeland climber on 21 Oct 2013
In reply to Spike:

"giatt" = gate in Cumbrian, "yam' = home, "yow" = ewe.

eh marra?

ALC
lithos on 21 Oct 2013

a friends starts a posh meal with can-apps
could be followed by ka-jun chicken
In reply to Dave Garnett:

> Really. Count the o's!

Watching my kids learn to read and write and Finnish and English over the last couple of years really makes the point that the letters in English words don't have that much to do with pronunciation!

FesteringSore - on 21 Oct 2013
In reply to estivoautumnal:
Benelmadinner for Benalmadena
FesteringSore - on 21 Oct 2013
In reply to estivoautumnal:

Cayder Eyedrus
Kimono - on 21 Oct 2013
In reply to Mikkel:
Well, give us a clue? I suspect the emphasis is on the e?
Coel Hellier - on 21 Oct 2013
In reply to estivoautumnal:

Consortium: con-sor-tee-um, not con-sor-sshum.

FesteringSore - on 21 Oct 2013
In reply to estivoautumnal:
Aran Fordwee
Tow cess ter
Chol mond lee
highclimber - on 21 Oct 2013
In reply to TobyA:
> (In reply to Dave Garnett)
>
> [...]
>
> Watching my kids learn to read and write and Finnish and English over the last couple of years really makes the point that the letters in English words don't have that much to do with pronunciation!

is that due to the fact that Finnish is phonetic and English is, well, not?
wercat on 21 Oct 2013
In reply to estivoautumnal:

Nukular (astonishingly prevalent)

How can "in future" possibly be pronounced "going forwards"?

Or "Abreast of" (as in "abreast of the news") be pronounced "Across" ?


MG - on 21 Oct 2013
In reply to wercat:
Kilogram not keelogram
estivoautumnal - on 21 Oct 2013
In reply to Fraser:
> (In reply to estivoautumnal)
>
> All of the following from one of my colleagues:
>
> - ashoom (assume)
> - preshoom (presume)
> - somethink (something)
> - noo (new, pr. 'nyoo')

Sound like the kind of person that would say

ssscchhkool for school


tlm - on 21 Oct 2013
In reply to estivoautumnal:

oh - and 'loo-gar-ber-oo-gah'

...instead of Loughborough
Mikkel - on 21 Oct 2013
In reply to Kimono:
> (In reply to Mikkel)
> Well, give us a clue? I suspect the emphasis is on the e?

Nope you have to sort of pretend the E isn't there for a start.
wercat on 21 Oct 2013
In reply to MG:

Our distinguished physics teacher hit us for not saying kilo as in keeloh
tlm - on 21 Oct 2013
In reply to Mikkel:

Do you mean as in
"Many a Mikkel makes a muckle"?
highclimber - on 21 Oct 2013
In reply to Mikkel:
> (In reply to Kimono)
> [...]
>
> Nope you have to sort of pretend the E isn't there for a start.

and is the 'i' like, well 'like' or like 'lick'?
MG - on 21 Oct 2013
In reply to wercat:did you hit him back?

While we are at it

Kilometre not kiLOMetre
planetmarshall on 21 Oct 2013
In reply to wercat:
> (In reply to estivoautumnal)
>
> Nukular (astonishingly prevalent)
>

About as astonishing as the pronunciation of 'iron'. see previous post on metathesis.
felt - on 21 Oct 2013
In reply to wercat:
> (In reply to estivoautumnal)
>
> Nukular (astonishingly prevalent)

East Angular
Tom V - on 21 Oct 2013
In reply to estivoautumnal:

sixth
ads.ukclimbing.com
mgco3 - on 21 Oct 2013
In reply to estivoautumnal:

Himalayas - "Him a lay az" not "him are lee az"
Caribbean "car a bee an" not "k rib eon"

Scots ( person or persons from Scotland) not scotch .

Fredt on 21 Oct 2013
In reply to estivoautumnal:

Tuolumne

estivoautumnal - on 21 Oct 2013
In reply to mgco3:
> (In reply to estivoautumnal)

>
> Scots ( person or persons from Scotland) not scotch .

Now that's an interesting one. At one time we were Scotch. Even Burns described himself as Scotch. As usual in this country we had a chip on shoulder complex and decided that Scotch was a bit of an English word and started using Scots.
estivoautumnal - on 21 Oct 2013
In reply to estivoautumnal:

Glacier and Glayshier.
biped - on 21 Oct 2013
In reply to estivoautumnal:

Admiralty. Not, as almost everyone says, Admirality.
Jonny2vests - on 21 Oct 2013
In reply to Trangia:
> (In reply to estivoautumnal)
>
> When ordering a coffee
>
> "Latte"
>
> It's Italian, so
>
> The "a" is pronounced as in latch not as in larder

Have you ever tried ordering a Latte in Italy though?
gazhbo - on 21 Oct 2013
In reply to GrahamD:
> (In reply to estivoautumnal)
>
> chorizo is chorizo, not chor - its - so

Both are equally wrong, to be fair.

FiendishMcButton on 21 Oct 2013
In reply to Mikkel:

Is it Dave ;)
aln - on 22 Oct 2013
In reply to mgco3:
> (In reply to estivoautumnal)

> Caribbean "car a bee an" not "k rib eon"

In the West Indies it's pronounced ka rib eon. From the Carib people who lived there.
Blue Straggler - on 22 Oct 2013
In reply to felt:
> (In reply to wercat)
> [...]
>
> East Angular

Is that in Cambridge?
mgco3 - on 22 Oct 2013
In reply to estivoautumnal:

I married into the "Clan" . If her indoors says its Scots I aint going to argue.. I am also reliable informed that Rabbie Burns was just a wee hoor meister frae Alloway.

Andy Long - on 22 Oct 2013
In reply to a lakeland climber:
> (In reply to estivoautumnal)
>
> Noos rather than News
> Toosday rather than Tuesday
>
> The "dropped yod" is perfectly normal in some UK dialects as well as in N. America. Interestingly, "few" always keeps it's yod and is never pronounced "foo".


Andy Long - on 22 Oct 2013
In reply to MG:
>
>
> Kilometre not kiLOMetre

Well said! We don't say "cenTIMmetre" or "kilOGram".

Were such a thing as a "kilOMeter" (note spelling) to exist it would be an instrument for measuring "kils".
SteveoS - on 22 Oct 2013
In reply to estivoautumnal:

Hussif - House wife
UppityClimber - on 22 Oct 2013
In reply to Chris the Tall: has to rhyme with gone otherwise it wouldn't be the fastest cake in the west.
a lakeland climber on 22 Oct 2013
In reply to mgco3:

The correct pronunciation is "him al aya" no final 's'.

ALC
Trangia - on 22 Oct 2013
In reply to biped:
> (In reply to estivoautumnal)
>
> Admiralty. Not, as almost everyone says, Admirality.

Only in the "Navy Lark"
Cheese Monkey - on 22 Oct 2013
In reply to MG:
> (In reply to estivoautumnal)
> Railway station(right people) Train station (wrong people and Americans)

Hmm. So a bus station should be called a road station?
felt - on 22 Oct 2013
In reply to Trangia:

Veterinary. Vetinary sounds much better!
MG - on 22 Oct 2013
In reply to Cheese Monkey:
> (In reply to MG)
> [...]
>
> Hmm. So a bus station should be called a road station?

No.

And for the avoidance of doubt, it's an airport not a planeport.

teflonpete - on 22 Oct 2013
In reply to estivoautumnal:

Wednesday not Wensday

'of' instead of 'have' in could have, should have etc makes my teeth itch.
MG - on 22 Oct 2013
In reply to teflonpete:
> (In reply to estivoautumnal)
>
> Wednesday not Wensday

Wed-nes-day??
In reply to highclimber:

> is that due to the fact that Finnish is phonetic and English is, well, not?

Yep, completely. It's interesting seeing how the English teachers at their school (all native-speakers as long as Canucks and Welsh blokes count ;) have to teach English compared to the Finnish teachers teaching Finnish. Finnish kids don't start school until 7 but then it only takes them about half a day to learn to read and write (ok - so only a slight exaggeration). I feel the English teachers are rushing in the time they have to teach proper for kids at that age.

Lots of amusing phonetic spellings in English though, from all the bilingual kids. I noticed "simballs" on my sons geography test this morning (symbols). That might be my accent to blame as well!
Fredt on 22 Oct 2013
In reply to estivoautumnal:

Feb-ru-ary
Tony Naylor on 22 Oct 2013
In reply to Graham Mck:
> (In reply to estivoautumnal) tW@t as opposed to tw@T. Either of which sums up anybody remotely bothered by mispronounced words :)

Maybe so, but if you mispronounce a lot of words you come across as thick.

ericinbristol - on 22 Oct 2013
avictimoftheDrpsycho - on 22 Oct 2013
In reply to Tony Naylor:
> (In reply to Graham Mck)
> > (In reply to estivoautumnal) tW@t as opposed to tw@T. Either of which sums up anybody remotely bothered by mispronounced words :)

> Maybe so, but if you mispronounce a lot of words you come across as thick.

Only to tw@ts.

Sarah G on 22 Oct 2013
In reply to estivoautumnal:
Wrath.

Sx
patrick_b - on 22 Oct 2013
In reply to FesteringSore:
> (In reply to estivoautumnal)
> Beddgelert - Beedlegert
> Dolgellau - Dolgerlow

A friend of mine calls Dolgellau 'Dogladoo'

Sarah G on 22 Oct 2013
In reply to patrick_b:
Leverage.

It should be "leeverage", not "levverage"! You're in Britain, dammit!
JuneBob on 22 Oct 2013
In reply to estivoautumnal:
hyperbole
hiperbowl or hipurrboleee
Kimono - on 22 Oct 2013
In reply to JuneBob:
> (In reply to estivoautumnal)
> hyperbole
> hiperbowl or hipurrboleee

The latter of course.
There are people who say the former??
Cardi - on 22 Oct 2013
In reply to estivoautumnal:

Incorrect pronunciation 2nd
Llanberis - Lanberis, should start with an 'll'
Gogarth - Go-garff. The 'o' should be short and rhyme with 'bog'
Idwal - Id-wall. Short a, nothing to do with a wall!
Rigid Raider - on 22 Oct 2013
In reply to estivoautumnal:

Ikea pronounced "Eyekeea" when it should be "Eekayah"

Ibiza pronounced "Eyebeetha" when it should be "Ibeetha"

Iraq pronunced "Eyerack" when it should be "Irack"

Get my drift?

tlm - on 22 Oct 2013
In reply to mgco3:

> Himalayas - "Him a lay az" not "him are lee az"

And there was me thinking it was Himalaya - Him-ah-lay-ah

and for Al:
Peak - Peek, not peeks

tlm - on 22 Oct 2013
In reply to estivoautumnal:

Bowline - bow-lyn, not bow-line

lieutenant - lef-tenant, not lew-tenant
JJL - on 22 Oct 2013
In reply to estivoautumnal:

"Pronunciation"
Al Evans on 22 Oct 2013
In reply to JJL: I hate the way a lot of yanks pronounce nuclear as newcular, George Bush was annoyingly guilty of this.
Carolyn - on 22 Oct 2013
In reply to TobyA:

> Lots of amusing phonetic spellings in English though, from all the bilingual kids. I noticed "simballs" on my sons geography test this morning (symbols). That might be my accent to blame as well!

TBH, that happens with kids who only speak English, too. Can't remember how old yours are, but they're only really starting to make any attempt to get my older one to spell correctly at the start of juniors (7, nearly 8). Although the main battle is actually getting him to write anything down in the first place!
Kimono - on 22 Oct 2013
In reply to Al Evans:
> (In reply to JJL) I hate the way a lot of yanks pronounce nuclear as newcular, George Bush was annoyingly guilty of this.

The least of his very many sins
planetmarshall on 22 Oct 2013
In reply to Al Evans:
> (In reply to JJL) I hate the way a lot of yanks pronounce nuclear as newcular, George Bush was annoyingly guilty of this.

I hate the way modern Brits pronounce 'iron' as 'iorn'. It was 'iern' in the 12th century and that's the way I like it.

FesteringSore - on 22 Oct 2013
In reply to Al Evans:
> (In reply to JJL) I hate the way a lot of yanks pronounce nuclear as newcular,
And aloominum...grrrrr
planetmarshall on 22 Oct 2013
In reply to planetmarshall: Also, 'ax' predates 'ask' (it was used by Chaucer). So if you're using the latter you're doing it wrong.
Shani - on 22 Oct 2013
In reply to estivoautumnal:
> That aren't necessarily Americans just getting it wrong.
>
> Any others?

It's not just words, it's names. Historically, the first casualty of war is the truth. The first casualty of the Gulf War was the pronunciation of Colin Powell's forename.
Lusk - on 22 Oct 2013
In reply to planetmarshall:
> (In reply to Al Evans)
> [...]
>
> I hate the way modern Brits pronounce 'iron' as 'iorn'. It was 'iern' in the 12th century and that's the way I like it.

You look remarkably young for your age!! :-)
Tim Chappell - on 22 Oct 2013
In reply to estivoautumnal:


One of many reasons why Classic FM is unlistenable is people talking about the composer Bark. David Mellor (there's another reason) was always doing this.
MikeSP - on 22 Oct 2013
In reply to estivoautumnal: (I have been asked where lou-ga-bor-ouga is. Turn out she want to get to loughborough.
Tim Chappell - on 22 Oct 2013
In reply to dapoy:

Actually Lougabarouga strikes me as a big improvement!
MG - on 22 Oct 2013
In reply to dapoy: Idiot. It's Luffbruff
Tony Naylor on 22 Oct 2013
In reply to willexodus:
> Only to tw@ts.

No, I reckon if you routinely mispronounce words then most people you meet are going to think you're thick. Mind you, you could categorise everyone who thinks you're thick as a tw@t. That works.

Kimono - on 22 Oct 2013
In reply to Tony Naylor:
> (In reply to willexodus)
> [...]
>
> No, I reckon if you routinely mispronounce words then most people you meet are going to think you're thick. Mind you, you could categorise everyone who thinks you're thick as a tw@t. That works.

Or just not care what other people think of you?
Only a hill - on 22 Oct 2013
In reply to estivoautumnal:
Once had a customer at the Clachaig who pronounced Iona as Ten-N-A. He'd never heard it spoken out loud before, and yes, he was American.
Franco Cookson on 22 Oct 2013
In reply to Tony Naylor:

Anyone getting on their high-horse about pronOUnciation of words needs to get a grip. The history of English linguistics is ridiculous and any language is so massively fluid, protectionism is the preserve of the fool.

In any case, if there was a 'correct' pronunciation, mispronunciation would only show you were poorly educated, not thick.

YouR fighting a losing battle, on the side of a load of changes that were probably arbITArily introduced in the 18th century.
MG - on 22 Oct 2013
In reply to Franco Cookson: Yes but like spelling and writing style and so on there is, at any given time and in a particular context, a range that is deemed correct. Use language outside this range you come over as possibly ill-educated, or old fashioned, or American, or possibly even from Yorkshire.
duddjaco - on 22 Oct 2013
Scone
Bath
Grass
Tim Chappell - on 22 Oct 2013
People who say "It doesn't matter provided you make your meaning clear" seem to have the wrong idea to me. Using language well is an art. We wouldn't say that just any performance of a piece of music will do, provided we can tell what piece it is.

"Conflab" is an irritant.
drolex - on 22 Oct 2013
In reply to estivoautumnal: Alot of mountaineering terms from other languages are definately mis-prononced.
glayshayr for glacier
via fewata for via ferratta
beswoooon (or something) for bergschrund
Their are alot more then that, that your prononcing incorrectily.
Bjartur i Sumarhus on 22 Oct 2013
In reply to Thread: This is all trivial, it's the patois-isation (not sure how to pronounce that word I just made up) of our language that should be of concern, blud.
Johnny_Grunwald on 22 Oct 2013
In reply to estivoautumnal:

Scone rhymes with bone, tone, lone, phone, hone, zone, cone, and stone.

So there :-P
Siward on 22 Oct 2013
In reply to drolex:

Also Jewellery, pronounced Joo-el-er-ree, not (as is all too common) jool-er-ree.

Bjartur i Sumarhus on 22 Oct 2013
In reply to Siward: Remuneration as renumeration

and restauranteur when it should be restaurateur

highclimber - on 22 Oct 2013
In reply to drolex:
> (In reply to estivoautumnal) Alot of mountaineering terms from other languages are definately mis-prononced.
> glayshayr for glacier
> via fewata for via ferratta
> beswoooon (or something) for bergschrund
> Their are alot more then that, that your prononcing incorrectily.

Gouter pronounced goutier.
Fat Bumbly2 - on 22 Oct 2013
In reply to TobyA: I have wondered about the disadvantages English speaking children have with literacy due to the strange orthography. Playing guess the vowel and guess if it's single or double letters are lifelong pains in the usual. Must give the Finns a flyer. Or is that compensated for by all the noun cases?
Fat Bumbly2 - on 22 Oct 2013
I often hear sheep pronounced rhyming with neap instead of hip. Catch myself doing it sometimes.
Slugain Howff - on 22 Oct 2013
In reply to estivoautumnal:

It's not fechin' Cold Slaw it's coleslaw.
dunc56 - on 22 Oct 2013
In reply to Tom V:
> (In reply to estivoautumnal)
>
> sixth

Would you care to expand on this one ?
felt - on 22 Oct 2013
In reply to estivoautumnal:

I must apologise for my countrymen pronouncing Özil as Ohsil rather than Oet-tsil.
Tom V - on 22 Oct 2013
In reply to dunc56:

A lot of people, including well-paid TV presenters, pronounce it

"sikth", rather as if the full x is a bit too much trouble.
dunc56 - on 22 Oct 2013
In reply to Tom V:
> (In reply to dunc56)
>
> A lot of people, including well-paid TV presenters, pronounce it
>
> "sikth", rather as if the full x is a bit too much trouble.

Oh man !! I love you ! I hate that soooo much.
WyeValleyClimber - on 22 Oct 2013
In reply to MG:
> (In reply to Cheese Monkey)
> [...]
>
> No.
>
> And for the avoidance of doubt, it's an airport not a planeport.

Can you elaborate on exactly what is wrong with 'Train Station'? I think Cheese Monkey's point is valid and not so easily dismissed.
Surely we are refering to a place where a bus or train is temporarily stationary?
I've long suspected that the apparent irritation some folk have with 'train station' is a cultural meme rather than something underpinned by a technical misuse of language.
MG - on 22 Oct 2013
In reply to WyeValleyClimber:
> (In reply to MG)
> [...]
>
> Can you elaborate on exactly what is wrong with 'Train Station'?

Well it's a neologism that I don't like. Railway station was almost universal about 15-20 years ago.


https://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?content=railway+station%2Ctrain+station&year_start=1800&am...
MG - on 22 Oct 2013
kdr001 - on 22 Oct 2013
In reply to estivoautumnal:
This: * is not the same as a small cartoon Gaul.
DerwentDiluted - on 22 Oct 2013
In reply to Simon4:
> (In reply to all on this thread ) OK, smart arses, how do you pronounce the mountain in Scotland named "Liathach" then?

My Ma was taught rudimentary Gaelic by a Torridon crofter in the 50's, she always pronounces it as Leergach.
tlm - on 22 Oct 2013
In reply to MG:

> Well it's a neologism that I don't like. Railway station was almost universal about 15-20 years ago.

Do you call a radio a wireless and a car an automobile too? ;-)
MG - on 22 Oct 2013
In reply to tlm: Motor-car. What do you take me for!
Wee Davie - on 22 Oct 2013
In reply to estivoautumnal:

Got lost in Yorkshire recently and ended up in the Dog & Gun pub in Malsis. We were meant to be in the Dog & Gun pub in Oxenhope and hadn't realised that all pubs in Yorkshire are called the Dog & Gun.

Anyway, upon asking directions for the way back via *Keighley* my Scottish interpretation of that as something close to Ceilidh was well off the mark- it's actually pronounced 'Kiech-ley'. The word kiech, meaning sh1te in Scottish...
estivoautumnal - on 22 Oct 2013
WyeValleyClimber - on 22 Oct 2013

> Well it's a neologism that I don't like. Railway station was almost universal about 15-20 years ago.

Hmmm. Not so much a 'mispronounciation' then as a de facto standard English usage that you happen not to like.
WyeValleyClimber - on 22 Oct 2013
In reply to estivoautumnal:
> (In reply to MG)
>
> This is worth a read.
>
> http://www.grumpyoldsod.com/railway%20station.asp

Now I understand - its a reactionary article of faith!
I love the way the first paragraph of the homepage implicitly compares its targets to Nazism. Cuts straight to the chase there then - you might normally expect at least some preamble before evoking this classic internet debate tactic.
Ben Sharp - on 22 Oct 2013
In reply to estivoautumnal: some of the comments on this post just sound like a bunch of privileged wankers ripping the piss out of people who didn't enjoy the same education as they did.

Esspresso/expresso is light hearted pedantry, ask/aks is just ripping the piss out of people with dyslexia.
Wee Davie - on 22 Oct 2013
In reply to Ben Sharp:

>ask/aks is just ripping the piss out of people with dyslexia.

Bulldish.

'Aks' is people trying to be 'down with the hood' and thus demands they have it ripped out them. Nathan Barley mofos.
estivoautumnal - on 22 Oct 2013
In reply to Ben Sharp:

I thought dyslexia was reading and writing and not pronunciation?

My education consisted of primary school followed by state secondary school. Hardly Eton.
avictimoftheDrpsycho - on 22 Oct 2013
In reply to Ben Sharp:
> (In reply to estivoautumnal) some of the comments on this post just sound like a bunch of privileged wankers ripping the piss out of people who didn't enjoy the same education as they did.

+1


TheseKnivesMan - on 22 Oct 2013
In reply to estivoautumnal:

I don't usually care about this kind of thing much but when some English people pronounce Year not like "yeer" but more like "YUUUUUUHH"

F*ck that is hideous don't you think?


TheseKnivesMan - on 22 Oct 2013
In reply to DerwentDiluted:

Lee-uh-hach
TheseKnivesMan - on 22 Oct 2013
In reply to estivoautumnal:

Also, people ofte pronounce Coire An-t Sneachda as "Shnechta", me included, whereas it should really be "Corrie an-t'nech-kuh"
Dave Garnett - on 22 Oct 2013
In reply to WyeValleyClimber:
> (In reply to MG)
> I've long suspected that the apparent irritation some folk have with 'train station' is a cultural meme rather than something underpinned by a technical misuse of language.

You're right, but all good diction is a cultural meme. 'Train station' is perfectly comprehensible and there's absolutely no problem with using it, as long as you don't mind sounding as though you don't know any better.
MG - on 22 Oct 2013
In reply to estivoautumnal: Hes just a grumpy sod who happens to be right about one thing. Did you see above how usage has changed?
Alyson - on 22 Oct 2013
In reply to Jonny2vests:
> (In reply to Trangia)
> [...]
>
> Have you ever tried ordering a Latte in Italy though?

My husband did this in the Dolomites. He got a funny look and a cup of hot milk.
ads.ukclimbing.com
Lusk - on 22 Oct 2013
In reply to TheseKnivesMan:
> (In reply to estivoautumnal)
>
> Also, people ofte pronounce Coire An-t Sneachda as "Shnechta", me included, whereas it should really be "Corrie an-t'nech-kuh"

But was is it in Glaswegian? :-)
felt - on 22 Oct 2013
In reply to Alyson:
> (In reply to Jonny2vests)
> [...]
>
> My husband did this in the Dolomites. He got a funny look and a cup of hot milk.

After a trip to Mumbai, my wife ordered a lassi in Boise, Idaho, and was given a collie.
dominic lee - on 22 Oct 2013
In reply to estivoautumnal: Surely thats pispronounced worms...
Enty - on 22 Oct 2013
In reply to estivoautumnal:

The pronounciation of scone has nowt to do with how it's spelt it's to do with how posh you are.

Right, I'm off for a bokkle of wine.

E
Ali.B - on 22 Oct 2013
In reply to estivoautumnal:

Marylebone not Marlybone
altirando - on 22 Oct 2013
In reply to drolex: Yes, one very irritating one - abSAIL for abseil. No yachting involved. But nonclimbing, a very lazy 'bought' for brought. No sale involved!
Mediocre Scientist - on 22 Oct 2013
In reply to Enty:
> (In reply to estivoautumnal)
>
> The pronounciation of scone has nowt to do with how it's spelt it's to do with how posh you are.
>
> Right, I'm off for a bokkle of wine.
>
> E

You could just put the kekkle on.

(I also like digikle and hospikle)
GnT - on 22 Oct 2013
In reply to altirando:
> abSAIL for abseil
How would you like it pronounced?

G
Cardi - on 22 Oct 2013
In reply to Mediocre Scientist:

and sanguidge
Enty - on 22 Oct 2013
In reply to GnT:

seil rhymes with heil as in sieg heil. Dummy ;)

E
Franco Cookson on 23 Oct 2013
In reply to MG:
> (In reply to Franco Cookson) Yes but like spelling and writing style and so on there is, at any given time and in a particular context, a range that is deemed correct. Use language outside this range you come over as possibly ill-educated, or old fashioned, or American, or possibly even from Yorkshire.


Yeh, but I think it's important to state on a thread that is all about 'right' and 'wrong', that it's totally arbitrary. There are current norms, but they only exist due to past changes and will certainly change in the future. On the one hand there needs to be a certain level of protectionism in order for there to be any kind of consensus and thus transference of meaning, but on the other hand you have things like 'train station'. I mean, that is never going to go back. And to pretend to take some kind of learned overview of the situation and condemn the change just shows ignorance.
Franco Cookson on 23 Oct 2013
In reply to Franco Cookson:

On the other points, a lot of what people (particularly in the north) consider to be 'posh' is actually not received/royal pronunciation. Things like long 'a' in 'garage' or 'scone' rhyming with bone are generally the sign of someone poorly educated wishing to be socially upwardly mobile (the most embarrassing position of all perhaps?!).
Dave Garnett - on 23 Oct 2013
In reply to Franco Cookson:
> (In reply to MG)
> [...]
>
>
> to pretend to take some kind of learned overview of the situation and condemn the change just shows ignorance.

Not ignorance, disapproval, and tongue in cheek at that! You're probably right though, time will tell.

wercat on 23 Oct 2013
In reply to Franco Cookson:

you do like inaccurate generalisations
Fat Bumbly2 - on 23 Oct 2013
The weans pull me up for Bunsen, they prefer Bünsen.

I dont care as long as they use them properly (some hope).
CharlieMack - on 23 Oct 2013
In reply to estivoautumnal:

Sikth instead of sixth.
Secertry instead of of secretary.
felt - on 23 Oct 2013
In reply to Fat Bumbly2:

Tell them they're wrong.
MG - on 23 Oct 2013
In reply to Franco Cookson: Do you think you are maybe taking this more seriously than some other posters?
dunc56 - on 23 Oct 2013
In reply to altirando:
> (In reply to drolex) Yes, one very irritating one - abSAIL for abseil. No yachting involved. But nonclimbing, a very lazy 'bought' for brought. No sale involved!

I would also like to hear exactly how you pronounce this please.
dunc56 - on 23 Oct 2013
In reply to Franco Cookson:
> (In reply to MG)
> [...]
>
>
> Yeh, but I think it's important to state on a thread that is all about 'right' and 'wrong', that it's totally arbitrary.

Of course it is - one man's E10 classic in the back of beyond is another man's E5 waste of time :)
drolex - on 23 Oct 2013
In reply to dunc56: "Abzile" (rhymes with exile)
PaulHermes - on 23 Oct 2013
In reply to estivoautumnal: Snowdon and NOT bloody Mount Snowdon
nufkin - on 23 Oct 2013
In reply to estivoautumnal:

'or-e-GAR-no' instead if 'or-EGG-a-no'

'PAP-ri-ka' instead of 'pa-PRI-ka'



(the latter is right for both of these. Obviously)
nufkin - on 23 Oct 2013
In reply to nufkin:

ooh, also 'Anastazi' instead of 'Anasazi'
Franco Cookson on 23 Oct 2013
In reply to MG:
> (In reply to Franco Cookson) Do you think you are maybe taking this more seriously than some other posters?

I thought I was taking it less seriously, but maybe you're right? I know a lot of people who actually get very irate about this kind of thing, so I appologise if everyone who's replied to this thread was just having a laugh, doesn't actually care and I have taken them all too seriously.

Dialects and sociolects are really interesting to study. It's amazing what economic pressures can arbitrarily colour one variety negatively.
MG - on 23 Oct 2013
In reply to Franco Cookson:
> (In reply to MG)
> [...]
>
> I thought I was taking it less seriously, but maybe you're right? I know a lot of people who actually get very irate about this kind of thing, so I appologise if everyone who's replied to this thread was just having a laugh, doesn't actually care and I have taken them all too seriously.
>

I still talk to people who say train station. I may even smile.


> Dialects and sociolects are really interesting to study. It's amazing what economic pressures can arbitrarily colour one variety negatively.

True. There is a reason why so many brummies lose their accent when they move I suspect

adam11 - on 23 Oct 2013
Testrasetta - testicle stretcher

also

Fink (lazy slob) - think.
Enty - on 23 Oct 2013
In reply to MG:

I'll be going to the train station on Saturday? What's the problem with train station?

E
MG - on 23 Oct 2013
In reply to Enty: See links above. It's a new term.
MG - on 23 Oct 2013
In reply to Enty: Aren't you in France? Gare surely?
ads.ukclimbing.com
stewieatb on 23 Oct 2013
In reply to Alyson:
> (In reply to Jonny2vests)
> [...]
>
> My husband did this in the Dolomites. He got a funny look and a cup of hot milk.

I thought this was an urban myth, but obviously not. Another explanation might be that Italian baristas enjoy trolling ignorant tourists ;)
Enty - on 23 Oct 2013
In reply to MG:
> (In reply to Enty) Aren't you in France? Gare surely?

I came back for a week as I was missing the grit and I haven't seen any sunshine yet.

E
estivoautumnal - on 23 Oct 2013
In reply to nufkin:
> (In reply to estivoautumnal)
>
> 'or-e-GAR-no' instead if 'or-EGG-a-no'
>


That's an American thing though. A bit like bayzil and erbs.
Dominion - on 23 Oct 2013
In reply to estivoautumnal:

> Any others?


Alumium

was the original name (in 1808) by it's discoverer, but was later amended by him to Aluminum (in 1812)

But a bit later in 1812, some anonymous person objected to Aluminum, and proposed Aluminium.

As far as I know that person didn't rant and rail against Platinum, Tantalum, or Molybdenum - all of which pre-date Alumium - though. Or Platinium, Molybdenium and Tantalium (as they are not known, nowadays)


Don't you just hate anonymous posters?


||-)

andrewmcleod - on 23 Oct 2013
In reply to Submit to Gravity:
> (In reply to highclimber)
> [...]
>
> If the Welsh want people to pronounce their words correctly they should use some bloody vowels occasionally!

How many do you want!

Betws-y-coed

That 5 vowels in 10 letters, 50% of the word is vowels :)
estivoautumnal - on 23 Oct 2013
In reply to andrewmcleod:

Rhythms.

Any Welsh words of 7 letters with no vowels?
Enty - on 23 Oct 2013
In reply to MG:
> (In reply to Enty) See links above. It's a new term.


Is it? I'm sure I went to the train statin as a boy.

E
Wolfy1987 NEWMC - on 24 Oct 2013
In reply to estivoautumnal: jalapeño pronounced with a J. It's pronounced with a H as in Halapeño
felt - on 24 Oct 2013
In reply to Wolfy1987 NEWMC:

or habanero pronounced as habañero

This is a pretty interesting page
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hyperforeignism
dunc56 - on 24 Oct 2013
In reply to drolex:
> (In reply to dunc56) "Abzile" (rhymes with exile)

Ok and which language does it come from ?
Jimbo C - on 24 Oct 2013
In reply to Al Evans:
> (In reply to JJL) I hate the way a lot of yanks pronounce nuclear as newcular, George Bush was annoyingly guilty of this.

Yes, that's the one that came to my mind. I would love to have been able to punch his little chubby face for every time he said 'newcular' on air. He was the guy with his finger on the button - for God's sake say the word properly!

tlm - on 24 Oct 2013
In reply to dunc56:
> (In reply to drolex)
> [...]
>
> Ok and which language does it come from ?

Come on Dunc56! Haven't you learned to google yet?

"Origin:

1930s: from German abseilen, from ab 'down' + Seil 'rope'"
In reply to andrewmcleod:
> (In reply to Submit to Gravity)
> [...]
>
> How many do you want!
>
> Betws-y-coed
>
> That 5 vowels in 10 letters, 50% of the word is vowels :)

I can only count 3) Is "y" a vowel?
In reply to estivoautumnal: I have to say that some of the posting on here has been a little over the top. The "I can't f*cking believe people mis-pronounce 'nckjsdnckjcn'" ones I mean.
nufkin - on 24 Oct 2013
In reply to Enty:

> What's the problem with train station?

why not just say 'station'? It's probably clear from the context what you mean - I'd expect most people would automatically assume you meant rail/train station, as opposed to, say, a bus station. Unless you're talking to police or fire types, but again that'd be context
nufkin - on 24 Oct 2013
In reply to estivoautumnal:

> That's an American thing though.

I thought so too, but I asked someone from Italy what they said and apparently 'or-REG-a-no' it is

(I figured that an Italian is automatically more of an authority than a Britisher because oregano seems like a Mediterraneany plant)
altirando - on 24 Oct 2013
In reply to GnT: Correctly. Try looking at a German dictionary.
eschaton - on 24 Oct 2013
In reply to estivoautumnal: ski should be pronounced SHEE not SKEE
andrewmcleod - on 24 Oct 2013
In reply to Submit to Gravity:

Yes, as is w (in this context) :)
Roguevfr - on 25 Oct 2013
In reply to estivoautumnal:
The things that I keep my clothes in are drawers, not "draws".
Also, a colleague of mine always says "proberly" instead of probably. It makes me irritable.
Rigid Raider - on 25 Oct 2013
In reply to estivoautumnal:

Most annoying of all is the fashion for dropping your Ts:

Forgo'en, bo'om, wo'evva, spo'ed, bo'le, no'ed, compensa'ed..... and so on.

a lakeland climber on 25 Oct 2013
In reply to Submit to Gravity:

"y" & "w" are always vowels in Welsh.

ALC
Tom V - on 25 Oct 2013
In reply to Roguevfr:

Mirrow
Laura Norder
dunc56 - on 25 Oct 2013
In reply to tlm:
> (In reply to dunc56)
> [...]
>
> Come on Dunc56! Haven't you learned to google yet?
>
> "Origin:
>
> 1930s: from German abseilen, from ab 'down' + Seil 'rope'"

I know that - I was making a point - and how does one pronounce ab in German ?
ablackett - on 25 Oct 2013
In reply to Tom V: Clover Hitch. Arghhh.
nufkin - on 25 Oct 2013
In reply to ablackett:

> Clover Hitch

I think that sounds quite sweet. A bit like an Alpine Buttercup knot

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