/ Simond Decathlon alpinism 300 £149 winter boots

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Spudt - on 29 Oct 2013
Decathlon have these tasty looking Simond lightweight winter boots, anyone used them? Are they warm and waterproof enough for winter in Scotland? Stiff enough for up to grade III perhaps? Thanks.

http://www.decathlon.co.uk/alpinism-300-mountaineering-boots-grey-id_8029009.html

jazzyjackson on 29 Oct 2013
In reply to Spudt:
Look nice.

Traction
Vibram® sole. Compatible with semi-automatic and strap crampons
Nordie_matt - on 29 Oct 2013
In reply to Spudt:

It's a bit strange that they say crampon compatible but don't provide the b rating if the boot. Also in product restrictions it states "not suitable of winter or high altitude nountaineering".

I would be sceptical over the versitility of the boot without actually holding one and getting the full specs. Ideally the boot should be b2 for winter.
martinph78 on 29 Oct 2013
In reply to jazzyjackson: To be honest, I think they look horrid. Might just be the photo, but I don't reckon they look very durable!

You can get the Scarpa Manta for £160-ish if you shop around for the old version. I reckon that would be a better buy (if it fits).
Nordie_matt - on 29 Oct 2013
In reply to Nordie_matt:

Sorry about the typos, I have replied via mobile phone.

Matt
danwilliams99 - on 29 Oct 2013
In reply to Spudt: There's a bit more info here: http://www.simond.com/en/cat/Shoes/prd/Chaussure_Alpinism_300_Noir
as well as a review here:
http://www.outdoorsmagic.com/forum/gear/review---quecha/simond-alpinism-300/48731.html
Which makes them sound like they might be half decent.
In reply to Nordie_matt:

> It's a bit strange that they say crampon compatible but don't provide the b rating if the boot.

The B/C rating was invented as rough guide by a British mountain guide. I think the chap, Brian Hall, was working for Berghaus at the time whilst Berghaus still did Scarpa boots in the UK, as the system was used with Scarpas first.

Anyway, its not an international system and its only meant as general guide. Modern boots and modern crampons have change also, so I guess its even more of an over-generalisation now than in the mid-90s when Brian came up with the idea.
CurlyStevo - on 29 Oct 2013
In reply to Nordie_matt:
"not suitable of winter or high altitude mountaineering".

I think they are meaning Alpine Winter or High Altitude, but yes if you read the disclaimer literally, (which may well be deliberate to cover their backs) they don't seem very usefull.

Nordie_matt - on 29 Oct 2013
In reply to TobyA

Fair enough, I wasn't aware of that. Just out if curiosity, what is your take on the not compatible for winter mountaineering in the context of the uk? ( the high altitude bit is a bit obvious regarding the boots limitations)

Matt
cleofis99 - on 29 Oct 2013
In reply to Spudt: I've had a pair of these for about 6 months, not used them in Anger yet, but they are a boot that fit my feet really well, the price was right, they feel nice and sturdy and are built really soild. pretty light as well.

As I say I've not ventured in to the cold in them yet but they'll be getting a work out come winter.
In reply to Nordie_matt: The Decathlon website has loads of weird recommendations and exclusions on it, I suspect mostly written by copy writers who don't know much about the sports then translated into English by people who don't know much about the sports!

They look fine for hill walking/easy winter climbing if they hold a crampon securely. Might be alright for moderate ice if they don't bend much.
Spudt - on 30 Oct 2013
In reply to Spudt: Thanks for all that, the boots feel light and stiff in the shop. Certainly a good bit lighter than my old Nepal tops. Reckon I will give them a go for long winter walks and easy snow routes.
xplorer on 30 Oct 2013
In reply to Nordie_matt:

There lightweight alpine boots not winter boots.

Just like the la sportiva evo gtx

They have no insulation
In reply to xplorer:

> There lightweight alpine boots not winter boots.
>
> Just like the la sportiva evo gtx
>
> They have no insulation

You get plenty of ice climbing boots that don't have additional layers of insulation, my normal ones don't for instance. Winter is a vague term, what boots work well I suppose depends on where you are and what you are doing.
Juki - on 30 Oct 2013
In reply to Nordie_matt:
> It's a bit strange that they say crampon compatible but don't provide the b rating if the boot. Also in product restrictions it states "not suitable of winter or high altitude nountaineering".

B-rating is something that's mainly used in UK. These shoes are mainly for the continental markets so there's no B-rating. The crampon recommendatios are on the safe side too. Almost all the boots are "compatible with semi-automatic and strap crampons" but in real life you can use many of the stiff boots with any crampons that fit well.

Almost all the climbing and mountaineering clothes that are not insulated have the "not suitable of winter or high altitude nountaineering" marking. Waterproof shells are one of the exceptions.

If you go to Decathlon and check their running shoes you can quite often find a marking "not suitable for tennis".

Scotsken on 30 Oct 2013
In reply to Juki:
I've got a pair, have used them for Vdiff rock climbing and scrambling in the UK and they were very good. They are comfy and lightweight. They are also made in Italy, a country with a long history of making quality footwear.

I wouldn't use them for front pointing but they are stiff enough to hold a C2 crampon and would be great for french technique. They would be just the ticket for summer alpine climbing or UK winter walking with the addition of some kind of gaiter.
AG - on 30 Oct 2013
In reply to xplorer: I've started using my spotivas for winter walking/ grade 1 gullies...much more comfortable than my usual winter boots. Ok if your going fast.
Simond stuff is usually quite good.
ads.ukclimbing.com
PN82 - on 21 Nov 2013
In reply to Spudt:

The Simond boots are of comparable stiffness to La Sportiva Trango Evo S or Scarpa Rebel lites (i.e stiffer than B1 but pushing being called B2 - i refer to them as B1.5 as they will take grivel airtech or G12's if there is a flex bar, but you don't really want to be front pointing on any of these boots!) They were £99 a year ago which is an absolute steal, £150 i think is too much for these. As mentioned above you can get boots such as the mantas, trangos for a similar price on various outdoor websites. The Decathlon boots are ideal for Scottish winter walking, alpine glacier/mountain walking up to 3800m, not ideal for higher altitudes, standing around on a belay ledge for hours in deepest darkest Scottish winter!

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