/ Gas cartridges in patagonia (Chile)

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Sam C - on 30 Oct 2013
Was intending on taking a multifuel stove to Patagonia. However have been informed you can buy gas cartridges for pocket rocket, jet boil etc over there. Anyone got any experience of this?

Cheers in advance
sheelba - on 31 Oct 2013
In reply to Sam C:
Depends where you go. You can get them in Punta Areanas and Puerto Natales although I remember hunting around a bit as it was a sunday. I would presume the same would be the case for the puerto montt area there all pretty popular and touristy. Anywhere else I would guess would be unlikely.

enjoy, it's an amazing part of the world
sheelba - on 31 Oct 2013
In reply to Sam C: Feel free to get in contact with any other questions. I lived in Chile for a while.
George Allan - on 02 Nov 2013
In reply to Sam C: A warning. Check the thread on your burner fits the gas cartridges before you buy any. In some years ago in Bolivia we didn't!!
George
mcrtchly - on 03 Nov 2013
According to the Cicerone guide "For stocking up before a trek, there is a decent-sized supermarket on Baquedano, and two fruit and vegetable shops almost opposite. One block further along, also on Baquedano, there is an excellent little shop selling a wide range of dried fruit perfect for hiking."

We're hiking the W route in Torres del Paine later this month and also hope to screw type gas canisters there. I understand that only gas stoves are allowed (not liquid fuel) and you have to cook in designated areas because of the fire risk. They seem very strict on this; even according to one traveller asking you to recite the park regulations.
James Gilbert on 03 Nov 2013
In reply to Sam C:

Had absolutely no problems finding screw-type gas cartridges in Argentinian Patagonia. El Calafate is full of camping/outdoors shops. I imagine it's the same in Puerto Natales.
winhill - on 03 Nov 2013
sheelba - on 03 Nov 2013
In reply to Sam C:

Yes Puerto Natales has various small supermarkets, outdoor shops and places to stock up on food. Although I'd take food with you are as choice is limited and it's more expensive than in centres of population. We were comfortably under-weigh on the plane from Santiago with 12 days of food in our packs.

A Czech trekker burnt down a large area of pristine woodland a few years ago creating a huge fire with a camping stove so that is presumably why regulations have become stricter.

Not sure what the link to Doite is for. They are a Chilean outdoor brand that makes poor quality, cheap gear, leaky tents etc (although I have a Doite hat I'm rather fond of). They don't tend to have their own shops although there is one in Santiago.
winhill - on 03 Nov 2013
In reply to sheelba:
> (In reply to Sam C)
>
> Not sure what the link to Doite is for. They are a Chilean outdoor brand that makes poor quality, cheap gear, leaky tents etc (although I have a Doite hat I'm rather fond of). They don't tend to have their own shops although there is one in Santiago.

their gas is ubiquitous.

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