/ my local mountain rescue team

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RockAngel on 08 Nov 2013
Found this while browsing my local news

http://www.macclesfield-express.co.uk/news/local-news/fundraising-blitz-aid-buxton-mountain-6274452

One of the team members is my former 'boss' when I was volunteering with the ranger service
fmck - on 10 Nov 2013
In reply to RockAngel:

Why do they call themselfves the mountain rescue team when there area covers a forest with highest elevation 475m. They don't have any mountains ! Kind of think its an important element for a mountain rescue team.
muppetfilter - on 10 Nov 2013
In reply to fmck: I don't think you will care what they call themselves when they give up their time to help others.
Out of curiosity when next you suffer a compound fracture of the Femur and you are looking at a jagged hunk of bone protruding from your thigh will you decline help due to some minor semantics of nomenclature ?
Welsh Kate - on 10 Nov 2013
In reply to fmck:
Collins: "a natural upward projection of the earth's surface, higher and steeper than a hill and often having a rocky summit"
Oxford: "a large natural elevation of the earth’s surface rising abruptly from the surrounding level; a large steep hill"

JamButty - on 10 Nov 2013
In reply to fmck:
> (In reply to RockAngel)
>
> Why do they call themselfves the mountain rescue team when there area covers a forest with highest elevation 475m. They don't have any mountains ! Kind of think its an important element for a mountain rescue team.

Yawn, get back on your own thread......
joan cooper - on 10 Nov 2013
In reply to fmck: To be fair they do a hell of a lot on grit. As you will see if you read their call out log.
fmck - on 11 Nov 2013
In reply to Welsh Kate:

Ah so this is what the English call mountains. North of the border we refer to it as upland moor.

"Higher and steeper than a hill" erm I think you will have to call it a hill.

I don't believe people are so ignorant but anyone wanting to call themselves a mountain rescue team is I suppose no harm. Albeit if you were in London you could form a MRT for high rise flats and tower blocks.
Andy DB - on 11 Nov 2013
In reply to fmck: It's generally to draw everyone in line with a nationally accepted convention. There used to be teams call Fell rescue etc but it was generally decided that it was better to have a more unified name so it was clear that all teams were from the same organisation and preformed the same sort of functions.

A bit like every county has "County name fire and rescue service" I would be confusing if one county had "North Yorkshire Fire extinguishing organisation" Where as Oxford had "The vehicle extraction and fire prevention team for Oxfordshire.
Blinder - on 11 Nov 2013
In reply to fmck: get a f@@king grip. Who cares what they are called, they have been called out 64 times this year. They do a bloody good job.
RockAngel on 11 Nov 2013
In reply to fmck: There are plenty of locations that this team assist on, that are completely inaccessable to road vehicles and therefore ambulance crews. If I was in need of their assistance, I wouldnt tell them to go away because there arent any mountains in the vicinity. Thats just being pathetically pedantic!
Trangia - on 11 Nov 2013
In reply to fmck:
> (In reply to RockAngel)
>
> Why do they call themselfves the mountain rescue team when there area covers a forest with highest elevation 475m. They don't have any mountains ! Kind of think its an important element for a mountain rescue team.


Didn't you know?

"Size isn't everything!!"

I always remember the advice given to me by the late Jim Cameron, Mountain Guide when I was learning to climb in the 1960s.

"You can kill yourself just as dead from falling 30 ft as you will falling 3,000 ft"
fmck - on 11 Nov 2013
In reply to Trangia:
> (In reply to fmck)
> [...]
>
>
> Didn't you know?
>
> "Size isn't everything!!"
>
>
>
> "You can kill yourself just as dead from falling 30 ft as you will falling 3,000 ft"

It would appear to be the case down there you may refer to a door step as a mountain!
No one is questioning the resourcefulness of these individuals and clearly good cause they do.
I was just curious to know what folks down that neck of the woods refer to as mountains.



Trangia - on 11 Nov 2013
In reply to fmck:
> (In reply to Trangia)
> [...]
>
> It would appear to be the case down there you may refer to a door step as a mountain!
>

I've heard that there is even a Romney Marsh Mountain Rescue Team. It apparently rarely gets a call out, but it's comforting to think that it is there if need.

The Marsh can be a dangerous place at night, there are few smugglers these days, but horseless headmen are seen from time to time galloping through the mist.
Katie86 - on 11 Nov 2013
In reply to fmck:

This is not the first thread that you have slated MRT - go crawl back under your stone or wander in your upland areas of choice - don't break a leg!
SteveD - on 11 Nov 2013
In reply to fmck: It's all relative mate, I lived briefly in Austria, my bathroom was higher than the Ben.
DerwentDiluted - on 11 Nov 2013
In reply to fmck:

I share your outrage, auxiliary emergency services bearing nationally convenient and descriptive titles which ultimately fail to adequately convey geographical and topographical nuance are the curse of the age.

Only this summer I was on a beach in the Gower 'protected' by the so-called Royal National Lifeboat Institute. Imagine my horror and disappointment as not a lifeboat was to be seen, only a couple of jet skis and a hilux truck. Not only that but there was nobody Royal anywhere, nor do I think that as beach hiut can really be described as an 'Institute'. I think it's about time somebody stood up to these charlatans and held them to true semantic account.
Jonny2vests - on 12 Nov 2013
In reply to fmck:

Scotland isn't exactly high altitude either.
Slugain Howff - on 12 Nov 2013
In reply to Katie86:
> (In reply to fmck)
>
> This is not the first thread that you have slated MRT - go crawl back under your stone or wander in your upland areas of choice - don't break a leg!

Indeed - not sure what his problem is.

S

RockAngel on 12 Nov 2013
In reply to Blinder: i wanted to highlight that this team were fundraising and have been in existence for 50 years. They are called out quite a lot & need the equipment specific to the terrain here. They are reliant on fundraising for equipment & training and have been caled out 64 times so far this year. This area is popular with walkers & climbers & there are areas inaccessible to vehicles. Regardles of the highest point in the area, they do a lot of good & need some support, so stop your bickering over semantics and i hope you lot will pop a few pence into the collection tins
fmck - on 13 Nov 2013
In reply to Slugain Howff:

Internet entertainment. Steady stream of ranting youngs !
Orgsm on 13 Nov 2013
In reply to fmck:

The upland moors would still whip your ass boy.
jepotherepo - on 13 Nov 2013
In reply to fmck:

You justly deserve the vitriolic replies.

The skills required rescuing someone cragfast, lost upon a featureless moor in the clag, fallen off a mountainbike or just having slipped on a a hillside path and fracturing their ankle aer obciously completely different in the peak district compared to any other remote and exposed environment....

Perhaps you should have a peek at where Buxton team actually covers too as its not just Macclesfield Forest and Shutlingsloe.

By way of apology you could perhaps give a donation to a team that costs nearly £30000 a year to keep going.

Better still you should join your local team and donate your time and energy rather than wasting it trolling.

Dan_S - on 13 Nov 2013
In reply to fmck:
> (In reply to Slugain Howff)
>
> Internet entertainment. Steady stream of ranting youngs !

I think it's just that you're a snide, unpleasant individual to be honest, you're not endearing yourself to anyone.

You seem to be woefully ill informed about what MR is all about, so if you have the skills and experience not to be a liability, any MR team would appreciate you volunteering to be a "casualty" on a training exercise. Why don't you do that, see what being an MR team member actually involves, and experience the work done first hand.
Andy Say - on 14 Nov 2013
In reply to Trangia:
> (In reply to fmck)
> [...]
>
> I've heard that there is even a Romney Marsh Mountain Rescue Team. It apparently rarely gets a call out, but it's comforting to think that it is there if need.
>


Trueish - But 'The team only allows members who were born in Kent because of the dangerous nature of the mountains local knowledge is esentual (sic)'

I think you'll find that its a joke.
fmck - on 15 Nov 2013
In reply to Dan_S:

It always seems you have ignorant people who don't even read threads properly. Make statements that are personal insults rather than contribute because they dumbly read a couple of lines. Possibly the previous retard statement was a line he of thought he followed. Dear oh.

Mountain = what.

This was the line for the hard of learning. We seem to be in agreement that south of the border we could be looking at an area of promanence such as a pile of garden waste etc.

It's not something to be ashamed of but playing at is an important process of growing up.
wintertree - on 15 Nov 2013
In reply to fmck:

> It's not something to be ashamed of but playing at is an important process of growing up.

Are you playing at the internets after your bed time?

If it make you feel any better our local team is a "Search and Mountain Resue Team". South of your precious border and the hills aren't mountains but they have mountai terrain and mountain weather - both of which contribute to the local environment that causes incidents. A lot of your little Scottish mountains are easier to cover ground on than some of our peat hag ridden bogs, which are more fearsome than any I've seen in the mountains.
tom_in_edinburgh - on 15 Nov 2013
In reply to fmck:
> (In reply to Dan_S)
>
> Mountain = what.
>

AFAIK there's an official UK government definition of mountain that says it needs to be 600m or more above sea level. Doesn't mean it's any easier to rescue people from lower ground though.

Dan_S - on 15 Nov 2013
In reply to fmck:

If you genuinely believe MR is just playing, go out with a team and show them how easy it actually is.

MR teams train to the same standards across the whole of England and wales, as they can be called upon to support other teams nationally as required. It doesn't matter whether their normal operational area has whatever you'd personally classify as a mountain, MR teams are expected to be able to operate in that sort if terrain.
Carolyn - on 15 Nov 2013
In reply to Dan_S:

> MR teams train to the same standards across the whole of England and wales, as they can be called upon to support other teams nationally as required. It doesn't matter whether their normal operational area has whatever you'd personally classify as a mountain, MR teams are expected to be able to operate in that sort if terrain.

Really? There are some broad guidelines, but apart from Casualty Care, isn't that about it?
RockAngel on 15 Nov 2013
In reply to Dan_S: well, I'm glad you're all arguing about Mountain Rescue teams but I hope you're all putting money into the coffers too. One day you may need them.
Dan_S - on 15 Nov 2013
In reply to Carolyn:

As far as I was aware, (i.e. I was told, whilst I was a probationer chasing a lad from Brecon team up the side of a hill/mountain/earthy protrusion in wales last October on my first multi-team call out) there is a certain set of skills, set out by MREW that all it's full members should have, ropework, belays and anchors, water (bank side) rescue, navigation, comms/airwave, RAF SAR familiarisation, BLS and defib theory etc.

These "core skills" are backed up my more specific skills done as "opt in" training like Swift water rescue, Crag rescue (e.g. Rigging for rescue/Oldham method) and the Cas Care certificate.

I'm pretty sure that's what I've been told my our training officer too. Certainly the "Core skills" training sessions are mandatory, and there are often MREW syllabuses flashed up on the projector. The more recent jobs involving other teams, there's always been the assumption that I knew what to do when given a task, so I have no reason to think this isn't true.
Dan_S - on 15 Nov 2013
In reply to RockAngel:
> (In reply to Dan_S) well, I'm glad you're all arguing about Mountain Rescue teams but I hope you're all putting money into the coffers too. One day you may need them.


Yep, I'm currently not hill fit so I can't go on call outs, so I'll be doing my bit with some of our supporters rattling tins and collecting much needed donations tomorrow.
fmck - on 16 Nov 2013
In reply to

You should add being very apt at blowing yer own trumpet as well.
mikebarter387 - on 16 Nov 2013
In reply to RockAngel:
Picked up my daughter and stopped by to watch her mom work. She was staging at the edge of town on the way home. Height of the summer this goes on three times a day. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XE8QHOGDcyY



aln - on 17 Nov 2013
In reply to fmck: You should add being adept at making yourself sound like a tit. No profile, what a surprise.
fmck - on 17 Nov 2013
In reply to mikebarter387:

You have the making of a good advert for possibly gaining funding to buy a helicopter to can all fit in. Touching little film.
fmck - on 17 Nov 2013
In reply to aln:

I don't want to start some personal insult fight aln but it sounds like you might be better placed spouting venom at teenagers on Facebook. Look at the nice video and stop acting lilies a venomous. Tit.
Jim C - on 17 Nov 2013
In reply to fmck:
> (In reply to RockAngel)
>
> Why do they call themselfves the mountain rescue team when there area covers a forest with highest elevation 475m. They don't have any mountains ! Kind of think its an important element for a mountain rescue team.

I have been out in snow wind and rain helping MRT ( in Scotland)
We were looking for a friend (who was found dead the next day)
He was found at under 475m .

A lot of accidents also happen on a descent, not at the top of mountains, so I would have no issues with what my rescuer calls themselves, North or South of the border.

The last rescue I saw in Scotland was on Conic Hill, ( 350 M) a woman broke her ankle.
She was not even on the top of this small hill, but the chopper landed on the top , and it was easier to carry her to the top to get her off.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/22776031@N05/sets/72157624638908465/
HardenClimber - on 17 Nov 2013
In reply to fmck:
Hopefully no one would have a problem being helped by CRO (Cave Rescue Organisation)after an accident high on Penyghent.
Or being fished out of Dowbergill Passage by the Upper Wharfedale Fell Rescue Association.
(Though it is always a little confusing that the Yorkshire Dales CRO just call themselves CRO & everywhere else has a location in their name...)
ByEek - on 19 Nov 2013
In reply to fmck: Your comments clearly show that you have no knowledge of the area covered by Buxton MR. The Macclesfield forest area contains all the same terrain features you would find in a high level Highland Glen. You don't have to be at 8000m to hurt yourself in a way that requires specialist skills to be evacuated. I just hope you don't end up in similar circumstances. Your comments on this thread are not helpful and are disingenuous to the people that give up their time and energy to help others.
ads.ukclimbing.com
aln - on 20 Nov 2013
In reply to fmck:
> (In reply to aln)
> stop acting lilies a venomous.

What does that mean fmck?
andyathome - on 21 Nov 2013
In reply to ByEek:
> (In reply to fmck) You don't have to be at 8000m to hurt yourself in a way that requires specialist skills to be evacuated.

One would hope not.
fmck - on 30 Nov 2013
In reply to andyathome:
Guy at work stapled his hand with a staple last august it even drew blood. Site emergency team attended the scene and administered a sticky plaster. It was metres from the shoreline. What point are you making? That accidents happen below mountain level. No Shit!

Dear oh!
csw on 30 Nov 2013
In reply to fmck:

I agree, names are important. I was winched off a hill in Scotland by the coastguard once. To my shame I forgot to check their provenance at the time, and I was mortified when I eventually found out. To add insult to injury the MRT had also been assembled, but the helicopter snatched me away from under their noses. I can only assume that one of the members had maybe pulled someone out of the sea at some point, precipitating a turf war. Something needs to be done about this.
Al Evans on 30 Nov 2013
In reply to fmck:

> Why do they call themselfves the mountain rescue team when there area covers a forest with highest elevation 475m. They don't have any mountains ! Kind of think its an important element for a mountain rescue team.

Ah well, it's all the peaks :-)
marsbar - on 30 Nov 2013
In reply to RockAngel:
Never mind the mountain rescue, where is the tw*t removal team?

Hope the fundraising goes well.
Post edited at 09:31
August West on 30 Nov 2013
So what's in a name?

If you are stuck in a car after a crash you don't call a car dismantler do you? No you call the fire brigade whether the car is on fire or not.

Despite the name, the Cave Rescue Organisation also do mountain rescue. The neighbouring team Upper Wharfdale Fell Rescue Association (UWFRA) also do cave rescues.

csw on 30 Nov 2013
In reply to Furthur:

> So what's in a name?

> If you are stuck in a car after a crash you don't call a car dismantler do you? No you call the fire brigade whether the car is on fire or not.

If the car's not burning then they should at least set it on fire a little bit before they start cutting - otherwise the whole affair is a travesty
wendys - on 01 Dec 2013
In reply to RockAngel:

i seriously cannot believe what i have just read. this used to be a decent forum doi.g stuff like talking about climbing and other such activities.

its lovely that the ukc team have given us some lovely new buttons but i cant help thinking their time would be better spent removing the twunts that post absolute drivel.

no one cares what they are called, we just care that they are there and will do whatever it takes to help.
csw on 01 Dec 2013
In reply to wendys:

Just in case you meant me - I wasn't being serious :)

How's your wrist doing btw?
wendys - on 01 Dec 2013
In reply to csw:

lol no! i reckon most people would be able to identify the culprit! the wrist is healing and im looking forward to getting back out in the hills!!


im grateful that my mishap happened with others around who could help me off the hill. im so glad i got off without inconveniencing mrt.

think its time to donate a little more, or maybe get more involved with them. i now see just how easy it is to find yourself in a position where you need them.
csw on 01 Dec 2013
In reply to wendys:

Yeah - Life's full of surprises :)
Welsh Kate - on 01 Dec 2013
In reply to wendys:

Having an accident and being helped by an MR team was my incentive to get more involved with them - I started off being a Dogsbody for SARDA and ended up joining an MRT. Both are incredibly rewarding, and there's all sorts of ways to support Mountain Rescue depending on how much time you have and how active (or inactive) you want to be!
999thAndy on 01 Dec 2013
In reply to fmck:

> Why do they call themselfves the mountain rescue team when there area covers a forest with highest elevation 475m. They don't have any mountains ! Kind of think its an important element for a mountain rescue team.

You're *so* *right* - Englandshire doesn't have any mountains at all, nor any worthwhile climbing or remote areas where breaking an ankle would be anything more than a mild inconvenience. As soon as you are appointed supreme ruler of England you can make it your top priority to ensure that lowland rescue teams have the correct appellation.

Until then you can keep trying out for the all Scotland trolling team.

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