/ I can't run

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Oliiver - on 10 Nov 2013
This is a serious question. I can't physically run for more than a mile and it's not because I'm overweight; I just can't physically do it. How do I improve on this?
hokkyokusei - on 10 Nov 2013
In reply to Oliiver:

Man up?
JamButty - on 10 Nov 2013
In reply to Oliiver: couch to 5K plans - build up your distance by walk/run sets. It works!
Oliiver - on 10 Nov 2013
In reply to JamButty: you mean walk 100m, sprint 100m?
benlatham07 - on 10 Nov 2013
In reply to Oliiver: not sprint just run. Your not trying to sprint a mile are you?
JamButty - on 10 Nov 2013
In reply to Oliiver: google it and follow a plan. Its normally run 2 mins (any pace!), then walk 3 mins and repeat for x mins. Trick is to force yourself to walk. Its better than running until you can't run anymore which sounds like what you're doing.
Oliiver - on 10 Nov 2013
In reply to Oliiver: what's defined as a "sprint"?
Run_Ross_Run - on 10 Nov 2013
In reply to Oliiver:
Top tip.
Don't stop. Even if it hurts. Slow down (fast walk). Just dont stop.
Moley on 10 Nov 2013
In reply to Oliiver:
How far and fast can you walk?

Start by walking to warm up, say 20 mins, then alternate walk and jog. Go as your body feels (don't set specific times), if it's a long gentle downhill then jog 5 or 10 minutes, walk very hard up a hill etc. It will soon come. You may well not be warming up properly, so finding the run difficult, the older I get the longer it takes me to get into running mode.

Enter some LDWA events, no pressure 25 mile hard walks and add the jogs as you feel on the event.
robert-hutton on 10 Nov 2013
In reply to Oliiver:
If you a bit overweight I wouldn't run as you will damage you joints, go for a fast walk add a bit more distance each week and increase the speed as your weight drops, don't eat more in fact try to eat less.
Rob
nufkin - on 10 Nov 2013
In reply to Oliiver:

> what's defined as a "sprint"?

Running like you're being chased by a grizzly bear
Steff - on 10 Nov 2013
In reply to Oliiver:

> This is a serious question. I can't physically run for more than a mile and it's not because I'm overweight; I just can't physically do it. How do I improve on this?

Run slower. This is a serious answers, most new runners start too fast. Otherwise, if there is something seriously wring with you, see a doctor.
SI - profile removed on 10 Nov 2013
In reply to Oliiver: Persevere my friend!

I love running, been doing it since I was a child, six miles has been about an average run since I was 15. The crowning moments of my hobby was Scafell Pike and Helvellyn.

Had two intense periods of depression in my life, both times I just lost the ability to run despite nothing changing physically. My years in the army taught me endurance is as much in the mind as the body.

I stuck at it, I 'knew' running was the only thing that could drag me out of the hell hole I was in. If I got 200 yards further than the last attempt it was a sucess. I was clinically depressed for six months, left my bed for 7-8 hours a day. Within three months of deciding to sort my life out I could run 12 mile at 7 minute miles, fit, happy and employed.

Ride bikes these days but the runner in me still burns. I'm just saving my knees for the Bob Graham round.
Neil Williams - on 10 Nov 2013
In reply to Oliiver:

The kind of running that knackers you out over a short distance?

Neil
Oliiver - on 10 Nov 2013
In reply to Oliiver: thanks for the advice guys. I'm going to embark on my maiden voyage and endeavour to run round the fields where a live, without stopping. With the aim, of gradually increasing in the ratio of walking:running.
Chris the Tall - on 10 Nov 2013
In reply to Oliiver:
My wife is 49, and had never done any running until she agreed to do the 5k run for life in June. She got an iPhone app called 5k runner and followed it religiously. In the beginning she was running for a minute, walking for 5 etc. after 8 weeks she could run 5k. She's now run two 10Ks.
Oliiver - on 10 Nov 2013
In reply to Chris the Tall: Well done to her tbh, especially at the age of 49.
Orgsm on 10 Nov 2013
In reply to Oliiver:

Honestly 10k at 49 is no big deal. I have a friend , at 56, running sub 3 hour marathons. It's all about where your coming from.
Chris the Tall - on 10 Nov 2013
In reply to Beat me to it!:
> (In reply to Oliiver)
>
> Honestly 10k at 49 is no big deal. I have a friend , at 56, running sub 3 hour marathons. It's all about where your coming from.

She wishes to add that she's asthmatic, oh and that you can f*** **** :)

But as you say, it's where you come from, and she's proof that you can start from zero.

A female friend of a friend recently did her first ironman triathlon at the age of 56
anaesthetic on 10 Nov 2013
In reply to Oliiver:

I'd also suggest the couch to 5k program, worked for my OH (who's just done his first 10k fell race) and its working for me too.

http://www.coolrunning.com/engine/2/2_3/181.shtml
ice.solo - on 12 Nov 2013
In reply to Oliiver:

CANT run or DONT run?

Unless youre damaged in some way you can run 10km if you try. It simply takes time and the presence of mind to do it. It wont happen otherwise.
lost1977 - on 12 Nov 2013
In reply to Oliiver:

i never used to be able to run and then when i tried it again as an adult something clicked and i worked out what i had been doing wrong. secret i found was learning how to pace yourself and control your heart rate, as soon as you lose control and your heart rate starts to rise too quickly you feel like your going to die (difficult to get it back once you start to lose it)
Oliiver - on 12 Nov 2013
In reply to Oliiver: It's more the case of i'm not a runner. I'm reasonably fit, i can walk 5-6km all day up and down mountainous terrain
Ander on 13 Nov 2013
In reply to Oliiver:

It's fairly simple. Run slower, even ridiculously slowly. Keep doing that 4 or 5 times a week, and you'll get further each week, and indeed get quicker over time.
Ander on 13 Nov 2013
In reply to Oliiver:
> (In reply to Oliiver) It's more the case of i'm not a runner. I'm reasonably fit, i can walk 5-6km all day up and down mountainous terrain.

5-6km walking is not really a testing distance. I'd suggest that if you consider that 'reasonably fit', then you're not. "When I were a lad" covering twice that distance each day for a week wasn't really challenging.

However, the good news is that anyone can become 'reasonably fit'. Simply by doing a little bit of gentle exercise everyday.

And once you're reasonably fit, should then want to become 'super fit' there's no reason you couldn't do that either.

winhill - on 13 Nov 2013
In reply to Oliiver:

The problem could be posture, it sounds like you're leaning too far to the right.
The New NickB - on 13 Nov 2013
In reply to Ander:

I think he means 4-6km per hour.
IainRUK - on 13 Nov 2013
In reply to The New NickB: which is probably rubbish.. if you can walk 4km/ hour including terrain, ascents and descents you are fit. Its not that far off Bob graham pace. 6 km is certainly Bob Graham pace. Most people hugely over estimate their walking pace.

Oliiver.. I've seen this before.. quite typical really in people who have never had to fight. A lack of spine and guts, sorry to be blunt but a 16 year old should get fit in a few weeks. Did you play ball sports? Many who don't never learnt to hurt, that mental force to keep going. Your Dad's successful, he must be competitive, you must have that in you. I had an old teacher who used to called it 'middle class hardness' (25 years ago).. and it's basically that drive to get to the next level. Such a term probably doesn't exist anymore, I think the old class system has gone, but I think you see it in many young professionals who are successful in their work life are also successful in work because they have that fight inside them.

I was out for a run this morning 7:30 am with a great runner and we did 20 k averaging 6:12 minute mile (15-16kph) over sandy trails. He was well happy at the end because he had a hard session but knew how much I was hurting keeping with him and appreciated it. He was saying how so few runners now how to hurt or are willing to.

You have to be consistent.. not 3 weeks on.. 5 weeks off.. 6 weeks on.. 4 weeks off.. 4-5 times every week.. rain, snow, work, exams, darkness.

The guy I run with is fairly much full time, gets paid appearance fees to race, 65 min half marathoner, and looking at the Olympics for Lesotho. He's much much better than me but we train together, race together and meet at stupid times in the morning for hard sessions, and he posted this on his Athlete profile on Facebook.. I'm not bragging, its just people think it's all down to 'can't run'.. 'genetics'.. 'luck'.. no.. its going out and doing hard 10-20 mile runs after work. Its going that extra yard when others don't. But this comment meant a lot to me because he could see I was tired, I didn't want to go out, but I want to run well in 2 weeks so needed to put the session in. You have to build up slowly, but running quick doesn't come easily to most of us.
"Iain - I want to say this to you my man. I REALLY admire your commitment & desire to run WOW. I looked at you today when you came from work at 19:57:35 Hrs at the gym. You told me you are going to run 32km outside & you had your night head lamp. I said to myself this guy is SUPER serious, he is focused on his goal, he doesn't let anything distracts him & he will run whether it rains, snows or windy. I admit I have learnt a lot from you mate - keep it up & help me too as you always do. Thanx mate"

I don't think I'm a top runner, but I've had relative success because I know, from football/rugby, what it is to hurt, and what consistency means. We're both young, have free time, no kids. The only thing stopping us getting fitter is us.
franksnb - on 13 Nov 2013
In reply to Oliiver: both ends of the spectrum in this thread!

my advice take small steps, keep looking up and go slow.
Darren Jackson - on 13 Nov 2013
In reply to JamButty:
>
> couch to 5K plans - build up your distance by walk/run sets. It works!

I second this advice.

I was in a similar position, of not being able to run more than 5 yards without collapsing. I downloaded the following Guardian podcasts. They're very good and well-paced. I am now regularly running 5km without too much trouble at all. If you're serious about wanting to run, then I can't recommend the podcasts enough:

https://itunes.apple.com/gb/podcast/guardian-guide-to-running/id675599478
outtathaway - on 13 Nov 2013
In reply to Oliiver: The fact is that running is really tough, far tougher than just going for a bike ride or a few lengths of your local pool. I recently decided to take it up, naively believing that I would be able to run for about 45 minutes straight away. I only managed 20 minutes. The advice I would give you is to run slowly, about the pace that you could maintain a conversation at. Also the first 5-10 minutes of the run are the toughest, I think that's when you're warming up and it gets easier past that stage. At first try running slowly for 15-20 minutes, then walk afterwards for another 15-20 minutes. Do that on alternative days, soon enough you'll be making gains, it won't feel as hard and you'll be able to go further and further.
IainRUK - on 13 Nov 2013
In reply to franksnb: certainly go slow.. as I say.. walk/run combo's if needs be.. but 16 year olds should make huge strides in weeks. You gain fitness so quickly at that age.

But I do think it will help if he was a ball player, because he will know how to run.. you see some people take up running, especially females, and they basically gave up any activity at age 14.. and have lost the coordination to run, you see it in some males too.
It's why I'd advise a few 100m sprints. It's said the 30 second burst is one of the key training distances for most running distances so it will provide benefit, but it just teaches your body running.
Nick Russell on 13 Nov 2013
In reply to jamesgreenfield:
> The fact is that running is... far tougher than just going for a bike ride or a few lengths of your local pool.

I'd dispute this... as a competitive swimmer for many years, I know it can be as tough as you make it. Same goes for cycling, if you talk to a club cyclist. The running equivalent of a "bike ride" or a "few length of your local pool", is "going for a short jog", and it won't be any harder than the former two.

Back on topic though, I second what Iain says about mental strength. You've got to know how to train hard. Staying in your comfort zone, you might make slow gains over time, but if you want any rapid improvement you have to step outside that. (Usual disclaimer: but not to the point of injury)
The New NickB - on 13 Nov 2013
In reply to jamesgreenfield:

Running is easy, it is just a case of putting one foot in front of the other, what is hard is judging the pace you need to go at to run a set distance or time. Anyone who is moderately fit with normally functions legs can run for an hour, blowing up after 20 minutes probably just means starting too fast.
IainRUK - on 13 Nov 2013
In reply to The New NickB: I know but some think they are tired when they are just getting going. There's blow up and there's just working hard. Its like separating tiredness aches and injury pains.. its take time to know when its good and not good.

I do think running is easy in that its non-technical really.. well should be for most. My mates a competitive swimmer and I thought I was OK.. and he says my swimming technique is so bad its like trying to run a race hopping...
The New NickB - on 13 Nov 2013
In reply to IainRUK:
> (In reply to The New NickB) I know but some think they are tired when they are just getting going. There's blow up and there's just working hard. Its like separating tiredness aches and injury pains.. its take time to know when its good and not good.

Without a doubt, people think hurting from working hard is bad, you can't race or do hard training without a fair bit of hurt.
>
> I do think running is easy in that its non-technical really.. well should be for most. My mates a competitive swimmer and I thought I was OK.. and he says my swimming technique is so bad its like trying to run a race hopping...

I think technique, or rather form can make a big difference in running, but that just comes with miles, swimming is much, much more reliant on technique.
Neil Williams - on 13 Nov 2013
In reply to The New NickB:

"Without a doubt, people think hurting from working hard is bad, you can't race or do hard training without a fair bit of hurt."

That depends what the OP wants to do. If he wants to be able to run (rather than compete), say to do a 5k in half an hour or something similarly untaxing, he won't need *that* much hurt.

Neil
Tall Clare - on 13 Nov 2013
This thread is relevant to my interests, as an unfit tubber with a lot of half-hearted attempts to C25K run behind her... It seems the answer is discipline, not getting distracted, not finding rubbish excuses as to why you 'can't', personning-the-f*ck-up and getting on with it... Oh, and the revelation that 'conversation-speed' can feel like running in slow motion but it means you're still running/jogging/making forward progress a while later...

Perhaps I should take some of my own advice ;-)
jpicksley - on 13 Nov 2013
In reply to IainRUK: Wise words again from Iain.

Oliiver - running is easy but it hurts, especially when you start out. It puts a lot of stress on the body and makes muscles ache. You need to take time for your body to adjust to it. While you're starting out run slower and keep going. If you must stop running keep walking fast. Try not to stop completely - it won't help, physically or mentally. And if you can keep off road, then do so. Road running is very hard on the body. Make sure you take a regular recovery day but keep consistency in your running over a good period of time like Iain says. If you're relatively hill fit (and it sounds like you think you are) you'll improve quickly. Put the effort in and you can do whatever you want.

Running is brilliant so I hope you get in to it and enjoy it. Good luck.
IainRUK - on 13 Nov 2013
In reply to Neil Williams:
> (In reply to The New NickB)
>
> "Without a doubt, people think hurting from working hard is bad, you can't race or do hard training without a fair bit of hurt."
>
> That depends what the OP wants to do. If he wants to be able to run (rather than compete), say to do a 5k in half an hour or something similarly untaxing, he won't need *that* much hurt.
>
> Neil

Not to jog, but initially it won't be easy. 2 weeks - 1 month and it will be much much easier.
ice.solo - on 13 Nov 2013
In reply to Tall Clare:

> personning-the-f*ck-up

best thing ive heard in a while.
Tall Clare - on 13 Nov 2013
In reply to ice.solo:

Well - man-the-f*ck-up implies that being tough/determined/etc is a male trait to aspire to. The determined tough nuts with ultra-distance stamina and feistiness in my world tend to be female.
MG - on 13 Nov 2013
In reply to IainRUK: You make it sound like torture! He wants to run a bit more than a mile, not a marathon at record speed!

The answer is go and run a bit further a bit slower than normal. Then repeat two or three days later. Find somewhere you enjoy running so it is a pleasure not a chore. Pick nice weather not driving rain etc.
IainRUK - on 13 Nov 2013
In reply to Tall Clare: Well its unlady like to be tough or strong... :-)

Good point.. person-the-f**k-up works well..

I'm friends with an olympic marathoner, 3 kids, before she ran in 2 olympics.. and she reckoned that was key.. because it taught her about discipline, hurt, and also balancing time. So training time was valuable and to be used.
IainRUK - on 13 Nov 2013
In reply to MG:
> (In reply to IainRUK) You make it sound like torture! He wants to run a bit more than a mile, not a marathon at record speed!
>
> The answer is go and run a bit further a bit slower than normal. Then repeat two or three days later. Find somewhere you enjoy running so it is a pleasure not a chore. Pick nice weather not driving rain etc.

No i don't.. to be quick it is. To just run not at all once you have got started, but running isn't easy early on. Its why many people give up. If it is so easy why do we have so many couch-5k plans, runners world is huge.

I think you can learn to love bad weather. There's a pleasure to knowing you are out when others aren't. Christmas day for example.

MG - on 13 Nov 2013
In reply to IainRUK:
> (In reply to MG)
> [...]
>
> No i don't.. to be quick it is. To just run not at all once you have got started, but running isn't easy early on. Its why many people give up.

Generally people will stop things they aren't enjoying. Make running enjoyable not something that "hurts", initally at least, I would say.

>
> I think you can learn to love bad weather. There's a pleasure to knowing you are out when others aren't. Christmas day for example.

Yes but I think "learn" is the key word.

The New NickB - on 13 Nov 2013
In reply to Neil Williams:
> (In reply to The New NickB)
>
> "Without a doubt, people think hurting from working hard is bad, you can't race or do hard training without a fair bit of hurt."
>
> That depends what the OP wants to do. If he wants to be able to run (rather than compete), say to do a 5k in half an hour or something similarly untaxing, he won't need *that* much hurt.
>
> Neil

The point is people stop when it starts to get a little hard, surely people want to run to improve fitness, it requires a little effort.
The New NickB - on 13 Nov 2013
In reply to Neil Williams:
> (In reply to The New NickB)
>
> "Without a doubt, people think hurting from working hard is bad, you can't race or do hard training without a fair bit of hurt."
>
> That depends what the OP wants to do. If he wants to be able to run (rather than compete), say to do a 5k in half an hour or something similarly untaxing, he won't need *that* much hurt.
>
> Neil

Main point is that hurting isn't bad. People can run in an undemanding way if they want, but it is best to have a level of fitness to be able to enjoy that.
IainRUK - on 13 Nov 2013
In reply to The New NickB: exactly.. you improve through stress.. do weights.. breakdown the muscle.. rebuilds stronger.. if you want to improve their has to be some stress. But you cant improve your CV until your legs are strong enough to work your CV.

Early on people have imbalances. Swimmers and climbers maybe, better CV systems than running leg strength, or vice versa for others.. so it will hurt a bit whilst one side catches up.
The New NickB - on 13 Nov 2013
In reply to Neil Williams:
> (In reply to The New NickB)
>
> That depends what the OP wants to do. If he wants to be able to run (rather than compete), say to do a 5k in half an hour or something similarly untaxing, he won't need *that* much hurt.
>
A sub 30 minute 5k is a major achievement for a lot of people so don't belittle that, but if it is t a big achievement, people should set another goal.

Tall Clare - on 13 Nov 2013
In reply to The New NickB:

This. There's a lot to be said for setting your own goals rather than being distracted by others. My best friend is an ultra runner, my husband thinks a comfortably sub-40 min 10k is a normal lollopy training run, an ex was a sub 2h45 (i.e. respectable) marathoner - despite all those people around, a 30min 5k would feel heroic for me.
Darren Jackson - on 13 Nov 2013
In reply to Tall Clare:
>
> ... despite all those people around, a 30min 5k would feel heroic for me.

Clare, I know that you've mentioned that you've tried such things previously, but take a look at the Guardian podcasts that I linked to earlier in the thread. I reckon that you'd be feeling heroic within 8 weeks.

hokkyokusei - on 13 Nov 2013
In reply to Neil Williams:
>
> That depends what the OP wants to do. If he wants to be able to run (rather than compete), say to do a 5k in half an hour or something similarly untaxing, he won't need *that* much hurt.

5km in 30 mins! He's 16!

Earlier in the summer, at work, we created a "whiteboard league" for a 5km route down the canal tow path. A dozen blokes of various ages from 30-something to 50-something went out at various times and ran the same 5km course, ALL of them did better than 30 mins after no more than three goes. ALL of them. Some of them had never run before and weren't particularly fit.

Unless he's got some kind of physical disability then I would say he's just soft.


JamButty - on 13 Nov 2013
In reply to MG:
> (In reply to IainRUK) You make it sound like torture! He wants to run a bit more than a mile, not a marathon at record speed!
>
> The answer is go and run a bit further a bit slower than normal. Then repeat two or three days later. Find somewhere you enjoy running so it is a pleasure not a chore. Pick nice weather not driving rain etc.

+1, this threads suddenly got really heavy and I wouldn't be suprised if we've scared poor Oliiver off.

Do it for enjoyment and basic fitness. If you want to take it further fine and good luck. Each one to their own. I used to hate running, now love it, wish I'd started younger, hate it now I haven't run for 6 weeks due to injury, but I'll never (or really want to) win anything.
Oliiver - on 13 Nov 2013
In reply to Oliiver: I don't think you i could accept a female's advice. After all, men are faster than women. I'm not "Soft", i generally can't run, i can walk 25miles up and down all day, but i can't run 5km - neither can any of my family.
Tall Clare - on 13 Nov 2013
In reply to Oliiver:
> (In reply to Oliiver) I don't think you i could accept a female's advice.

Oliiver, have you considered that what's slowing you down is the weight of your own misguided opinions?

> After all, men are faster than women. I'm not "Soft", i generally can't run, i can walk 25miles up and down all day, but i can't run 5km - neither can any of my family.

If you can walk that far, you can run. You're just being feeble.

John Gillott - on 13 Nov 2013
In reply to Oliiver:

Can you do a very very slow jog, so slow that you could almost walk as fast? Have you tried doing that for 5k? Or is there a specific mechanical problem that stops you running?
Darren Jackson - on 13 Nov 2013
In reply to Oliiver:
>
> I don't think you i could accept a female's advice. After all, men are faster than women.

Well done. I reckon that ought to pretty much kill your thread.

Google Helene Diamantides, or somebody similar, if you want to reinforce your notion of just how 'useless' women runners are.
Oliiver - on 13 Nov 2013
In reply to Darren Jackson: Hey, men are faster than women. What's wrong with that?
Tall Clare - on 13 Nov 2013
In reply to Oliiver:

That statement might be true in a broader sense but we're talking about *you* here, not Usain Bolt or Mo Farah. Sounds like at the moment you're slower than all female runners, because you don't run. As the saying goes, even the slowest runner is lapping the person on the couch.
Wonrek - on 13 Nov 2013
In reply to Oliiver: I can run a 100 miles nonstop....but hey, I'm just a girly and not worth listening to.....






Sheesh!!!!
Nick Russell on 13 Nov 2013
In reply to Oliiver:
> (In reply to Oliiver) I don't think you i could accept a female's advice. After all, men are faster than women.

Wow, that's got to be one of the longest set-ups for a troll I've seen on this forum. Most people make the mistake of going in for their punchline too early, you played the long game and got a few people genuinely interested in answering your question first.
MG - on 13 Nov 2013
In reply to Oliiver:
> (In reply to Oliiver) I don't think you i could accept a female's advice. After all, men are faster than women.

You know how atheletes tend to be faster than their coaches...
IainRUK - on 13 Nov 2013
In reply to Oliiver:
> (In reply to Darren Jackson) Hey, men are faster than women. What's wrong with that?

no, the fastest men tend to be faster than than the fastest women but as most of both will apparently be quicker than you I'd listen to anyone.

Paula Radcliffe was the fastest marathoner, M & F, in the UK for a few years.
JamButty - on 13 Nov 2013
In reply to Oliiver:
> (In reply to Oliiver) I don't think you i could accept a female's advice.

Brilliant - well done for raising the interest level on this thread....

<sits back to enjoy.....>

Oliiver - on 13 Nov 2013
In reply to Oliiver: No, i was seriously interested in becoming a runner. I mean Clare, i probably am "feeble" when running. When i participate in more manly activities i.e. chopping firewood, i'm not feeble then.
IainRUK - on 13 Nov 2013
In reply to Oliiver: Then just run more.. do it for a month and see how it is.. too many think a 5k every sunday will somehow get them fit..
MG - on 13 Nov 2013
In reply to Oliiver:
When i participate in more manly activities i.e. chopping firewood,

Shouldn't someone of your age be doing more serious things than that - bear wrestling and so on? Are you some sort of effette, towny right-winger? Possibly gay?
Oliiver - on 13 Nov 2013
In reply to Oliiver: There's not many bears in Cheshire. I'm like Bear Grylls, without the Grylls bit yet.
John Lewis - on 13 Nov 2013
In reply to Oliiver: Yep me 4 years ago! could manage 200m. Now entered a marathon and training for it.

Set targets 1k 5k 10k dont worry about how long you take to get there, just confirm you can get there

Watch the weight fall off.

See my threads and appreciate the help from people on here

http://www.ukclimbing.com/forums/t.php?t=427743&v=1#x6094365
http://www.ukclimbing.com/forums/t.php?t=381682&v=1#x5901305

I should say something said to me......


Get your sh1t together, move more eat less, be hard on yourself!

& Good luck, it really is worth all the effort, 6 months to a new man
Oliiver - on 13 Nov 2013
In reply to Oliiver: I've heard running knackers the knees. Is this true?
John Lewis - on 13 Nov 2013
In reply to Oliiver:
> (In reply to Darren Jackson) Hey, men are faster than women. What's wrong with that?

I run occasionally with a great woman who is faster and more determined than me, and who got me running in the first place and listened to my inane yabbering on the subject incessently until one day I beat my own expectations by miles.

Until you can out run all women, I wouldn't even mention the issue.

Just learn to run for yourself!
John Lewis - on 13 Nov 2013
In reply to Oliiver:
> (In reply to Oliiver) I've heard running knackers the knees. Is this true?

Possibly but if you really are 16 shouldnt be an issue I'm 46 and still 14 stone and mine are fine! get good running shoes.

And stop looking for excuses!

IainRUK - on 13 Nov 2013
In reply to Oliiver:
> (In reply to Oliiver) I've heard running knackers the knees. Is this true?

its arguable.. some say yes, some say it promotes blood flow so you get stronger knees..

TBH I run 4000 miles a year, I've met so many amazing people, great friends, I've ran under the eiger in the jungfrau, completed some great ultra's, ran for my country, won races, seen amazing sights through running..

Even if it did mean I'm shortening my active life I wouldn't care. Its the life in the years, not years in the life and all that.
Oliiver - on 13 Nov 2013
In reply to Oliiver: Once this breeze passes over i'm going to head of running
John Lewis - on 13 Nov 2013
In reply to Oliiver:
> (In reply to Oliiver) Once this breeze passes over i'm going to head of running

Don't be a wuss, go now run slow!
outtathaway - on 13 Nov 2013
In reply to the new Nick B Nick Russell:

Fair enough, my post wasn't the most well thought out. I was just going by my experience which was that I went for an hour's bike ride and didn't find that too bad, but then 20 minutes running was really difficult. But you're right, whatever activity, it's as hard as you make it. On the run I went on I went on I went really slow, guess I'm just unfit at the moment.
Neil Williams - on 13 Nov 2013
In reply to The New NickB:

Not belittling it at all (indeed my 5K time is slightly longer than that - but then I'm not much of a runner and am not really trying to be one). But a fit 16 year old should be able to manage it easily enough with a bit of training, rather than a slightly lardy and heavily built 34 year old with knackered knees (due to a cycling accident, not due to running - indeed, I find running and climbing both loosen them up a bit).

Neil
outtathaway - on 13 Nov 2013
In reply to Oliiver: I think you need to lose the sexist attitude, a lot of women on this thread have offered you sound advice. Also, as other people have said there are a lot of very good women runners. Also, try the c25k running programme as other people have suggested.
Neil Williams - on 13 Nov 2013
In reply to jamesgreenfield:

I find cycling is a lot less effort, I suspect this is because you always get a chance to rest a bit going downhill rather than effort being much more continuous as with running.

Of course as you say you could cycle flat-out the whole time, but in practice people don't unless racing.

Neil
nufkin - on 13 Nov 2013
In reply to Neil Williams:

> I find cycling is a lot less effort

That's because it is, surely. Plus you're sitting down for most of it
Boogie - on 14 Nov 2013
In reply to Oliiver:

What you mean by "can't physically run" is the point here. Is it because you run out of energy, get too out of breath or is it pain from joints that stop you? If it's joint pain, then you need to start addressing things like your footwear, running style and looking at dropping weight. If it's fatigue, breathing, stitch, then you've just got to keep going out running until it improves really, maybe cross training with swimming/cycling. Saying 'man up' isn't a blasť or snide comment, you simply have to endure and keep at it to improve, though don't injure yourself in the process. We all "can't physically run for more than X" miles, and and X has changed in both directions with training (physical, psychological and style), injury, diet, recovery and ageing. Just 'get into running' and you'll figure it out.

bx

bx
JayPee630 - on 14 Nov 2013
In reply to Oliiver:

You really are a comically stupid person with your sexist views! The only slack I'll cut you is that you're probably a very young posh boy.
Duncan Bourne - on 15 Nov 2013
In reply to Oliiver:
What is happening when you try to run further? Is it being out of breath, physical pain or something else? What you get will affect how you can improve. General knackeredness will probably mean it just being a question of practice and gradual increase. Pain or other symptoms may be down to how you run or other health issues.
Tall Clare - on 17 Nov 2013
In reply to Oliiver:

How's the running going Oliiver? Have you got started on a plan yet?

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