/ Approach shoe advice

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alooker - on 13 Nov 2013
Looking to replace my scarpa crux shoes that are rather worse for wear. I found them good to climb with and had no issues with long approaches etc. I'm looking for something new as they're heavy and bulky.

I'm looking for:
Lightweight
Non bulky (to hang on my harness or in a bag)
Grippy for loose descents, easy climbs and general roaming!

Some water resistance would be good, but not a priority.

I also do some trail running, would consider something that doesn't compromise too heavily.

Anything out there or am I trying to fit too many apples in the bag?
Mountain Llama on 13 Nov 2013
In reply to alooker: I just use my off-road runners. There not gortex or the like but good grip and v lite. Just check they have heel loops to attach 2 harness with krab.

Currently on addidas kanadia, sub 40 pounds, see wiggle web site. They are v small fitting so best to try b 4 u buy.

Cheers Davey
flaneur - on 13 Nov 2013
In reply to alooker:

> I'm looking for:
> Lightweight
> Non bulky (to hang on my harness or in a bag)
> Grippy for loose descents, easy climbs and general roaming!

Approach shoes work well in the terrain they are designed for: dry, rocky scrambles like the Dolomites or California. They are quite inappropriate for most UK climbers as they are lethal for slithering across fells or down steep grassy descents to sea-cliffs.

You want fell running shoes: Walsh, Innov8, the usual suspects according to your foot shape.

ow arm - on 13 Nov 2013
In reply to alooker: id suggest the Inov-8 trail range something like the roclite 295.
Ive just worn down a pair of mudroc 290 (sadly no longer in production) which I have used for day hikes, trail and fell running, and for walking in snow they grip better than my normal hiking boots. Aside from getting wet feet if I wore them all the time then Id have no use for hiking boots most of the time.
alooker - on 13 Nov 2013
In reply to flaneur: thanks everyone I'll have a look at those and try on a few. They weren't necessarily just for the uk, in the last year the scarpas have served me well on three continents.
MFB - on 14 Nov 2013
In reply to owena:

Inov8 mudrocks had a brilliant sole, stick to anything, without doubt the best sole for wet rock,grass, greasy ghylls that i have come across

But the uppers - 4 pairs of various inov8, never had an upper last more than a few weeks or hold my foot properly

could this just be my feet? I'm avoiding
Jonny2vests - on 14 Nov 2013
In reply to alooker:

If you're serious about climbing in them, then 5.10s rule. Insight, Ascents, Camp 4s, Tennies, I've had the lot. Regularly lead up to E1 in them, no bother. Great for alpine routes, no need to pack something else for the descent.
mkean - on 14 Nov 2013
In reply to Jonny2vests:
Tennies are only very slightly better than rock shoes for your typical UK terrain though as the sole is awful on wet grass :-)

I picked up a pair of Salomon X-overs in Chamonix earlier this year and have been pretty impressed, they have handled snow, mud and grass pretty well yet also climb fairly well.
Jonny2vests - on 14 Nov 2013
In reply to mkean:

Tennies are better than rock shoes?
Jonny2vests - on 14 Nov 2013
In reply to Jonny2vests:

Oh I see, you mean for walking around in. Yeah, I prefer Insights / Camp 4s for that kind of thing.
matejn - on 14 Nov 2013
In reply to alooker: Dolomite steinbock approach gtx. I m not sure about trail running thing but everything else should be spot on.
SuperstarDJ - on 15 Nov 2013
In reply to Jonny2vests:
> (In reply to alooker)
>
> If you're serious about climbing in them, then 5.10s rule. Insight, Ascents, Camp 4s, Tennies, I've had the lot. Regularly lead up to E1 in them, no bother. Great for alpine routes, no need to pack something else for the descent.

A vote for Camp 4's from me. Great to walk in and with a rugged enough sole for wet conditions (I've worn them in deep snow with gaiters and waterproof socks too).
CurlyStevo - on 15 Nov 2013
In reply to SuperstarDJ: the camp fours are fairly good but I wouldnt get them again as they are so wide at the front a narrower pair would climb better (I have wide feet). the other cons are they are pretty heavy and even after applying dubin not water proof, slow to dry and the sole wears our quickly. on the plus side they are comfy and good for walking in but unless on rock especially wet rock a light weight walking trainer would be better.
Jonny2vests - on 15 Nov 2013
In reply to CurlyStevo:
> (In reply to SuperstarDJ) the camp fours are fairly good but I wouldnt get them again as they are so wide at the front a narrower pair would climb better (I have wide feet). the other cons are they are pretty heavy and even after applying dubin not water proof, slow to dry and the sole wears our quickly. on the plus side they are comfy and good for walking in but unless on rock especially wet rock a light weight walking trainer would be better.

Edging in them will always be a disaster, so width for me doesn't matter too much.
Kirill - on 15 Nov 2013
In reply to alooker:

Perhaps not what you want to hear, but unfortunately you won't be able to replace Scarpa Crux with anything better, as they are the best approach shoes there are. Just accept it and get another pair. Out of interest how long your old pair lasted?
alooker - on 15 Nov 2013
In reply to Kirill: they lasted 12 months
steely85 - on 15 Nov 2013
In reply to alooker:
Boreal flyer, a massively underated shoe for UK conditions in my humble opinion.
Kirill - on 18 Nov 2013
In reply to alooker:

That's disappointing. I'll take my words back then. I hope mine will last longer. I've had them since July, so far in one piece.
Tom Last - on 18 Nov 2013
In reply to steely85:
> (In reply to alooker)
> Boreal flyer, a massively underated shoe for UK conditions in my humble opinion.

I had some of them and they were brilliant, far better than Boulder-Xs, can you still get Flyers though?

I'd go for some fell shoes though.
steely85 - on 18 Nov 2013
In reply to Tom Last:

Great shoes, although they have gone up in price in recent years but what hasn't...

Pretty sure the usual v12 and rock and run etc still stock them.
ads.ukclimbing.com
Nath93 - on 18 Nov 2013
In reply to alooker: Got a pair of Tennies and can't say they've held me back in terms of loose slopes and found them surprisingly grippy on wet grass. Also really good on damp rock. But if you are wanting something more all round then looking into a decent pair of trail shoes might not be a bad idea.
James91 - on 18 Nov 2013
In reply to alooker: La Sportiva Xplorers - amazing. Climb incredibly well and after spending this weekend scrambling in snowdonia in the rain and running around on steep wet grass the sole appears to fare incredibly well on loose stuff too! Very highly advised.
inboard - on 19 Nov 2013
In reply to alooker:
I've had a few pairs of 5.10s, tennies, and also camp four. found them OK in UK, prone to slipping on steep mud & wet grass.

more recently I've moved to Millet Tridents - amazing. they're lighter, yet have a good vibram sole, so are far better on snow & mud & grass. wouldn't hesitate to recommend them and will definitely be replacing them with the same when they die.
More-On - on 19 Nov 2013
In reply to inboard: A good spot! The Tridents do look rather fine - good sole and no membrane. How stiff is the midsole i.e. do they climb OK? Can I also ask what the fit is like? Are they wide or narrow, high or low volume?
Cheers
Louis Miller - on 19 Nov 2013
In reply to alooker:

I love my tennie Camp Fours, will handle anything solid like a dream, as mentioned though hilariously bad on wet grass/roots
Stairclimber - on 21 Nov 2013
I saw some Karimor shoes in an 8 for a bargain 25 in JD Sports in Brighton on 21/11/13. Worth looking into if the size fits.

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