/ Edelrid 6 point crampons

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jazzyjackson on 25 Nov 2013
Anyone used these things?

My partner is getting into the odd winter munro and fancies these as a cheap way in.

I think they look fine combined with an axe on icey sections! Just a bit concerned at lack of front points so steep ascent sections would need to be climbed sideways.

JJ
andy_e on 25 Nov 2013
In reply to jazzyjackson:

No problem with tackling slopes sideways. If the slope is getting steep enough to need to front point then perhaps the whole situation needs to be reconsidered. If you are going to stick solely to easy winter walking they should be fine. However if you have a decent set of boots, then perhaps look at finding a c1 or c2 crampon such as the grivel monta rosa or g12 respectively. They may be a little overkill for winter walking, but should allow you to progress into easy grade winter stuff if you feel like it in the future. In the long run, this might save you having to buy two sets of crampons.
jazzyjackson on 25 Nov 2013
In reply to talon_guy:

Thanks and fair point. I can guarantee the candidate has NO aspirations for winter climbing! Their boots are a good quality flexible soled leather walking boot with a vibram sole.

Think I will go ahead with these and keep an eye on them when they're ascending slopes to ensure good side stepping technique.

To be honest I think the most extreme route they will see is stuff like the Tarmigan Ridge which we did at the weekend without crampons.

They are 24 and they look great for packing away compactly for the occasional situation.

: )

JJ

Jamie B - on 25 Nov 2013
In reply to jazzyjackson:

I wouldn't touch them. They are designed for walking on flat surfaces. Munros are not flat surfaces. I can't remember a winter walking day where I felt the need for crampons and didn't want/need to lean on the toe of my boot at some point. Without front points you can't do this.

They are better than nothing. But the thought of moving uphill on a hard runout slope with these fills me with horror. They place a huge limitation on the wearer, and if that wearer goes on to engage with bumpier terrain it will be a false economy, as they will simply not be up to the job.

There are better things to save money on than personal protective equipment!
jazzyjackson on 25 Nov 2013
In reply to Jamie B:

Thanks for that and good call! The lack of front points concerns me hence the post!

The more I think about it the more they sound dangerous. Imagine trying to walk uphill headon and having the whole toes slide backwards!

Think maybe some 10 pointers would be a better purchase,

JJ

Jamie B - on 25 Nov 2013
In reply to talon_guy:

> if you have a decent set of boots, then perhaps look at finding a c1 or c2 crampon such as the grivel monta rosa or g12 respectively. They may be a little overkill for winter walking...

It's not overkill to want to stick to things! Which is why any winter walking or skills course will demand C2 crampons as minimum.
ow arm - on 25 Nov 2013
In reply to jazzyjackson: I tend to agree 6 points is far too few for any proper walking

Camp MagiX come in an 8 or 10. My wife has the 10 and they are great, Ive seen the 10 point and they look fine too (if you dont need the front two points)

jazzyjackson on 25 Nov 2013
In reply to Jamie B:
> (In reply to talon_guy)
>
> [...]
>
> It's not overkill to want to stick to things! Which is why any winter walking or skills course will demand C2 crampons as minimum.

There is no overkill IMO but she has boots she likes and theres little chance of convincing her to upgrade to heavier stiffer boots for her aspirations.

Will see how she enjoys winter munro bagging this winter and take it from there!

Thanks

JJ
jazzyjackson on 25 Nov 2013
In reply to owena:
> (In reply to jazzyjackson) I tend to agree 6 points is far too few for any proper walking
>
> Camp MagiX come in an 8 or 10. My wife has the 10 and they are great, Ive seen the 10 point and they look fine too (if you dont need the front two points)

thanks, been looking at the 10 point ones with front points! : )
andy_e on 25 Nov 2013
In reply to Jamie B:

It depends on the terrain, I've happily climbed Scottish grade 3/4 in C2 crampons, and in that respect, they might be considered excessive if all you encounter is a gentle slope once in a while, as in actually walking. I agree completely with you that you might want something more than 6 point in-step crampon if your definition of winter walking includes some slopes!
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martinph78 on 25 Nov 2013
In reply to Jamie B:
> Which is why any winter walking or skills course will demand C2 crampons as minimum.

Not sure why a C2 is minimum. C1 is perfectly fine for winter walking.

Also they have a flexible boot and want a cheap way in. A C2 crampon on that boot would be liable to break.

The Grivel Monta Rosa, or similar 10 point crampon, would be perfect for their needs. I've used them on stiff soled B0 boots for years with no problems.


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