/ Whats the difference between a route and a boulder problem

This topic has been archived, and won't accept reply postings.
Chris63 on 27 Nov 2013
I have come across 5-6 metre routes 7-8 metre boulder problems. So when does a boulder problem become a route?
puppythedog on 27 Nov 2013
In reply to alpinechris:

when you take a beanie off and put a harness on?
The Pylon King on 27 Nov 2013
The Pylon King on 27 Nov 2013
The Pylon King on 27 Nov 2013
The Pylon King on 27 Nov 2013
The Pylon King on 27 Nov 2013
In reply to alpinechris:

That lot should keep you going. :)

If you manage to distill a definitive answer/formula from that lot then please let me know. :)
puppythedog on 27 Nov 2013
In reply to The Pylon King:

I've provided the answer.
The Pylon King on 27 Nov 2013
In reply to puppythedog:

That is true.
Chris63 on 27 Nov 2013
I think its an individual thing. Storm in a tea cup.

Live and let live eh.
Jon Stewart - on 27 Nov 2013
In reply to alpinechris:

Get a pad and try the route problem, falling off near the top. If you sprain your ankle, it's a boulder problem, if you break your ankle it's a micro-route, and if you break your leg/s/back/arms/pelvis etc it's a route.
Chris63 on 27 Nov 2013
In reply to Jon Stewart:

I only solo anyway so I try not to think rapid descents of any kind mats or otherwise
Chris63 on 27 Nov 2013
In reply to Jon Stewart:

And I suppose if there is no trace left of you at all its Deep water soloing! Oh no so what is that then???? with the tide in or with the tide out Ahhhhhhhhh.

Can't take it any more I'm simply off climbing end of...............
DerwentDiluted - on 28 Nov 2013
In reply to alpinechris:

Definition is in the eye of the beholder. The rock dosn't change.

Someone with pads, chalk bucket and toothbrush will see a boulder problem.
Someone else with a harness and rack and aversion to ground falls will see a route.
Someone else with confidence and a beer towel will see a nice little solo.
Someone else will see aggregates.
Jonny2vests - on 28 Nov 2013
In reply to DerwentDiluted:

I see a Peacock on a Space Hopper.
Sherlock - on 28 Nov 2013
In reply to alpinechris:

It's been said that bouldering is climbing with less chance of death but greater chance of injury.
The Pylon King on 28 Nov 2013
In reply to DerwentDiluted:

yes but what do you grade it in a guidebook?
Choss on 28 Nov 2013
In reply to The Pylon King:

> yes but what do you grade it in a guidebook?

If in doubt, give it a Lead Grade, people can Translate the tech Grade to V or font grading if they want to Approach it as a Highball boulder Problem?

A la the Prince at Avon gorge
The Ivanator - on 28 Nov 2013
In reply to Jonny2vests:

> I see a Peacock on a Space Hopper.

...and I thought mushroom season was over! ;-)
The Pylon King on 28 Nov 2013
In reply to Choss:

> If in doubt, give it a Lead Grade, people can Translate the tech Grade to V or font grading if they want to Approach it as a Highball boulder Problem?

> A la the Prince at Avon gorge

Yep, thats exactly what i have been doing. :)
armus on 28 Nov 2013
In reply to alpinechris:

> I have come across 5-6 metre routes 7-8 metre boulder problems. So when does a boulder problem become a route?

After 300'
dagibbs - on 28 Nov 2013
In reply to alpinechris:

When does, "it's just an approach" or "it's just a down-climb" or "it's just scrambling" become free-soloing?
jonnie3430 - on 28 Nov 2013
In reply to dagibbs:

When it's harder than Diff.

This topic has been archived, and won't accept reply postings.