/ NEW ARTICLE: Ten Tips For Bouldering Indoors

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UKC Articles - on 03 Jan 2014
A very 'outdoor' style indoor problem. Audrey Seguy at the Castle Climbing Centre, London, UK. Photo by Aneta Parchanska., 3 kb

In this article, Dave Flanagan gives 10 tips on how to improve at bouldering indoors and also how to use bouldering to improve your climbing outside... 



Read more at http://www.ukclimbing.com/articles/page.php?id=5981
Mick Ward - on 05 Jan 2014
In reply to UKC Articles:

I've just seen this - a really good article. As the worst boulderer ever, I need all the help I can get.

Thanks!

Mick
Simos on 05 Jan 2014
In reply to Mick Ward:

Yes great article although I'd like to contest the worst boulderer ever title! ;-)

I used to be absolutely hopeless, then took a 2-year break from climbing and since I started climbing again 6 months ago decided to focus on bouldering. Now I am a notch above the worst boulderer ever. I suspect after 43 years of climbing, you might be a couple of notches above that mark too lol
SteveSBlake - on 06 Jan 2014
In reply to Simos:

No, no, no.....I doubt if you two can even hold a candle up to my crap bouldering.

I am Spartacus!

Steve
1poundSOCKS - on 06 Jan 2014
In reply to UKC Articles: Good article, I tried the circuit idea yesterday on the blacks at the Depot in Pudsey, but ran out of steam (feeling it still!).

The only thing I would say, I'm not sure it is just technique that will determine how good you are, strength is essential too, especially finger strength. Take that away from any top boulderer and see where technique gets them. :)

Dave Flanagan - on 06 Jan 2014
In reply to 1poundSOCKS:

> The only thing I would say, I'm not sure it is just technique that will determine how good you are, strength is essential too, especially finger strength. Take that away from any top boulderer and see where technique gets them. :)

I agree strength is critical but I think there is too much focus on it. Certainly beginners should be aiming to learn how to climb rather than get strong.

Mick Ward - on 06 Jan 2014
In reply to Dave Flanagan:

> Certainly beginners should be aiming to learn how to climb rather than get strong.

Totally agree. So often, the other way around, simply results in people getting injured... while still having crap technique.

The increasing use of volumes indoors puts an even greater premium on good technique, spatial awareness and flexibility.

As a prominent boulder/route setter says, "It's all about the beautiful move..."

Mick

Mick Ward - on 06 Jan 2014
In reply to SteveSBlake:

> ...my crap bouldering.

> I am Spartacus!


Hmm... would this be Font 7c Spartacus? Ooops, forgot, in th'county, it's all VS, innit?

Mick

1poundSOCKS - on 06 Jan 2014
In reply to Dave Flanagan: Sorry, was it aimed at beginners. I agree, but personally I've been climbing for a few years, and a bit of strength training has had noticeable results recently.

Robert Durran - on 06 Jan 2014
In reply to Dave Flanagan:

> I agree strength is critical but I think there is too much focus on it. Certainly beginners should be aiming to learn how to climb rather than get strong.

But if you don't try problems which require you to pull as hard as possible(or better, harder than possible) you can get away with poor technique by just pullling hard. I reckon the best way to improve technique is to work on problems which initially seem too powerful and then play around with the footwork and body tension and position. That way, you learn technique and get stronger at the same time.
1poundSOCKS - on 06 Jan 2014
In reply to Robert Durran: I guess everyone's different, I find I can work on technique more effectively on easier stuff. Obviously I try to apply that to harder stuff, but I don't learn it as effectively whilst on the harder stuff.

Dave Flanagan - on 06 Jan 2014
In reply to Robert Durran:

What I really mean is that beginners should 'just' climb, no fingerboards or campusing etc.
duncan - on 07 Jan 2014
In reply to Dave Flanagan:

Dave's book 'Bouldering Essentials' reviewed here: http://ukbouldering.com/board/index.php?topic=23165.0

I thought it was very good. Almost anyone could learn something from it.
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Mick Ward - on 07 Jan 2014
In reply to Robert Durran:

> I reckon the best way to improve technique is to work on problems which initially seem too powerful and then play around with the footwork and body tension and position. That way, you learn technique and get stronger at the same time.

Completely agree. I'm lucky enough to be able to use a training facility set by Andy Long, a massively talented/in-demand route/problem setter. My initial response was always limestone inspired thuggery (OK, I admit it!) But Longy will rarely let you get away with this. Things are set so cunningly (lots of volumes/three dimensional stuff) that you have to get body position and 'technical foot faggotry' right - just to get into position. And then you often have to pull like f*ck!

It was an eye-opener for me. Once when I was whinging (as you do), one of Longy's mates casually remarked, "Well Malcolm (Smith) had to learn all this three-dimensional stuff too.." Gulp! OK, back to my Diff, with renewed spirit.

Mick

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