/ Clanking Fekking Hexes!

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crayefish - on 13 Jan 2014
Has anyone ever come up with a method for keeping those bloody hexes quiet? I don't mind on the crag but when up a mountain in peace and quiet it's bloody annoying.

And I am sure someone will say 'buy cams' but a) They don't work well in winter, b) They're heavier and c) (most importantly) I am tight and don't want to spend the money! :)
krikoman - on 13 Jan 2014
In reply to crayefish:

Poke some foam in the hole
splat2million on 13 Jan 2014
In reply to crayefish:

Ear plugs?
Otis - on 13 Jan 2014
In reply to crayefish:

Being the proud owner of a set of dmm torque nuts I know your anguish! With mine it's the big blue beast that makes the most noise-separating it from its buddies onto a different harness gear loop quietens things down remarkably. Worth playing around with!
CMcBain - on 13 Jan 2014
In reply to crayefish:

I'm not sure how well i'll explain this but here's a shot - Pull enough of the cord/sling where it sits against the metal of the hex to fit a krab. Then when racking clip both ends of the hex through the krab. This prevents them from swinging around and clanking off each other, helps if you have one per krab aswell.

I actually quite like the sound of hexes in winter so dont bother doing this! I'd imagine it's a bit of an inconvenience to place them if you use the above method though!
Bob on 13 Jan 2014
In reply to crayefish:

Put them on shorter loops, about the same length as the wire loops on Rocks or Wallnuts.
McKEuan - on 13 Jan 2014
In reply to crayefish:

I love the noise of hexes clanking. Maybe spread them around your harness on different biners?
Mountain Llama - on 13 Jan 2014
In reply to crayefish:
pull the sling through the hex to about half way, this reduces the amount they swing about and quietens things down a bit.

You do have to pull the sling out again while placing though

Davey
Post edited at 21:51
crayefish - on 13 Jan 2014
In reply to krikoman:
Great idea with the foam! I'll hunt around for some.

I have torque nuts too... great things but yeah the blue one is pretty noisy. Unfortunately I am totally gear-organisation anal (shame I am not like that in life!) so want all my hexes on the same loop :)

Shortening the sling is a good idea too. I am not sure about clipping the other end though, as with doubled slings on the torque nuts it would be confusing (well... you know) to unclip the right two with one hand.
Post edited at 21:58
crayefish - on 13 Jan 2014
In reply to McKEuan:

Oh and being torque nuts I also have them on individual krabs to save on qds (colour coded of course!).
Timmd on 13 Jan 2014
In reply to crayefish:

You couldn't learn to tune out the noise?

I have tinnitus, so nothing bothers me much, people or clanging hexes, I can not hear both if needs be.

Aha, you need to get tinnitus. (:-))
Post edited at 22:35
nufkin - on 13 Jan 2014
In reply to crayefish:

DMM make rubber slip covers for their military torque nuts. Only in black, though, so you have to practice guessing the size just by how big it is
wilkie14c - on 13 Jan 2014
In reply to nufkin:
> (In reply to crayefish)
> so you have to practice guessing the size just by how big it is

Thats a pretty big ask in todays climbing world ;-)
LastBoyScout on 13 Jan 2014
In reply to crayefish:

Put each one in a colour coded sock, like golf clubs.
althesin on 13 Jan 2014
In reply to crayefish:

I've learned to accept my inner bumbly and like the sound now, but socks/ prussics/ fags would do the job.
crayefish - on 13 Jan 2014
In reply to nufkin:

> DMM make rubber slip covers for their military torque nuts. Only in black, though, so you have to practice guessing the size just by how big it is

Lol I'll bring a ruler!
adam11 - on 13 Jan 2014
Excellent advice from CMcBain. Clipping them through the top loop of the sling works a treat - especially on long walk downs when you're still tooled up.

Northern Climber on 14 Jan 2014
In reply to crayefish:

just put each hex on a different length cord. that way they all hang at different heights and don't bash against each other. simple.
crayefish - on 14 Jan 2014
In reply to Northern Climber:

Not really worth re-slinging them (especially with the nice doubles fitted) just for that.

I'll take the suggestions here to stick a bit of foam in and clip them up during the approach etc. Just pulling the hexes up the sling doesn't work on those slick 8mm dyneema jobs as it just slides down unfortunately.
jonnie3430 - on 14 Jan 2014
In reply to crayefish:

> Not really worth re-slinging them (especially with the nice doubles fitted) just for that.

> I'll take the suggestions here to stick a bit of foam in and clip them up during the approach etc. Just pulling the hexes up the sling doesn't work on those slick 8mm dyneema jobs as it just slides down unfortunately.

If you take a man pill and ignore them it works just as well...
crayefish - on 14 Jan 2014
In reply to jonnie3430:

We don't all excited by the sound of cowbells...
petenebo - on 14 Jan 2014
In reply to crayefish:

Given your anal propensity, sounds as if foam in the hole is the way to go
BnB - on 14 Jan 2014
In reply to crayefish:

Tie an overhand under the hex after pulling it up the dyneema. Each at a different height. Sorted.
crayefish - on 14 Jan 2014
In reply to petenebo:
Always good to get advice from someone with experience ;)

Kid's hour over? Great :)

Thanks for advice guys!

BnB... yeah, as with clipping the other end, good for the approach, though a little annoying to undo on route. I prefer multi day routes so was kinda looking for something that wouldn't affect easy of placement.
Post edited at 08:30
GridNorth - on 14 Jan 2014
In reply to crayefish:

I have Torque nuts and it's possible to insert one inside another. The bit of sling that is carried in with it during the process also helps.
Tim Chappell - on 14 Jan 2014
In reply to crayefish:
Bubble-wrap them until you place them. Make sure your second carries some bubble-wrap too, so they can be properly re-silenced on removal.

Alternatively, do what Joe Brown and Don Whillans did: use wooden hexes.

Or stop carrying hexes altogether, and instead carry the modern Scottish winter climber's cutting edge protection-- the world-famous Tunnock's Caramel Wafer.
Post edited at 10:01
Mark Collins - on 14 Jan 2014
In reply to crayefish:

I mind them at the crag aswell. Maybe if they were tuned to a note, so could play a tune while walking around. I retired mine to the cupboard years ago for this reason. Hopefully, other people will read this thread and think about what noise pollution they're unnecessarily broadcasting to all in the vicinity.
andrewmcleod - on 14 Jan 2014
In reply to crayefish:

Mine were much quieter when segregated from their kin and scattered around different gear loops...
crayefish - on 14 Jan 2014
In reply to andrewmcleod:

> Mine were much quieter when segregated from their kin and scattered around different gear loops...

Difficult when you have gear-organisation-OCD :)

BnB - on 14 Jan 2014
In reply to crayefish:

Brrrrr..... Don't even go there
mrdigitaljedi - on 14 Jan 2014
In reply to crayefish:

I keep just my biggest hex now for belays the rest stay at home out of my and others hearing, bloody noisy things....

Chris
In reply to crayefish:

I love the sound of clanking cams. I always try and separate them a little to keep them as quiet as possible, but I think the sound is part of the climbing experience ! Gets you zoned more :)
panz - on 14 Jan 2014
In reply to McKEuan:

There is a citation from a climbers horror
-A bunch of climbers flew down beside us gaily clanking with hexes-
Hannes on 15 Jan 2014
In reply to crayefish:

Best way I found to keep the bastards quiet is to keep them in their plastic tub under the bed
crayefish - on 15 Jan 2014
In reply to beththeclimber:

I agree on the crags... it's a lovely Alpine sound (those cows with the bells on) I think!

But when you're plodding in the snow for a few days enjoying the solitude in the mountains, it can get a little annoying.
planetmarshall on 15 Jan 2014
In reply to Tim Chappell:

> Or stop carrying hexes altogether, and instead carry the modern Scottish winter climber's cutting edge protection-- the world-famous Tunnock's Caramel Wafer.

Useful, as a frozen wafer can also be buried and used as an abseil anchor.
Big Lee - on 15 Jan 2014
In reply to crayefish:

I wouldn't want to shorten the dyneema/cord as this would limit the hex usefulness when placing. I'd need to carry more gear to extend them properly. I think they are always going to clank together.

Maybe you could fill the hollow interior to dampen the noise? I use this stuff in my profession to fill cavities:

http://www.ottobock.se/cps/rde/xbcr/ob_se_sv/materials_4_pedilen_foams.pdf

It's a liquid that when mixed with the catalyst quickly expands into a lightweight foam to fill a given space. I'm sure there are similar commercial products available from DIY shops. Note that we usually use this product in a room with extraction!
Mr Lopez - on 15 Jan 2014
In reply to crayefish:
> (In reply to beththeclimber)
>
> But when you're plodding in the snow for a few days enjoying the solitude in the mountains, it can get a little annoying.

But how else will you get everyone in the pub to turn around and notice you entering harnessed on and fully racked up if not for the clanking sound?

crayefish - on 15 Jan 2014
In reply to Mr Lopez:

> But how else will you get everyone in the pub to turn around and notice you entering harnessed on and fully racked up if not for the clanking sound?

Because I'll enter upside down on one of the ceiling beams dressed head to toe in pink spandex!
Mr Lopez - on 15 Jan 2014
In reply to crayefish:
> (In reply to Mr Lopez)
>
> [...]
>
> Because I'll enter upside down on one of the ceiling beams dressed head to toe in pink spandex!

You'll need cams for that. I recommend a set 1-5 Camalots and double up on 2-3 with Totem cams for the mantle into the small girders.

crayefish - on 15 Jan 2014
In reply to Mr Lopez:

Are we talking an 1800's pub or a more modern one? Oak or beech beams?
Mr Lopez - on 15 Jan 2014
In reply to crayefish:

> (In reply to Mr Lopez)
>
> Are we talking an 1800's pub or a more modern one? Oak or beech beams?

Oh dear... Don't they teach anything at the "intro to climbing" courses in your local wall? For an 1800 pub you need to wear Austrian Tracht with feathered cap. Pink spandex is only ethically acceptable in neon lighted cocktail bars with 'sex on the beach' and 'pina coladas' on the menu.

Wearing pink spandex in an 1800's classic is like putting a bolt in three pebble slab (E0), only worse.
Post edited at 12:43
crayefish - on 15 Jan 2014
In reply to Mr Lopez:

You'll never get noticed on the ceiling if you're wearing a feathered cap... they'll just think you are a Robin Hood ornament! Perhaps if it's zazzed up with some leopard print but you're moving into pimp-climbing territory there.
Mr Lopez - on 15 Jan 2014
In reply to crayefish:
> (In reply to Mr Lopez)
>
> You'll never get noticed on the ceiling if you're wearing a feathered cap...

That's why yodeling after every move is an integral part in the ethics of pub puntering.

> Perhaps if it's zazzed up with some leopard print but you're moving into pimp-climbing territory there.

Now you are being silly. Wearing leopard print and/or white socks is a sure way for everyone to know that your top redpoint was dogging an f4+ back when Dallas was a tv hit. Definitely not the right move to get laid by the fat barmaid.
crayefish - on 15 Jan 2014
In reply to Mr Lopez:

> That's why yodeling after every move is an integral part in the ethics of pub puntering.

Difficult when you are trying to hold the rim of your pint glass between your teeth...

> Now you are being silly. Wearing leopard print and/or white socks is a sure way for everyone to know that your top redpoint was dogging an f4+ back when Dallas was a tv hit. Definitely not the right move to get laid by the fat barmaid.

Oh I normally just buy them a pasty... works a charm.
jkarran - on 15 Jan 2014
In reply to crayefish:

Pack the hole with springy packing foam from computer boxes. They'll still click but you'll kill the ringing sound.

I'd just put up with it, you tune it out eventually.

jk
Mr Lopez - on 15 Jan 2014
In reply to crayefish:
> (In reply to Mr Lopez)
>
> [...]
>
> Difficult when you are trying to hold the rim of your pint glass between your teeth...

Youth of today, all power no technique... http://www.mountainproject.com/images/5/76/107760576_large_de15de.jpg



deanstonmassif on 15 Jan 2014
In reply to Big Lee:

> Maybe you could fill the hollow interior to dampen the noise? I use this stuff in my profession to fill cavities. It's a liquid that when mixed with the catalyst quickly expands into a lightweight foam to fill a given space. I'm sure there are similar commercial products available from DIY shops.

Probably best not go dipping the dyneema slings of hexes into a complex chemical such as this, unless one of the gear manufacturers have tested same first. The stuff you get from B&Q has warnings all over it, suggesting it might conceivably be aggressive to sling materials; I wouldn't take the risk.

I disperse my hexes about my gear loops when walking off, to reduce noise, balance out their weight and to try and reduce their patella whacking tendencies.....



crayefish - on 15 Jan 2014
In reply to Mr Lopez:

What are the chances of that photo existing? lol
nufkin - on 15 Jan 2014
In reply to Tim Chappell:

> instead carry the modern Scottish winter climber's cutting edge protection-- the world-famous Tunnock's Caramel Wafer.

Not to knock the Tunnock's, but can you imagine corries full of all the crinkling and rustling? Best to go with bananas. It's hard to get much noise out of a banana
PPP - on 15 Jan 2014
In reply to crayefish:

What about feeding an accessory cord through all your hexes and then attaching it to your harness? You can even use a knot which is easy to untie, for example a slippery hitch.

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