/ The Humble Climbing Blogs....

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JossGuyer - on 15 Jan 2014
This is a message to all you climbers who blog and share your stories on the net, but just want to get a little more recognised..who wouldn't? so without further ado here is mine and my climbing partners blog...about two university lads trying to make the most of the climbing world..http://thenoseinone.blogspot.co.uk/
Martin Bennett - on 15 Jan 2014
In reply to JossGuyer:
" . . . just want to get a little more recognised..who wouldn't?"

Me, and all the people I know.

"Humble climbing blogs" - an oxymoron surely?

Genuine question: why do you want to be recognised? What do you want to be recognised as?

Post edited at 20:02
highclimber - on 15 Jan 2014
In reply to Martin Bennett:

I'm not a fan of most personal blogs. They are mostly self-serving, egotistical drivel, usually poorly written in questionable English.
JimboWizbo - on 15 Jan 2014
In reply to JossGuyer:

I keep a blog, mainly because I enjoy recounting our days out, it also forces me to use my camera more to document days and gets me using Lightroom. I agree though it's nice to check your stats and see you've got a few more views or subscribers!
JossGuyer - on 15 Jan 2014
In reply to Martin Bennett:

Myself, you can tell your own story without it becoming a image you don't fit, just telling stories to others
MischaHY - on 15 Jan 2014
In reply to JossGuyer:

No need to judge him for promoting his blog, most folk will enjoy a quick glance if it is well written/presented and regularly updated.

With those points in mind, I had a quick glance at it - my quick impression on the writing, having read a few posts is fairly positive - relatively engaging and not too much repetition etc. More cohesive writing will come with time.
My main piece of advice would be to edit the design, the font is way too small and makes it difficult to read. Choose a nice, bold font that grabs the attention for titles, and then a more understated but easily legible one for the main body of text. But good effort so far, keep at it! Persistence is the key to success.

My one other piece of advice is in regards to the goals expressed in the most recent post - going from the (albeit very brief) description of your current climbing level, 7b+ is probably a bit out of reach for a six month timeframe if you are currently climbing 6b, mainly because of the fierce increase in both technical ability and physical fitness required. My advice would be to aim for 7a, which will be hard enough in of itself.

Keep at it!
Rachel Slater - on 16 Jan 2014
In reply to JossGuyer:

I don't think aiming to improve from 6b to 7b+ in 6 months is too ambitious if you work hard. I managed to improve almost a number grade in less than three months and I didn't even have any goals... (I was climbing full time however).
JossGuyer - on 16 Jan 2014
In reply to MischaHY:

Thank you very much! thanks for taking the time to read it! We are, ourselves a bit wary that 7b+ is a little over zealous but I think if we aim high and fall only slightly lower the results will show! Have you got any other first impressions that really stuck out about the blog? thanks again!

Joss
nw - on 16 Jan 2014
In reply to JossGuyer:

OMG!Exclamation marks!!!!
JossGuyer - on 16 Jan 2014
In reply
!must make statement!!!!!!!!!! :)
nw - on 16 Jan 2014
In reply to JossGuyer:

> In reply

> !must make statement!!!!!!!!!! :)

Yes, that pretty much sums up your blog.
tiffanykate12 on 16 Jan 2014
In reply to JossGuyer:

Good job :) I've been writing a blog for a few years and what started as something just for me has grown more than I'd realised and opened up writing opportunities with other websites. No harm in some self-publicity!!
Kieran_John - on 16 Jan 2014
In reply to JossGuyer:

I actually quite like skimming climbing blogs, be they of pro climbers or punters.

Had a quick read of yours, liked it. Needs more pretty pictures.
ads.ukclimbing.com
LeeWood - on 17 Jan 2014
In reply to JossGuyer:
I've taken a look at your blog - good start. I would repeat other's advice to make the font larger and use sans serif (which you do in some posts). I find climbing blogs interesting when they give away useful information such as - recommendations for routes, crags, and areas. After tthat I think that training info could be useful if you give genuine feedback on setbacks (which you may feel would be uncool) - a degree of self-depracation.

Oh - and *always* use photos to resumé your topic
Post edited at 09:13

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