/ Latest motoring scam by UK Govt

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woolsack - on 17 Jan 2014
Any idea how much this little earner will be worth to the treasury?

http://www.motoring.co.uk/car-news/private-cars-cannot-be-sold-with-road-tax-from-october-2014_60347...

wintertree - on 17 Jan 2014
In reply to woolsack:

> Any idea how much this little earner will be worth to the treasury?

I doubt it will earn much as the vendor will be refunded unused tax.

There may be an increased cost to the consumer with the tax being raised to support higher administrative costs associated with the increased churning this change will generate, but the switch to an electronic database system will surely introduce significant operational savings... Erm...
andrewmcleod - on 17 Jan 2014
In reply to woolsack:

You already can't drive away legally without buying insurance for the new vehicle. Presumably you will then immediately be able to buy tax online, so it adds an extra step but doesn't stop you doing anything you could do before I think?
woolsack - on 17 Jan 2014
In reply to wintertree:

> I doubt it will earn much as the vendor will be refunded unused tax.

Refunds are only on unused months though

wintertree - on 17 Jan 2014
In reply to woolsack:

> Refunds are only on unused months though

It's really not a major cost or earner though, is it? If you have a middle of the range CO2 emission vehicle you're paying 200 per year in tax. On average a car will be sold with 0.5 months of unrefundable road tax, which is 8.33. Compare that to the cost of driving the car home from the sale.... For the treasury or DVLA (or whoever keeps it) it will multiply up by the number of re-sales per year but will still only represent a fraction of a fraction of their tax take.

You'd hope they would move to an enlightened system that refunds by the day, however.

deepsoup - on 17 Jan 2014
In reply to woolsack:
> Refunds are only on unused months though

And new tax is backdated to the start of the current month, so the seller pays up to the end of the month they sell the car in, while the buyer starts paying from the beginning of the same month.
Kieran_John - on 17 Jan 2014
In reply to woolsack:

About bloody time they did this. I was thinking how pointless tax discs were when I had to pay for mine last month.
Scarab9 - on 17 Jan 2014
In reply to deepsoup:

> And new tax is backdated to the start of the current month, so the seller pays up to the end of the month they sell the car in, while the buyer starts paying from the beginning of the same month.

yeah that's what I immediately thought when reading it.

I guess the question is if the new system will make things much easier. It SHOULD, but I'll believe it when I see it as the DVLA is often a shambles(I recently got some mail from a house I moved out of a year ago, and have 5 separate debt collection agencies chasing me for unpaid vehicle tax on 3 separate motorbikes, two of which I've got the slip to show they've processed the sale to other people, and the other was scrapped by an impound (or whatever you call em) after being recovered from being stolen).

IF it's easier then the realistically small cost to the buyer and seller isn't a big deal. If it's still a pain in the arse then I'd be more inclined to be annoyed by them effectively scamming a month of tax money (part from buyer part from seller) each time a vehicle is sold.
Cambridge-Climber - on 18 Jan 2014
In reply to woolsack: Now, however, enforcement comes via a computerised database that automatically spits out fines to non-compliers.

The same database that leads to the driver being stopped by police, when the vehicle is insured, but that the insurance company have failed to update their records, they did however take their administration fee.

More lazy policing, after all wasn't Sutcliffe caught for false number plates? But only by a copper, an ANPR camera wouldn't have picked them up!

Then there will be the inevitable "admin" charge deducted from the refund.

Thieves, that's all this and the last Govt. are!


Cambridge-Climber - on 18 Jan 2014
In reply to Scarab9:

> IF it's easier then the realistically small cost to the buyer and seller isn't a big deal. If it's still a pain in the arse then I'd be more inclined to be annoyed by them effectively scamming a month of tax money (part from buyer part from seller) each time a vehicle is sold.

Surely the new anniversary will be the same as insurance, it runs for 12 months from the date of purchase, after all there is no longer any need for pre-printed circular receipts.

And in the real world....
argyle_dude - on 18 Jan 2014
In reply to Cambridge-Climber:

> Now, however, enforcement comes via a computerised database that automatically spits out fines to non-compliers.

> The same database that leads to the driver being stopped by police, when the vehicle is insured, but that the insurance company have failed to update their records, they did however take their administration fee.

> More lazy policing, after all wasn't Sutcliffe caught for false number plates? But only by a copper, an ANPR camera wouldn't have picked them up!

Firstly, it's not lazy policing, the DVLA are responsible for fining/recovering vehicles with no tax. The police can issue tickets for failing to display a tax disc but normally when a car has no tax it usually indicates other more serious offences like no MOT or insurance.

Secondly, there is nothing lazy about ANPR cameras. Officers can and do stop vehicles without the aid of ANPR cameras. It is simply another tool in the arsenal and surely the more tools the better. Take your example, if they were driving within the confines of the law and highway code and not behaving oddly an officer is unlikely to dig any deeper. If it flashed up on the in car ANPR camera as a green ford focus but is actually a red VW golf, they may stop an offender that otherwise would have gone undetected.

Kipper - on 18 Jan 2014
In reply to Cambridge-Climber:

> The same database ...

Or a different one, in this case.

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