/ Training and weight loss

This topic has been archived, and won't accept reply postings.
chubbs2 - on 27 Jan 2014
I've recently started training for my first marathon (have previously done a few halfs) and have upped my weekly distance from about 10 miles (which I've always done for general fitness) to about 25 miles.

Thing is I'm slightly mystified that I don't seem to be losing any weight, but staying constant. I genuinely don't think I've increased my calorie intake (even with more mileage) and if anything maybe a bit less, as I've cut down the booze a bit. The weight loss thing is not that important to me really, I just thought it might be a useful side effect that might help my climbing to be honest.

I'm approaching 50 so I wondered if it might be metabolic? Anyone got any views, apart from I'm kidding myself about the calories.

Thanks.
mh554 on 27 Jan 2014
In reply to chubbs2:

Im no expert, but I would imagine your weight to perhaps increase as the fat turns to muscle. Do you look trimmer?
IainRUK - on 27 Jan 2014
In reply to chubbs2:

obvious reasons are over-compensation, fluid retention from damage or fat> muscle.

I'd just ignore short term weight changes though. My weight fluctuates massively through the day.

But 25 miles per week is around 2500 cals.. maybe 2500-3000 so you should slowly drop if you do keep calories the same.
dale1968 - on 27 Jan 2014
In reply to chubbs2:

One side effect of training is people tend to be less active generally, as for your bmr it does decrease with age, as does your muscularity, decreasing your calorific needs.
Cutting back your calorie intake further may not help, but eating the same total amount in smaller helpings during the day will boost your metabolic rate, also pushing weights will increase your bmr, as you increase your lean body mass
Drinking alcohol also depresses your testosterone levels, making all the above more difficult
It all depends how focused/bothered you are, your body will respond given the correct diet/training
chubbs2 - on 27 Jan 2014
In reply to chubbs2:

Thanks for the replies folks. I'd not thought of some of that, not least that 25 miles is only 2500 calories. I've also been doing a bit more climbing training and my upper body seems slightly trimmer, so that muscle to fat thing may explain some of it. Guess I was just hoping for the miracle disappearance of my love handles.
John Gillott - on 27 Jan 2014
In reply to chubbs2:

I wouldn't rule out the possibility that you are eating more.... When I run more I eat more to compensate so don't lose weight. It might not be obvious you are doing it. A few more snacks? Slightly larger portions? Easy to not notice.

This month, unusually, I've been combining training with deliberate weight loss. The weight has come off and the simple reason is that I've eaten less. I make sure I eat after training, but I've kept the portions down and cut out the snacks. I've also got used to feeling a bit hungry. I'm afraid it really is that simple.
IainRUK - on 27 Jan 2014
In reply to John Gillott:

> I've also got used to feeling a bit hungry. I'm afraid it really is that simple.

That's what I find.. when I go to sleep hungry a lot I drop weight quickly..
chubbs2 - on 27 Jan 2014
In reply to IainRUK:

Fair points, I'm certainly not going to bed feeling hungry. Maybe it really is just as simple as too many calories, but I really do feel I'm not eating more and if anything less, as I seem to get full more quickly recently.
SteveRi - on 27 Jan 2014
In reply to chubbs2:
I think when you're training odd things do happen to your weight. I raced hard on Sat and did a decent effort Sun ...and woke up heavier than ever. A good voiding and a gentle run at lunch and I was 3lb lighter. See what the longer term trends are. About 100 kcals per mile and 3500 kcals per pound aren't bad rules of thumb so you can see you need to attack the problem from both ends.
Post edited at 16:07
JohnnyW - on 27 Jan 2014
In reply to chubbs2:

I usually work off my winter plumage when I do some good winter days/routes, and when I start to train for cycling sportives.

My issue is that I get all shaky if I don't have enough calories before/during training, so never manage to really get the weight off, as I need to eat! I too am 50 this year.

I did JOG to LE last year in 9 days, and didn't lose that much even then, doing over 100m a day.......

I'm crap at dieting, but wouldn't mind cutting down a bit, as long as I could then face the mileage without feeling weak.
IainRUK - on 27 Jan 2014
In reply to SteveRi:

I always put on weight after an ultra.. it takes 3-5 days or so to be lighter. I just put that down to water retention from swollen legs/muscle damage.
SteveRi - on 27 Jan 2014
In reply to IainRUK:
I think you're right, I've had similar with big bike rides.
luke obrien - on 27 Jan 2014
In reply to chubbs2:

That's never going to happen with all the flap jack you get through
goatee - on 27 Jan 2014
In reply to chubbs2:

I have a similar problem. I'm a similar age and I have always had to watch my weight. I have found that it has become increasingly more difficult to shed the pounds and recently I found (not to my surprise) that I was heavier than at any time in the last eight years so I took the bull by the horns and gave up alcohol and all sweet snacks (biscuits etc). I haven't dieted at all, just cut out the rubbish. A half stone has gone in the past four weeks. I am well pleased and aim to continue for a considerable time to come. I used to try and train the weight off but the fact is I don't think it is possible. Cut out the bad stuff, see what happens.
John Gillott - on 27 Jan 2014
In reply to goatee:

You have dieted, and done it well - cutting out sweet snacks and alcohol is dieting!

I was in the same position as you and have also shed half a stone since New Year. I'm just about at my normal weight now. Normal that is for the past few years. Twenty years ago I was half a stone lighter again. I'm anticipating it's going to be harder to lose the half stone needed to get back to that weight.
goatee - on 28 Jan 2014
In reply to John Gillott:

Good for you. I still have a fair bit to go.
chubbs2 - on 28 Jan 2014
In reply to luke obrien:

Oh trust you to wade in with reality, when all these other nice people are trying to be supportive helpful and sympathetic. It's alright for you young people - shouldn't you be off playing with your X station play box thing anyway. Clear off to Rocktalk....clearly there's a better class of poster on the running forum. I remember when it was all fields you know.
chubbs2 - on 28 Jan 2014
In reply to goatee:

Cutting out alcohol AND sweet snacks - fair play to you pal good effort. Trouble is they are abut the only thing that keeps me going!!
mbh - on 28 Jan 2014
In reply to chubbs2:
I am about the same age. Almost two years ago, after a two yearish lull in activity, I had got to 9 kg overweight, according to all the charts.

Now I am about 5-6 kg beneath the normal/overweight boundary, and have a BMI of 23 ish.

I didn't really change my diet (which wasn't bad, but does include red wine. I know I should cut that out, but I can't quite go there!), I just started exercising, a lot, and took a career step backwards (for less stress).

I run about 50 miles a week and used to swim on top of that a couple of times. However, I lost most weight in the first six months and have been fairly stable ever since, despite an extra 5000 or so calories going out each week in exercise. I must be eating more, I guess, but I don't notice it.
Post edited at 07:57
ads.ukclimbing.com
Giles Davis - on 09 Feb 2014
In reply to goatee:

This has worked for me as well. I'm 49 this June and have cut out alcohol and chocolate, biscuits, cakes etc. and the weight has fallen off me (running about 25km per week and doing one 30km bike ride per week, a 10km hike + plus indoor climbing . . . . . . and outdoor if the weather ever lets up).

I made an effort to eat a lighter, more balanced diet and I feel so much better for it.

This topic has been archived, and won't accept reply postings.