/ How to fit in training around climbing

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Willi Crater - on 10 Feb 2014
What do people think the best way is to fit in training (climbing specific I mean) around climbing such that the actual climbing isn't impacted on. For example, I get outside 2 to 3 times a week at the moment, during which I'm mostly trying to red-point stuff (sport). This makes it tricky to fit much training in whilst getting enough rest such that I can make the best of actual climbing days (which is what it's all about after all). However, because I'm mostly red-pointing a small number of projects I think I need the training in order to maintain general climbing strength. So find myself in a bit of a catch-22 situation.

Anyone else got similar issues?
Si dH - on 10 Feb 2014
In reply to AndrewW:

My approach would be to gradually up the volume until you can climb every day, then only rest the day or two before a big goal redpoint attempt, rather than before every outdoor session. If you want to train and build strength then I think you'll have to accept not being 100% fresh for every day out, but it shouldn't be long before you see a net benefit if you're training well.
Have to confess that ive never been in your particular situation but i have been training 5-6 times per week this year and still getting out when the weather let's me.
Willi Crater - on 10 Feb 2014
In reply to Si dH:

Sounds like a plan. I'll give it a go and how I get on.

Cheers.
llanberis36 - on 10 Feb 2014
In reply to AndrewW:

If it helps the biggest obstacle is being strict with what is training and what is climbing, and really sticking to it, even missing good climbing days to keep on track with a training plan

Nick Russell on 10 Feb 2014
In reply to AndrewW:

It depends what your ultimate motivation is really. I can understand wanting to make the most of all (outdoor) climbing days, and fit training in around that. This is hard to do (but definitely possible!), and probably won't let you make the quickest gains.

If you want to improve as quickly as possible, you could benefit from periodisation. That is, draw a line between the periods of time when you are 'training' and those when you are 'performing'. Different training periods should focus on different areas (e.g. strength, endurance), while just maintaining a level on the others.

That's not to say no 'actual climbing days' during a training period; just adjust your expectations. Use that time to work moves on your project, or visit a new area and onsight a load of routes below your redpoint grade, or do some bouldering... Then, at the end of the training period, take a light week before starting a 'performance phase' where you go all out on your hard repdoints.

I'm just starting to attempt the periodisation approach, I'll see if it pays off when (if) the weather improves and I can get out again.
shark - on 10 Feb 2014
In reply to AndrewW:
Spot on. Its true that if you want to maximise your redpoint chances you need to be fully recovered and fresh but the rest required between sessions ends up compromising gains and so you end up weak although with some ticks (hopefully) in the bag.

To get round this I suggest youd make one of your outdoor days a bouldering or working a new route day. Also when you get back home from oredpointing days do a fingerboard, weights and core session in the evening. Obviously you need to be motivated to do this but should mean you get the best of both worlds.
Post edited at 09:29
Willi Crater - on 10 Feb 2014
In reply to shark:

This sounds a possible goer. Mind you, my fingers are generally pretty trashed after a day out, but I'll give it a go and see how I get on.
Willi Crater - on 10 Feb 2014
In reply to AndrewW:

Interesting that a few peeps have the point of view that might be better to give up some of the climbing days for training. Will definately consider this, although it's dashed hard to do this when the weather is great ;-)
shark - on 10 Feb 2014
In reply to AndrewW:

> Interesting that a few peeps have the point of view that might be better to give up some of the climbing days for training. Will definately consider this, although it's dashed hard to do this when the weather is great ;-)

Don't do that. An alternative is to train at the crag. Bouldering for strength, laps on routes for stamina etc
Nick Russell on 10 Feb 2014
In reply to AndrewW:

> Interesting that a few peeps have the point of view that might be better to give up some of the climbing days for training.

I'm not so much advocating giving up climbing days, so much as adjusting what you do on them. You can't keep throwing yourself at hard redpoints and expect to make rapid improvements. Sure, you will eventually climb your project, but that's largely down to very specific details: executing the moves on that route more efficiently, gaining strength for the few moves on the crux sequence, etc.
French Erick - on 10 Feb 2014
In reply to Nick Russell:

Climbers are reknown for wanting to perform at all times: no drills, just fun. All well and good but not if you want to significantly better your performance. I am now trying to get to grips with attempting periodisation: but I have limited amount of time AND my peak performance time may come up when there's not much going weatherwise...3 years in the thinking and I'm still to commit. I am still to make any significant gains too.
And I thought I climbed for fun ;)
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Willi Crater - on 10 Feb 2014
In reply to AndrewW:

Lot's of interesting stuff to think about. Thanks to all who responded.

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