/ yorkshire 3 peaks challenge

This topic has been archived, and won't accept reply postings.
RockAngel on 10 Feb 2014
I want to do this challenge but Ive just seen that its 25 miles. I think I could probably walk some of it and run some of it (like the downhill bits!) and a crazy partner for it who put the idea in my head! It wont be until the summer so I have about 6 months to keep training for it. Really, is this possible? 25 miles sounds like a hell of a long way for a walk/run for a complete novice to running (got plenty of years hill walking). How long is the time limit for the challenge?
(I did 2km non stop today for the first time ever at the gym but am going out on Wednesday morning for a practise in the real world).
teddy_simmon - on 10 Feb 2014
In reply to RockAngel:

Don't worry too much its quite achievable at a walking pace!

Its 26 Miles and the time limit for the challenge is twelve hours which is reality is just over 2 mile an hour. I managed it and would not say I am super fit and certainly cannot run 2km!!

Matt
Mr Fuller on 10 Feb 2014
In reply to RockAngel:

It's totally possible to do as you plan. I have walked it once (in about ten hours) and run/walked it once in 5 hours 10 min. You don't have to run all of it to gain massive time gaps over walking- run all the downhills and the road section and you'll fly along. No one normal runs the uphills! Get some running training in and you'll be fine.
Mark Collins - on 10 Feb 2014
In reply to RockAngel:

I did it a couple of years back with a mate, and didn't need to run to complete the challenge. A good job, as I'm totally rubbish at running. Something I found worked for me, was to hardly stop. You can easily eat and drink while you walk, if you choose the right place to do it. Keep going or take a very short rest when you see everyone kicking back on the summits. The weather was good and clear when we did it just after the clocks went forward. However, there was a total bog between Pen Y Ghent and the road. I was up to my thighs in it, and thought that was the end of our challenge. In the end it probably spurred us on to move faster. I don't do time challenges of any kind normally, but found it really good as a change. I was tired and cold by the end of it though, sat in the pub with my duvet on all evening.
Scarab9 - on 11 Feb 2014
In reply to RockAngel:

As above you can walk it in the time. You've also got 6 months, and without needing to get silly with the training you can become a much fitter runner by then (don't listen to the numerous folk these days who say you need to train 6 times a week for a marathon and all that!)

Some of the route is lovely, there's some fun downhills if ya like the buzz. The ups are long but mostly not too steep for long. Must say some of it is horrible running though, sharp numerous rocks....ouch. it was full winter when I did it though.

Go out for some long walks in the hills and just run when it feels right if you want some practice. When it comes to the uphill bits walking fitness is more important for speed than running fitness (unless your seriously good). Mostly just keep on the move constantly.

Also plan your kit. If you want to run any you wanna travel light but that could mean getting too cold if you get knackered.

thedatastream on 11 Feb 2014
In reply to Mark Collins:

> ...However, there was a total bog between Pen Y Ghent and the road. I was up to my thighs in it, and thought that was the end of our challenge...

New-ish path that doesn't take in the delights of the bog has been instated with decent covering and new gates. See route here

http://walkingcaveman.blogspot.co.uk/2012/11/yorkshire-three-peaks-new-alternative.html

Would echo all of the above advice
PaulHarris - on 11 Feb 2014
In reply to thedatastream:

Nice to hear a path has been created over the bog. Did it in the late 70's and that part was horrible. The rest of the walk was great. Me and a friend just turned up and did it no real training averagely fit person should be ok just walking it.
quirky - on 11 Feb 2014
In reply to RockAngel:

All fairly straight forward (especially now the bog is skirted), easily done in 12hrs with a modicum of fitness. Nice day out, plenty of easily runnable sections. Walk the ups, run the downs and flats and you will be round in no time.
;)
The New NickB - on 11 Feb 2014
In reply to thedatastream:

Ran the 3 peaks a few months ago with a couple of friends who are doing the race in April, we followed the old none race day route from Pen-y-gent, which probably added half an hour to the run, horrible terrain.

To the OP, a fairly fit walker would probably take 10 hours, you can knock a couple of hours off that by jogging the descents. We did in 5 and a half hours, but stopped for lunch, took photos on summits and generally wasted a lot of time. The guys that I ran with will be aiming for sub hour hours on race day.

I think IainR did the 3 Peaks Race in 3:17 a few years ago, a mate of mine from my club won it in 1969, he ran something like 2:44, on a very slightly different course.

It is a nice, but tiring day out, running or walking.
PPP - on 11 Feb 2014
In reply to RockAngel:

Seems more than doable. Also, you do not need much gear for it (no sleeping equipment, no spare clothing or loads of food). I would be worried more about the ascent rather than the distance - keep going is not as difficult as ascending/descending.
You can also investigate on Naismith's rule, which can by adjusted by Tranter's correction. It has little to do with the real time (if you are not marathon runner, the time will vary* - more about it in the end), but it is quite accurate estimate.

I have done 7 Munros a day (West Cairngorms) with 3192m ascent (followed by 3217m descent) and 42km (26 miles). The ascent is as twice as much as in Yorkshire 3. Oh, and it was 8th day of trekking, with full 40l bag with a tiny tent, sleeping bag, over 2 kilos of food and a little bit of extra stuff. I did not run, enjoyed greeting some people and reindeer ( https://www.dropbox.com/s/0wcl1tke3xc8e01/69900033.JPG ), etc. I have finished the day in 16h50min. Naismith's Rule suggested 13 hours 43 minutes.

* Why Tranter's correction or Naismith's rule do not work? I think there are too many factors, including weather, terrain, mood, food, etc. I have logged two days (one easy day between them) with similar numbers:
5 Munros: +1780m, -2030m, 25.28km, Naismith's: 8h1m (West to Glenshee Ski Centre)
10 Munros: +1833m, -2115m, 40.8km, Naismith's: 11h13m (East to Glenshee Ski Centre)

However, both times it took 12h40m to finish. All differences I can remember are:
- The former day included more steep sections.
- The latter day I did not sleep well (if I feel sleepy, I do things faster).
- At the latter day I met few groups of soldiers (they had a challenge), so at few sections I kept a pace together with them.
- I was enthusiastic to do 10 Munros a day and get to Loch Callater bothy before dark. It was my first bothy ever.
- At latter day I ran out of water at noon and had to hurry a little bit. I did not alter the planned route.
Mark Collins - on 11 Feb 2014
In reply to thedatastream:

> New-ish path that doesn't take in the delights of the bog has been instated with decent covering and new gates. See route here



Cheers for that, I may do it again sometime.
bentley's biceps - on 04 Mar 2014
In reply to Mark Collins:

I ran the Pen-y-Ghent section yesterday, that path is great.
Pete Pozman - on 04 Mar 2014
In reply to RockAngel:

It's about 24 miles and 5,400 feet of ascent. People who are unfit do this regularly in under 12 hours (this includes stopping for a bite every now and again)which is the "official" challenge time. If you apply Naismith's Rule to the net travelling time of about 11 hours, this is going quite well. The way you're talking I'd set your sights on walking it. I think you'll get sufficient buzz from doing it in under 12. Of course if the weather's bad be prepared to bale out. Oh, you need an early start as well, about 7.00 am to 7.30.
mc2006 - on 04 Mar 2014
In reply to RockAngel:

We are looking at doing the Y3P in May hopefully before all the crowds of summer!
Does anyone know how long it rougly takes to walk between Penyghent and whernside?
lummox - on 04 Mar 2014
In reply to mc2006:

depends on your speed ! Maybe 2.5 hours ?
bentley's biceps - on 04 Mar 2014
In reply to mc2006:

Yesterday I ran from Horton over Pen Y Ghent to Ribblehead viaduct: 2hrs 20mins. I'm no runner!
graeme jackson - on 04 Mar 2014
In reply to RockAngel:

I took parties of scouts on it a few times in the early 90's when i still lived in leeds. None of them had any problems and they were all less fit than your average climber. i'd say the only thing to avoid is stopping off at the Hill inn for a pint before heading up ingleborough
Lusk - on 04 Mar 2014
In reply to graeme jackson:

I call it Hotel California. :-)
graeme jackson - on 04 Mar 2014
In reply to Lusk:

Like :-)
butteredfrog - on 04 Mar 2014
In reply to Lusk:
It's a shadow of its former self. Gone are the days when the place was full of cavers, climbers and hells angels. Live music and late drinks in the barn and stagger to your tent on the car park. :(

ads.ukclimbing.com
waterbaby - on 05 Mar 2014
In reply to RockAngel:

I want to do this but fear my legs may not last through the ascents and descents. I think you just sparked my interest again!
I walk a lot but there are not that many big hills in Surrey and I rarely exceed 7 miles.

So I guess to get fit for it would require me to climb more hills and increase my distance when walking?
altirando - on 06 Mar 2014
In reply to RockAngel:

Can I suggest it is best not to think of the walk as a 'challenge'. I can remember setting off on a December day about ten and just enjoying the walk, going back into Horton just as it got dark without any running and indeed stopping off at the Hill Inn for refreshment.
lummox - on 06 Mar 2014
In reply to altirando:

6 hours of daylight without running and a stop for a pint ? That's impressively quick walking..
Pete Pozman - on 08 Mar 2014
In reply to waterbaby:

The Surrey Hills near Dorking give loads of opportunities for off roading and hill work. You'll be able to factor in a couple of thousand feet of ascent easily into a 7 mile run. Upping the distance is more important though. I've known superb runners grind to a halt on Whernside because they weren't used to the distance.

This topic has been archived, and won't accept reply postings.